Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1079538

Shown: posts 1 to 22 of 22. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 8, 2015, at 13:37:10

For a start.

You may think your only way out is a med, but this might not be true.

Just adding my 2 cents.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22

Posted by SLS on June 8, 2015, at 14:31:13

In reply to Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 8, 2015, at 13:37:10

> For a start.
>
> You may think your only way out is a med, but this might not be true.
>
> Just adding my 2 cents.

There is something to be said for homeostasis. The whole point of staying on a set of medications for longer than just a few weeks is to give the brain a chance to react to the provocation of drug exposure. It is possible that you are feeling better for NOT changing your medication rather than some spontaneous remission. If it were me, I would not make any changes for now.

Good luck.


- Scott

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Phillipa on June 8, 2015, at 16:56:05

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22, posted by SLS on June 8, 2015, at 14:31:13

Meds don't always work even after trial and error as also could be either physical and undiagnosed or the way one thinks.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Phillipa

Posted by SLS on June 8, 2015, at 21:48:01

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Phillipa on June 8, 2015, at 16:56:05

> Meds don't always work even after trial and error

Yes. This is unfortunate.

> as also could be either physical and undiagnosed or the way one thinks.

It is important to have a good diagnostician differentiate between psychogenic versus biogenic depressions. It is not good practice to assume that one has a psychobiological mood disorder simply because they say, "I'm depressed." It is probably reasonable to suspect that there is an interplay between the biological and the psychological in many cases of depression.


- Scott

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 4:07:36

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Phillipa, posted by SLS on June 8, 2015, at 21:48:01

Effexor and Lithium Orotate are definitely anti suicidal.

Im not changing those.

I only gradually reducing the AAPs as my psychiatrist recommends. Very slowly though.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 4:26:07

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 4:07:36

I was probably homesick and that was awful for me.

Even the psychiatrist in the SD hospital said that i might be.

When a psychiatrist admits that there are non-biological causes for your suffering, its probably true.

I want to encourage people to become proactive about their lives.
http://media.swingpal.com/c0ed3450-efc5-0132-f19c-123139153ee4.mp4
Maybe you are homesick, you lack (female or male) companionship, you need a training partner in the gym.

You need peace and unity with your family. Social support.

Try to take care of those things. When you obsess about meds you may lose touch with them!

It is unlikely that medication can make up for all of that. And it shouldnt. You need to notice them.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 5:43:30

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 4:26:07

I think you guys are pretty biased that meds are so helpful.

You dont have an objective way of looking at it.

They can be helpful but also harmful.

 

Lou's urgent warning-mydtusfrehyhorbldeth SLS

Posted by Lou Pilder on June 9, 2015, at 7:12:21

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22, posted by SLS on June 8, 2015, at 14:31:13

> > For a start.
> >
> > You may think your only way out is a med, but this might not be true.
> >
> > Just adding my 2 cents.
>
> There is something to be said for homeostasis. The whole point of staying on a set of medications for longer than just a few weeks is to give the brain a chance to react to the provocation of drug exposure. It is possible that you are feeling better for NOT changing your medication rather than some spontaneous remission. If it were me, I would not make any changes for now.
>
> Good luck.
>
>
> - Scott

Friends,
It is written here,[...The whole point of staying on a set of medications for longer than just a few weeks is to give the brain a chance to react to the provocation of drug exposure...].
What could one be led to think by what Scott has posted here? For he uses the concept of {the whole point} and {to give the brain a chance to react} which are concepts that if specified as to what they entail, could be different from what you are believing as they stand.
For instance, {whose} whole point? And what reaction does the brain do to having a chemical penetrating it's cells? Are there scientific answers to what Scott has posted here as to what could be thought from what he has posted?
You see, psychotropic drugs are manufactured so that the chemicals in them go through the cell membranes and can cause damage or death to those cells. This is one reason many of these drugs are fluorinated, for by fluorinating the drug, the chemicals can penetrate easier and deeper into the brain cells. The chemicals can also disrupt the nerves functional ability by short-circuiting the chemical transmission of nerve impulses that could result in death or disease such as cancer and blood diseases as the chemicals enter the bone marrow and blood cells. The chemicals can injure the brain and cause tardive dyskinesia among other neurological damage to the nervous system and brain and injure the pancreas to cause diabetes and injure the liver to cause death by liver failure. and the longer the chemicals have the opportunity to invade the cells by infusing through the cell membranes, the more likely your luck will run out to escape death, addiction or a life-ruining condition.
You see, the chemicals in the drugs cause the brain to want to keep having the drug and when the chemicals are withdrawn, the brain does react by wanting the chemicals to be kept coming which is in the science of addiction. And if the chemicals stop, then the horrific withdrawal symptoms could arise, and even the compulsion to kill yourself during this time when the brain reacts to not having the drug. The brain did have a chance to react and addiction is one way the brain reacts. Do you want that?
And you mothers. Be not deceived by what you read here by Scott if you are trying to make a more informed decision as to drug your child or not in collaboration with the drug companies and the psychiatrists that are in concert with them. For your child could be made to suffer a horrible death by them.
Lou

