Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 237849

Shown: posts 15 to 39 of 39. Go back in thread:

 

Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression McPac

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 1, 2003, at 9:31:27

In reply to Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression, posted by McPac on June 30, 2003, at 13:59:31

> Lar, MIGHT the easier solution be HEALING the leaky gut in the first place (and then being able to eat whatever WITHOUT the reaction)? Another site on-line (Dr. Stoll) harps on this constantly....he (and other followers) STRONGLY emphasizes SKILLED RELAXATION as one of THE main components of healing a leaky gut AND overall mental/physical health. Have you ever looked into Skilled Relaxation Lar? Many SWEAR by it. Another HUGE problem he talks about constantly is "bracing" (don't know if you're aware of this concept). Sooooooo many ideas/possible causes/possible solutions/theories, etc.....you'd have to live to be 1,000 yrs old to try them all out! Thoughts Lar? Thanks!!

Just for the record, this Dr. Stoll is not the Dr. Stoll of fish oil fame.

I've read through most of the entire site, and my gut reaction is "fringe", i.e. the fringe of reality. Some of the concepts are bizarre, like the idea that cerebro-spinal fluid is circulated via pulses of the skull bones. Gahh!

Now, the utility of meditation in controlling stress is without question, IMHO. Although I've not heard the term Skilled Relaxation before, I'm certainly familiar with the outcome. However, I don't see how it could possibly cure leaky gut syndrome.

Lar

 

vegetarianism/mental health problems?

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 1, 2003, at 10:22:43

In reply to Lar, Re: Celiac disease and depression, posted by McPac on June 30, 2003, at 1:27:17

This discussion is interesting to me for a few reasons.

First, when I was 21, I became a vegetarian. I remained so for 4 years. Two years into it, at age 23, I developed symptoms of OCD, for which I took Serzone. Two years after that, at 25, I was dx'd with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, treated, started eating meat again, and now at 27 no longer have the ocd symptoms and am not on meds.

Meanwhile, a friend is developing some symptoms of psychosis (http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/social/20030617/msgs/237122.html), and this is approximately 7 months after she switched to a vegan diet. I wonder if she could be affected by an allergy to something that she commonly eats, or may be gluten intolerant and is 'filling up' on glutens much of the time?

Maybe I could use suggest that she consider getting tested for these things? Even without the link, she has a very sensitive body and suffers from digestive problems.

 

Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems? bookgurl99

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 1, 2003, at 11:22:38

In reply to vegetarianism/mental health problems?, posted by bookgurl99 on July 1, 2003, at 10:22:43

> This discussion is interesting to me for a few reasons.
>
> First, when I was 21, I became a vegetarian. I remained so for 4 years. Two years into it, at age 23, I developed symptoms of OCD, for which I took Serzone. Two years after that, at 25, I was dx'd with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, treated, started eating meat again, and now at 27 no longer have the ocd symptoms and am not on meds.
>
> Meanwhile, a friend is developing some symptoms of psychosis (http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/social/20030617/msgs/237122.html), and this is approximately 7 months after she switched to a vegan diet. I wonder if she could be affected by an allergy to something that she commonly eats, or may be gluten intolerant and is 'filling up' on glutens much of the time?
>
> Maybe I could use suggest that she consider getting tested for these things? Even without the link, she has a very sensitive body and suffers from digestive problems.

Grains are certainly a central component of a vegan diet (without a whole lot of effort expended on their exclusion). As an hypothesis for the symptoms, gluten reactivity is quite a reasonable consideration. Moreover, the fact that you describe her as "sensitive" and having digestive problems, is corroborative in itself.

Lar

P.S. Hashimoto's is a very poorly understood syndrome. Just thinking through what I seem to understand about it, it is certainly possible that dietary factors (e.g. gluten reactivity) may trigger it. Hmmmm......

It took me ten seconds to find this:

Eur J Endocrinol. 2002 Apr;146(4):479-83.

