Psycho-Babble Alternative Thread 1115445

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Everyone should be microdosing lithium

Posted by Hugh on June 5, 2021, at 10:32:40

This appeared in Time magazine in 1971:

By legend Texans are a grandiose breed with more than the natural share of megalomaniacs. But University of Texas Biochemist Earl B. Dawson thinks that he detects an uncommon pocket of psychological adjustment around El Paso. The reason, says Dawson, lies in the deep wells from which the city draws its water supply.

According to Dawson's studies of urine samples from 3,000 Texans, El Paso's water is heavily laced with lithium, a tranquilizing chemical widely used in the treatment of manic depression and other psychiatric disorders. He notes that Dallas, which has low lithium levels because it draws its water from surface supplies, has "about seven times more admissions to state mental hospitals than El Paso." But state mental health officials point out that the mental hospital closest to Dallas is 35 miles from the city, while the one nearest El Paso is 350 miles away--and the long distance could affect admission figures.

But FBI statistics show that while Dallas had 5,970 known crimes per 100,000 population last year, El Paso had 2,889 per 100,000. Dallas (pop. 844,000) had 242 murders, El Paso (pop. 323,000) only 13. Dr. Frederick Goodwin, an expert on lithium studies for the National Institute of Mental Health, doubts that "lithium has these magical properties in the population." Others are not so sure. If lithium does have anything to do with the relative peace in El Paso, what would it do for other cities like New York and Chicago?

This appeared in The New York Times in 2014:

Although it seems strange that the microscopic amounts of lithium found in groundwater could have any substantial medical impact, the more scientists look for such effects, the more they seem to discover. Evidence is slowly accumulating that relatively tiny doses of lithium can have beneficial effects. They appear to decrease suicide rates significantly and may even promote brain health and improve mood.

Yet despite the studies demonstrating the benefits of relatively high natural lithium levels present in the drinking water of certain communities, few seem to be aware of its potential. Intermittently, stories appear in the scientific journals and media, but they seem to have little traction in the medical community or with the general public.

When I recently attended a psychopharmacology course in which these lithium studies were reviewed, virtually none of the psychiatrists present had been aware of them.

Researchers began to ask whether low levels of lithium might correlate with poor behavioral outcomes in humans. In 1990, a study was published looking at 27 Texas counties with a variety of lithium levels in their water. The authors discovered that people whose water had the least amount of lithium had significantly greater levels of suicide, homicide and rape than the people whose water had the higher levels of lithium. The group whose water had the highest lithium level had nearly 40 percent fewer suicides than that with the lowest lithium level.

Almost 20 years later, a Japanese study that looked at 18 municipalities with more than a million inhabitants over a five-year period confirmed the earlier study's finding: Suicide rates were inversely correlated with the lithium content in the local water supply.

More recently, there have been corroborating studies in Greece and Austria.

Trying to make sense of their results, the authors of the Japanese study speculated that lithium exposure, even in these tiny amounts, might actually be neuroprotective or even enhance the growth of neurons. Other studies have supported their speculation; lithium appears to promote the health, growth and resilience of neurons, reducing stress-induced damage.

Dr. Nassir Ghaemi, a professor of psychiatry at Tufts University School of Medicine and one of the most active and informed proponents of lithium in the medical community, notes: "Lithium is, by far, the most proven drug to keep neurons alive, in animals and in humans, consistently and with many replicated studies." And, he added, "If lithium prevents dementia, then we may have overlooked a very simple means of preventing a major public health problem."

When the data from the Japanese study was reanalyzed in a second publication, the authors concluded that those people with higher levels of lithium in their water supply had lower levels of "all-cause mortality." Why have these findings been so little discussed in the medical, psychiatric and public health communities?

Some scientists have, in fact, proposed that lithium be recognized as an essential trace element nutrient. Who knows what the impact on our society would be if micro-dose lithium were again part of our standard nutritional fare? What if it were added back to soft drinks or popular vitamin brands or even put into the water supply? The research to date strongly suggests that suicide levels would be reduced, and even perhaps other violent acts. And maybe the dementia rate would decline. We don't know because the research hasn't been done.

For the public health issue of suicide prevention alone, it seems imperative that such studies be conducted. In 2011, suicide was the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Research on a simple element like lithium that has been around as a medication for over half a century and as a drink for millenniums may not seem like a high priority, but it should be.

 

Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 6, 2021, at 1:15:23

In reply to Everyone should be microdosing lithium, posted by Hugh on June 5, 2021, at 10:32:40

I have been microdosing Lithium for 8 or 9 years.

 

Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium

Posted by Hugh on June 6, 2021, at 14:16:28

In reply to Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium, posted by Lamdage22 on June 6, 2021, at 1:15:23

I microdosed lithium orotate and lithium aspartate for years. Recently I switched to ionic lithium chloride. I like this form of lithium the best. Its effects are more noticeable. This is the brand I take:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HDPSHXC

 

Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 8, 2021, at 23:51:02

In reply to Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium, posted by Hugh on June 6, 2021, at 14:16:28

How so?

> Its effects are more noticeable.

 

Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium Lamdage22

Posted by Hugh on June 10, 2021, at 9:54:59

In reply to Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium, posted by Lamdage22 on June 8, 2021, at 23:51:02

Ionic lithium chloride gives me a subtle feeling of well-being. It makes me feel sturdier. My allergies have improved since I started taking it.

 

Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium

Posted by Lamdage22 on July 3, 2021, at 3:07:33

In reply to Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium Lamdage22, posted by Hugh on June 10, 2021, at 9:54:59

Can ionic lithium chloride replace low dose lithium carbonate? Anti-suicidal and neuroprotective?

 

Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium Lamdage22

Posted by Hugh on July 14, 2021, at 15:13:38

In reply to Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium, posted by Lamdage22 on July 3, 2021, at 3:07:33

For a 70 kg adult the recommended doses of 450 to 900 mg lithium carbonate/day are equivalent to 6.43 and 12.86 mg lithium carbonate/kg bw/day, respectively. These values are equivalent to 516 -- 1033 mg lithium chloride/day or 7.38 -- 14.75 mg lithium chloride/kg bw/day or 1.2 mg Lithium/ kg bw/day and 2.4 mg lithium /kg bw/day.

https://echa.europa.eu/registration-dossier/-/registered-dossier/5223/7/2/2

 

Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium

Posted by Lamdage22 on July 15, 2021, at 2:55:00

In reply to Re: Everyone should be microdosing lithium Lamdage22, posted by Hugh on July 14, 2021, at 15:13:38

Okay, I will check that out but right now I am on a trial of 5-HTP. I wouldn't be able to tell if the ionic lithium chloride is better for me than carbonate.


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