 

Lou's urgent warning-rowpehydoap

Posted by Lou Pilder on June 9, 2015, at 7:57:59

In reply to Lou's urgent warning-mydtusfrehyhorbldeth SLS, posted by Lou Pilder on June 9, 2015, at 7:12:21

> > > For a start.
> > >
> > > You may think your only way out is a med, but this might not be true.
> > >
> > > Just adding my 2 cents.
> >
> > There is something to be said for homeostasis. The whole point of staying on a set of medications for longer than just a few weeks is to give the brain a chance to react to the provocation of drug exposure. It is possible that you are feeling better for NOT changing your medication rather than some spontaneous remission. If it were me, I would not make any changes for now.
> >
> > Good luck.
> >
> >
> > - Scott
>
> Friends,
> It is written here,[...The whole point of staying on a set of medications for longer than just a few weeks is to give the brain a chance to react to the provocation of drug exposure...].
> What could one be led to think by what Scott has posted here? For he uses the concept of {the whole point} and {to give the brain a chance to react} which are concepts that if specified as to what they entail, could be different from what you are believing as they stand.
> For instance, {whose} whole point? And what reaction does the brain do to having a chemical penetrating it's cells? Are there scientific answers to what Scott has posted here as to what could be thought from what he has posted?
> You see, psychotropic drugs are manufactured so that the chemicals in them go through the cell membranes and can cause damage or death to those cells. This is one reason many of these drugs are fluorinated, for by fluorinating the drug, the chemicals can penetrate easier and deeper into the brain cells. The chemicals can also disrupt the nerves functional ability by short-circuiting the chemical transmission of nerve impulses that could result in death or disease such as cancer and blood diseases as the chemicals enter the bone marrow and blood cells. The chemicals can injure the brain and cause tardive dyskinesia among other neurological damage to the nervous system and brain and injure the pancreas to cause diabetes and injure the liver to cause death by liver failure. and the longer the chemicals have the opportunity to invade the cells by infusing through the cell membranes, the more likely your luck will run out to escape death, addiction or a life-ruining condition.
> You see, the chemicals in the drugs cause the brain to want to keep having the drug and when the chemicals are withdrawn, the brain does react by wanting the chemicals to be kept coming which is in the science of addiction. And if the chemicals stop, then the horrific withdrawal symptoms could arise, and even the compulsion to kill yourself during this time when the brain reacts to not having the drug. The brain did have a chance to react and addiction is one way the brain reacts. Do you want that?
> And you mothers. Be not deceived by what you read here by Scott if you are trying to make a more informed decision as to drug your child or not in collaboration with the drug companies and the psychiatrists that are in concert with them. For your child could be made to suffer a horrible death by them.
> Lou

Friends,
If you have read my first post here, I hope that you can understand what happens to your brain when these chemicals, that are allowed to be called medicines here, and are allowed to be promoted as such here by a psychiatrist and those that are in concert with him here.
Thousands of people are killed by these drugs each and every month. And more become addicted to the drugs because they could be made to believe that the drugs have to be taken for weeks in order for the brain to somehow make them work. But what happens by taking them for weeks, is that the brain can become addicted to the drug. Now the psychiatrist and the drug companies could have a patient for life. And when the first drug stops working, another drug is given that takes its place and another and another and then combinations of the drugs from the psychiatrist and the drug companies and then life-ruining conditions and addictions become likely so that you could be made to suffer a horrible death by them.
Let us look at a lawyer that is trying to stop the deaths and addictions from the drug companies and the psychiatrists that are in concert with them. Do you want to be in concert here with those that cause thousands of deaths each and every month? Do you really believe the propaganda of psychiatry and what Scott is allowed to post with impunity as being supportive, for support takes precedence, and the drug companies to think that you have to take these drugs for weeks in order for them to work? What you get is addiction after weeks of the brain being infused with chemicals that are nerve agents.
Let us look at this video to understand what happens when you take these drugs for weeks.
Lou
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2S5qUxGYJs

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22

Posted by SLS on June 9, 2015, at 10:15:17

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 5:43:30

> I think you guys are pretty biased that meds are so helpful.
>
> You dont have an objective way of looking at it.
>
> They can be helpful but also harmful.
>