Markers of potential coeliac disease in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

Valentino R, Savastano S, Maglio M, Paparo F, Ferrara F, Dorato M, Lombardi G, Troncone R.

CNR, Experimental Endocrinology and Oncology Center (CEOS), Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology and Pathology, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. troncone@unina.it

OBJECTIVE: Coeliac disease (CD) is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease. Gluten sensitivity represents a spectrum, with at one end cases with severe gluten-dependent enteropathy, and at the other subjects with minor signs of deranged mucosal immune response. The aim of this paper was to look for signs of minor small bowel injury and immunohistochemical markers of gluten sensitivity in a group of patients with Hashimoto's disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis without serological evidence of CD underwent immunohistochemical analysis of jejunal biopsies. RESULTS: In 6/14 cases (43%) an increased density of gammadelta T cell receptor bearing intra-epithelial lymphocytes was found. In 6/14 (43%) signs of mucosal T cell activation (presence of interleukin 2 (IL2) receptor (CD25) on lamina propria T cells and/or expression of human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules on crypt epithelial cells) were noted. In 4 out of 6 such cases, HLA haplotypes were described in association with CD. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis present signs of 'potential' CD and of activated mucosal T cell immunity. The gluten dependence of such findings remains to be ascertained.

 

Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems? Larry Hoover

Posted by johnj on July 1, 2003, at 17:39:08

In reply to Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems? bookgurl99, posted by Larry Hoover on July 1, 2003, at 11:22:38

Hi Larry,

How is everything going? On the road still? Thanks for this thread it is very interesting. I haven't been around very much since I have been feeling better and just have had many demands after work that I can't get to a computer :(

I have something interesting to add and ask you.
I have been told over the past few weeks that I look thin. I didn't want to make a fuss about it but I weighed myself...I have dropped 12 pounds, from 170 to 158. I am a skinny guy but I just thought it was due to sitting so much and not much excercise. Well, I was at my mom's house and she was telling me about a friend who they found out was allergic to wheat. I did some digging and I fit some criteria such as I have lost most of my ass and it hurts to sit.

I have noticed one thing and that is since I have added sublingual B-12 and a chewable B-complex, which I let dissolve in my mouth, I have felt really damn good and sleep is good too. I am still on 15 mg of remeron so I don't know if it was the remeron or the vitamins. I do suspect it is both, but maybe malabsorption could be a culprit.

The fact is without my fiber ceral, which contains wheat, I am very constipated. I will wait and see if I start to gain any weight back, but am at a loss at how to fix my diet so that I am regular. I allready eat lots of fruit and not much junk so I am at a loss. I mentioned this to my therapist and she wants to watch the weight issue closely. I just don't want to seem like I am searching for a biological reason for my depression. I know it is a big part but I don't even know if their are accurate tests for these things.

I am definately keeping tabs of my vitamins, they are essential. I think the sublingual types offer an advantage. What do you think?

Thanks and take care, and if you are on the road I hope you stay safe.

johnj

 

Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems?

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 1, 2003, at 17:51:50

In reply to Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems? Larry Hoover, posted by johnj on July 1, 2003, at 17:39:08

> I just don't want to seem like I am searching for a biological reason for my depression. I know it is a big part but I don't even know if their are accurate tests for these things.
>

Well, there _are_ accurate tests for wheat/gluten intolerance. My friend's brother was just diagnosed through a blood test and a biopsy to confirm. He was really glad, as he was becoming increasingly thin and having either constipation or having to run to the bathroom all the time.

Maybe if you got the wheat out of your diet, everything else would come out more .. . smoothly. :D

 

Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems?

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 3, 2003, at 13:41:01

In reply to Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems? Larry Hoover, posted by johnj on July 1, 2003, at 17:39:08

> Hi Larry,
>
> How is everything going? On the road still? Thanks for this thread it is very interesting. I haven't been around very much since I have been feeling better and just have had many demands after work that I can't get to a computer :(

Feeling better is :), not :(.

Ya, I'm about a third of the way through a six-week stretch on the road. Just got in.

> I have something interesting to add and ask you.
> I have been told over the past few weeks that I look thin. I didn't want to make a fuss about it but I weighed myself...I have dropped 12 pounds, from 170 to 158. I am a skinny guy but I just thought it was due to sitting so much and not much excercise. Well, I was at my mom's house and she was telling me about a friend who they found out was allergic to wheat. I did some digging and I fit some criteria such as I have lost most of my ass and it hurts to sit.
>
> I have noticed one thing and that is since I have added sublingual B-12 and a chewable B-complex, which I let dissolve in my mouth, I have felt really damn good and sleep is good too.

Good news.

> I am still on 15 mg of remeron so I don't know if it was the remeron or the vitamins.

I'd go with the vitamins, but hey!, I'm biased.

>I do suspect it is both, but maybe malabsorption could be a culprit.

I think malabsorption is far more common than everybody thinks it is.

> The fact is without my fiber ceral, which contains wheat, I am very constipated.

There are lots of ways to get fiber without resorting to whole grains. Psyllium (Metamucil) is soluble fiber.

>I will wait and see if I start to gain any weight back, but am at a loss at how to fix my diet so that I am regular. I allready eat lots of fruit and not much junk so I am at a loss. I mentioned this to my therapist and she wants to watch the weight issue closely. I just don't want to seem like I am searching for a biological reason for my depression.

???? Why?

>I know it is a big part but I don't even know if their are accurate tests for these things.

If you keep losing weight, you need to see a doctor for an examination.

> I am definately keeping tabs of my vitamins, they are essential. I think the sublingual types offer an advantage. What do you think?

Sublingual forms are advantageous if you have intestinal malabsorption, or if you've been chronically depleted. For e.g. NADH, it's to avoid digestion (either sublingual or enteric-coated, to avoid stomach acid).

> Thanks and take care, and if you are on the road I hope you stay safe.
>
> johnj

Well, I'm always safe. It's the other drivers.....

Glad you're feeling better, John.

Lar

 

Re: exorphins from grains and milk

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 4, 2003, at 19:43:42

In reply to Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems?, posted by bookgurl99 on July 1, 2003, at 17:51:50

I've just done a couple hours of web-searching on exorphins, protein fragments from common foods which have opioid-receptor activity.

There are far more of these peptides (proteins) than I had previously thought, and they are found in other foods, too. I'm going to have to give some serious thought to trying a grain/dairy exclusion diet, just to see if it affects my sense of well-being. My sister is a celiac, so it is quite possible I share that genetic trait.

What was most disconcerting about my search results, however, wasn't just discovering how commonplace these exorphin peptides are. No. What was incredibly disconcerting was discovering that food industry scientists discuss ways to purposefully process foodstuffs in such a way as to maximize the exorphin content. They even created a possible name for these derivatives, "formones", shortened from food hormones. It makes the food ingredient "modified milk ingredients" take on a new, and scary, meaning. Just what the hell is really being added when "modified milk ingredients" are an ingredient in a processed foodstuff?

I'm troubled by this subject right now. I'm going to go watch TV.

Lar

 

Re: exorphins from grains and milk

Posted by Bookgurl99 on July 4, 2003, at 23:08:09

In reply to Re: exorphins from grains and milk, posted by Larry Hoover on July 4, 2003, at 19:43:42

Larry,

this is quite fascinating. i never knew that exorphins existed. makes me wonder if some of the 'no-grain/low-grain' new age-y folks have been right all along.

books

p.s. now relax. :D

 

Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression Larry Hoover

Posted by galkeepinon on July 5, 2003, at 1:55:49

In reply to Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression McPac, posted by Larry Hoover on July 1, 2003, at 9:31:27

hi, is celiac disease the same as wheat gluten intolerance? I was wondering if you had a link where you got this info-I am very interested in this. I was told I may have it and wanted to read up. I will also do a search.
Any help would be great.
thanks!