Lamdage, I don't think it is helpful to lump everyone together when each of us has their own conceptualization or model of psychiatry. You said in a previous post that if a psychiatrist posits a psychological explanation for one's description of depression, it is probably true. Again, I don't think this is a helpful generalization to make. Thinking this way leaves you just as vulnerable to misdiagnosis as assuming all mood disorders are exclusively biogenic. The brain and mind are virtually inextricable. Very often, I think that it is a vicious dynamic that promotes a reinforcement (positive feedback) of disturbances in mood. The psychological might trigger the biological, which further influences depressive thinking, which worsens the biological dysregulation, etc. It is no secret among those who keep current with the ongoing research into neuropsychobiology that an abusive or negative environment changes brain structure and function. If the generalizations you propose onto others were, instead, directed toward yourself only as an individual, that might be an accurate description and very helpful.

My opinion of your current improvement is that it is too early to "rock the boat" and disrupt your brain chemistry again. If you remain well for six months or more, I think that would be a better time to discontinue Abilify or make other changes. If you suffer a deterioration immediately upon discontinuing Abilify, one could make an argument that this is more of a withdrawal rebound than a relapse. However, if the trend is towards further worsening over the second and third weeks, I think that suggests reinstating Abilify, or perhaps even trying cariprazine should it become available by then. Cariprazine is much like Abilify, except, on paper, it should be a stronger antidepressant augmenter due to its greater selectivity for dopamine D3 receptors in limbic structures. That is my hope, anyway.

I would enjoy your current relief for awhile before risking feeling worse again.

Just a few thoughts...


- Scott

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:27:31

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22, posted by SLS on June 9, 2015, at 10:15:17

I dont even take Abilify.

Do you think i want to risk my health with AAPs?

What is feeling well for a few months tops worth if you have a stroke and your life is pure hell? Diabetes?

My Psychiatrist says the same thing.

You and your meds and psychiatric procedures. Disencouraging people who actually find a way out.

Admittedly, i dont take advice from people who voluntarily submit to a procedure like DBS.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:27:59

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:27:31

or at least want to.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:31:03

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:27:59

Six months is a very long time.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:34:21

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:31:03

I dont count that as supportive.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22

Posted by SLS on June 9, 2015, at 13:37:13

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:27:31

> I dont even take Abilify.

I apologize for misremembering.

> Do you think i want to risk my health with AAPs?

Let's hope that you don't find yourself in the position of needing to try such alternatives.

> What is feeling well for a few months tops worth if you have a stroke and your life is pure hell? Diabetes?

You have misunderstood just about everything I have written here.

> My Psychiatrist says the same thing.

He is entitled to have opinions that differ from those of other psychiatrists.

> You and your meds and psychiatric procedures. Disencouraging people who actually find a way out.
>
> Admittedly, i dont take advice from people who voluntarily submit to a procedure like DBS.

I will remember everything you have said here.

Good luck.


- Scott

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:46:37

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22, posted by SLS on June 9, 2015, at 13:37:13

The fact is, we dont know.

You rather err on the side of trusting organized psychiatry and trying everything,

i rather err on the side of not swallowing it. Literally.

Fact is i am doing well. Very well.

I think you are heading towards a big mistake and thats why i sound harsh.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 14:02:12

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 13:46:37

And i do think that you are leading others on the wrong path.

It strikes me as very destructive what you are doing with yourself.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 15:32:46

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 14:02:12

Another thing is:

We are not scientists.

And even the scientists dont know what they are talking about or what they are doing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZCgWmose3c

Its disgusting."they didnt know what they were doing. Nothing much has changed by the way."

Audience:" HAHAHAHA!"

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22

Posted by Phillipa on June 9, 2015, at 17:33:32

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 9, 2015, at 15:32:46

Lamdage, have you currently stopped your antipsychotic? And are you in the USA or back in Germany? Thanks Phillipa

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 10, 2015, at 2:24:10

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that? Lamdage22, posted by Phillipa on June 9, 2015, at 17:33:32

> Lamdage, have you currently stopped your antipsychotic? And are you in the USA or back in Germany? Thanks Phillipa

I am in Germany.

I take two APs: Seroquel and Zyprexa.

I have reduced the Zyprexa from 17,5 to 15mg about two months ago. I want to wein myself off as much as i can.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 10, 2015, at 2:24:53

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 10, 2015, at 2:24:10

I cant wake up in the morning because of the APs.

 

Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?

Posted by Lamdage22 on June 10, 2015, at 3:44:01

In reply to Re: Getting better with NO med changes. Hows that?, posted by Lamdage22 on June 10, 2015, at 2:24:10

The US really didnt work out for me. I even had an Infraction with the law while psychotic on Nardil.

So there is lots of bad memories that time needs to heal.


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