> > Lar, MIGHT the easier solution be HEALING the leaky gut in the first place (and then being able to eat whatever WITHOUT the reaction)? Another site on-line (Dr. Stoll) harps on this constantly....he (and other followers) STRONGLY emphasizes SKILLED RELAXATION as one of THE main components of healing a leaky gut AND overall mental/physical health. Have you ever looked into Skilled Relaxation Lar? Many SWEAR by it. Another HUGE problem he talks about constantly is "bracing" (don't know if you're aware of this concept). Sooooooo many ideas/possible causes/possible solutions/theories, etc.....you'd have to live to be 1,000 yrs old to try them all out! Thoughts Lar? Thanks!!
>
> Just for the record, this Dr. Stoll is not the Dr. Stoll of fish oil fame.
>
> I've read through most of the entire site, and my gut reaction is "fringe", i.e. the fringe of reality. Some of the concepts are bizarre, like the idea that cerebro-spinal fluid is circulated via pulses of the skull bones. Gahh!
>
> Now, the utility of meditation in controlling stress is without question, IMHO. Although I've not heard the term Skilled Relaxation before, I'm certainly familiar with the outcome. However, I don't see how it could possibly cure leaky gut syndrome.
>
> Lar

 

Re: Celiac disease and depression..bookgurl99

Posted by Deb R on July 5, 2003, at 4:25:05

In reply to Re: Celiac disease and depression, posted by bookgurl99 on July 1, 2003, at 1:10:33

Hi Bookgurl and thanks for your post, I get more and more hopeful the more I read. I know I shouldnt get too excited about it all, but it just seems to me that there is something in this.

Deb.

 

Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems?..all...

Posted by Deb R on July 5, 2003, at 4:39:04

In reply to Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems?, posted by Larry Hoover on July 3, 2003, at 13:41:01

Hi to everyone who has written posts - I have been away from the 'net' for a few days and was very happy to see so many posts and lots of info. I have copied all the posts and will have another good read...thanks everyone so much.

Will be in touch,

Deb.

 

Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 5, 2003, at 8:32:45

In reply to Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression Larry Hoover, posted by galkeepinon on July 5, 2003, at 1:55:49

> hi, is celiac disease the same as wheat gluten intolerance?

I would say they're the same thing, only celiac disease is diagnosed by microscopic examination of the intestinal wall following endoscopic biopsy. There have to be certain pathological changes in the cell structures before a *doctor* will call it celiac sprue. You don't have to have severe symptoms to be intolerant of gluten.

>I was wondering if you had a link where you got this info-I am very interested in this.

There's all sorts of info out there. Try www.gluten-free.org

One warning. There is a radical fringe in the diet world. Keep your bullshit detector operating.

>I was told I may have it and wanted to read up. I will also do a search.
> Any help would be great.
> thanks!

Plug gluten and celiac into Google, and you could spend weeks checking out each link. Gluten-free is a nice starting point.

Lar

 

Re: exorphins from grains and milk Bookgurl99

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 5, 2003, at 8:37:25

In reply to Re: exorphins from grains and milk, posted by Bookgurl99 on July 4, 2003, at 23:08:09

> Larry,
>
> this is quite fascinating. i never knew that exorphins existed.

Neither did I, before this week, though I seem to recall reading an article or two in the past, which I probably dismissed. Something about exorphins being Mother Nature's way of addicting babies to their mothers, as a bonding mechanism. Bogus arguments like that.

> makes me wonder if some of the 'no-grain/low-grain' new age-y folks have been right all along.
>
> books

They may have had the right idea, but for the wrong reasons, IMHO. ;-)

> p.s. now relax. :D

Ya. I just hate the idea that food processors could hide behind the "natural source" concept, as exorphins are already present in the raw materials. They're not added, but they can be enhanced. Kind of like monosodium glutamate hiding in the rubric "natural flavour". It's willfully deceptive.

Lar

 

Deb, here's another article Deb R

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 5, 2003, at 9:12:29

In reply to Re: vegetarianism/mental health problems?..all..., posted by Deb R on July 5, 2003, at 4:39:04

When I read an article like this, and consider that the standard treatment is still antipsychotic medication (with all those adverse effects), I just don't know what to say......

Schizophr Bull. 1988;14(4):489-94.

Genetic hypothesis of idiopathic schizophrenia: its exorphin connection.

Dohan FC.

Medical College of Pennsylvania, Eastern Pennsylvania, Psychiatric Institute, Philadelphia 19129.

This brief overview proposes a testable oligogenic model of the inheritance of susceptibility to idiopathic schizophrenia: "abnormal" genes at each of a few complementary loci. The model is based on my assumptions as to the likely genetic abnormalities at possibly four or five interacting loci that would permit exorphins, the opioid peptides from some food proteins, especially glutens and possibly caseins, to go from gut to brain and cause symptoms of schizophrenia. Exorphins may reach the brain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in harmful amounts because of their genetically increased, receptor-mediated transcellular passage across the gut epithelial barrier plus decreased catabolism by genetically defective enzymes. A schizophrenia-specific, genetically enhanced affinity for exorphins by opioid receptors influencing dopaminergic and other neurons would permit sustained dysfunction at low CSF exorphin concentrations. Tests of each postulated genetic abnormality are suggested. This model is supported by a variety of evidence, including a significant effect of gluten or its absence on relapsed schizophrenic patients, the high correlation of changes in first admission rates for schizophrenia with changes in grain consumption rates, and the rarity of cases of schizophrenia where grains and milk are rare.

 

Thanks Lar-appreciate it! (nm)

Posted by galkeepinon on July 5, 2003, at 15:13:29

In reply to Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression, posted by Larry Hoover on July 5, 2003, at 8:32:45

 

paging Lar Hoover-celiac/gluten free disease......

Posted by galkeepinon on July 7, 2003, at 13:44:27

In reply to Thanks Lar-appreciate it! (nm), posted by galkeepinon on July 5, 2003, at 15:13:29

hi, I did some searching and man I think I have the gluten-intolerance/celiac disease for sure. What amazes me though, is the limited or should I say VERY limited amount of foods one is able to consume in having this condition. I've got some re-vamping to do with my diet.
Thanks for turning me on to this. I have got a lot of info I didn't know existed.
gal

 

Re: paging Lar Hoover-celiac/gluten free disease...... galkeepinon

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 12, 2003, at 7:23:31

In reply to paging Lar Hoover-celiac/gluten free disease......, posted by galkeepinon on July 7, 2003, at 13:44:27

> hi, I did some searching and man I think I have the gluten-intolerance/celiac disease for sure. What amazes me though, is the limited or should I say VERY limited amount of foods one is able to consume in having this condition. I've got some re-vamping to do with my diet.

Ya, I hear you. You may want to take a look at what's called the paleo diet, supposedly the same sorts of things our prehistoric ancestors ate. Kind of hunter-gatherer attitude. The reason I'm saying that is it's already been thought out, telling you what you can eat, which may be easier than trying to eliminate foods from your present diet.

> Thanks for turning me on to this. I have got a lot of info I didn't know existed.
> gal

You're welcome.....but it was Deb's thread. I'm thankful to her for bringing it up, because it is forcing me to face the issue as well. Untreated celiac disease is associated with increased risk of digestive system cancer, so it's anything but trivial.

Lar

 

Re: paging Lar Hoover-celiac/gluten free disease...... Larry Hoover

Posted by galkeepinon on July 12, 2003, at 18:20:58

In reply to Re: paging Lar Hoover-celiac/gluten free disease...... galkeepinon, posted by Larry Hoover on July 12, 2003, at 7:23:31

> > You're welcome.....but it was Deb's thread. I'm thankful to her for bringing it up, because it is forcing me to face the issue as well. Untreated celiac disease is associated with increased risk of digestive system cancer, so it's anything but trivial.

Kudos to Deb-Deb, thank you so much! I am as well thankful. This issue is anything but trivial Lar, I agree with you, and I intend to do more research on it. I truly, personally believe that the kind of hunter-gatherer attitude is the way to go concerning this painful, complicated condition. I will post if I find anything I feel would benefit others here. Colon cancer (AKA digestive system cancer,etc.) is so common-yet not a lot of people are aware of preventative measures, causes, etc.
It's a shame. How it affects our moods is a whole other story.


Gal

hi, I did some searching and man I think I have the gluten-intolerance/celiac disease for sure. What amazes me though, is the limited or should I say VERY limited amount of foods one is able to consume in having this condition. I've got some re-vamping to do with my diet.
>
> Ya, I hear you. You may want to take a look at what's called the paleo diet, supposedly the same sorts of things our prehistoric ancestors ate. Kind of hunter-gatherer attitude. The reason I'm saying that is it's already been thought out, telling you what you can eat, which may be easier than trying to eliminate foods from your present diet.
>
> > Thanks for turning me on to this. I have got a lot of info I didn't know existed.
> > gal
>
> You're welcome.....but it was Deb's thread. I'm thankful to her for bringing it up, because it is forcing me to face the issue as well. Untreated celiac disease is associated with increased risk of digestive system cancer, so it's anything but trivial.
>
> Lar

 

Re: Larry -

Posted by Deb R on July 13, 2003, at 4:29:02

In reply to Re: paging Lar Hoover-celiac/gluten free disease...... galkeepinon, posted by Larry Hoover on July 12, 2003, at 7:23:31

Hi Larry,

Thanks for all your input to this thread, I really have appreciated your help. There is a lot of info out there, I went to the library and found a pile of books - including recipe books, so that was helpful. I have printed off your posts and it is all becoming more clear in my mind. Even if Mums symptoms are eased by 20% by a change in diet, that would be just fantastic.

Mum is having the endoscopy in August, so we will see. Good luck to you......and thanks again,

Deb.

 

Re: Larry - Deb R

Posted by Larry Hoover on July 13, 2003, at 7:52:58

In reply to Re: Larry - , posted by Deb R on July 13, 2003, at 4:29:02

> Hi Larry,
>
> Thanks for all your input to this thread, I really have appreciated your help. There is a lot of info out there, I went to the library and found a pile of books - including recipe books, so that was helpful. I have printed off your posts and it is all becoming more clear in my mind. Even if Mums symptoms are eased by 20% by a change in diet, that would be just fantastic.
>
> Mum is having the endoscopy in August, so we will see. Good luck to you......and thanks again,
>
> Deb.

You're welcome, Deb.

Don't forget, this is a genetic trait, usually. Your mom may not be the only one to benefit from a restriction diet.

All the best,
Lar

 

Re: Larry -

Posted by Deb R on July 14, 2003, at 7:59:34

In reply to Re: Larry - Deb R, posted by Larry Hoover on July 13, 2003, at 7:52:58

Hi Larry,

Yes it is a bit scary to think of the genetic implications - we have three kids, plus I have 2 sisters and a brother, and they all have kids....and on it goes.

Good luck with your search too Larry...I will keep in touch..

Deb.

 

Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression

Posted by ValG on August 31, 2003, at 10:11:11

In reply to Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression Larry Hoover, posted by galkeepinon on July 5, 2003, at 1:55:49

Hi, I am new to this gluten-free way of thinking. I was just diagnosed with a thyroid problem, and have antibodies indicating Hashimotos. I have done alot of research, and found some interesting studies tying thyroid to celiac/gluten intolerance. I was just put on Synthroid 50mcg 2 wks ago. I also stopped eating wheat that day. In just 2 wks. I feel like a new person. (The one day I slipped up and ate pizza, I felt depressed within 30 min. of eating it.)

I noticed someone else on the boards here with Hashis, trying the gluten-free route.

 

Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression ValG

Posted by Larry Hoover on September 1, 2003, at 14:22:05

In reply to Re: Larry, Re: Celiac disease and depression, posted by ValG on August 31, 2003, at 10:11:11

> Hi, I am new to this gluten-free way of thinking. I was just diagnosed with a thyroid problem, and have antibodies indicating Hashimotos. I have done alot of research, and found some interesting studies tying thyroid to celiac/gluten intolerance.

You're quite right about that.

> I was just put on Synthroid 50mcg 2 wks ago. I also stopped eating wheat that day. In just 2 wks. I feel like a new person. (The one day I slipped up and ate pizza, I felt depressed within 30 min. of eating it.)
>
> I noticed someone else on the boards here with Hashis, trying the gluten-free route.

Thanks for refreshing this thread. I think gluten-intolerance is more prevalent than "standard medical wisdom" acknowledges.

Lar

 

Re: exorphins from grains and milk - NALTREXONE?

Posted by Laurie Beth on October 4, 2005, at 14:37:58

In reply to Re: exorphins from grains and milk, posted by Larry Hoover on July 4, 2003, at 19:43:42

I have wondering for about this for almost a year. As a child, I had what in retrospect seems like an addiction to foods with gluten, casein (a protein in milk), and sugar, so much so that I ended up developing very selective eating habits. This recently led me to do my own research and I found that autism is linked with such selective eating habits, and that there are those who think that some forms of autism are actually caused by the excess opiates coming from incomplete breakdown of gluten and casein flooding the quickly growing brain of a 1-year-old child. Although I'm not autistic or schizophrenic, I have a history of dysthymia and at least 2 MDEs, so I can't help but wonder....

I've tried a casein-free, gluten-free diet for several days in a row (which is difficult, because these are major sources of protein for me), and while I probably felt more clear-headed and less sleepy, I was not happy ... if anything, just spent more energy craving all the foods I couldn't have. This, then, makes me wonder: if I'm actually addicted to these exorphins, is there a reason I'm addicted? Was I "self-medicating" with these foods? (And, for that matter, even if I wasn't initially self-medicating, I'm sure I was given these foods as a baby and young child ... what happens to a brain that's exposed to (presumably very low levels of) these exorphins throughout childhood, and is there any way to recover?)

And, on top of that, apparently the gluten source opioids stay in the body for up to 8 months (measured in urine 8 months after a child goes completely gluten-free) or even more for an adult. No way I kind stay on this kind of diet for 8 months, just to see if maybe I'd come out happy in the end.

Anyway, finally to my question:
My understanding is that casomorphins, at least, may be partially blocked by opioid antagonists. Could this be a reason that naltrexone seems to help with the depression of some?

 

gluten / wheat / depression / addicition

Posted by puravida on May 19, 2006, at 20:35:13

In reply to Re: exorphins from grains and milk - NALTREXONE?, posted by Laurie Beth on October 4, 2005, at 14:37:58

Wondering if anyone is around that hes had success with a gluten fre diet lifting depression? My dad had celiacs, I had a blood test and they say I don't have it. I'd like to quit eating wheat and sugar because I think it will help me, but I can't seem to get more than 2 days strung together without convincing myself I can eat whatever and it won't make any difference. I quit drinking about 4 months ago and I feel I am going through the addiction thing all over again, but with food.

Anyone have a similar story? I'd like to find a goos support group, but can't seem to find a good fit yet.


This is the end of the thread.


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Medication | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

Script revised: February 4, 2008
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-17 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.