Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 474989

Shown: posts 1 to 18 of 18. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Alcohol and its dangers

Posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 13:07:19

Folks,

Is there any reliable literature out there on the effects of short- and long-term alcohol consumption on cognition. Will a week's worth of drinking cause damage, or does it take years and years of heavy drinking? What is the etiology of the damage? The alcohol itself, vitamin deficiency, something else? Finally, is this damage reversible, and is there a quantitative way to measure it?

I ask because I seem to have a horrible response to alcohol these days -- it zaps my memory and brings me down for a couple weeks into a cloudy, unorganized, unmotivated funk. And I think -- is this the alcohol, or is it a side-effect of the alcohol's interaction with my psychopharmacological medication? I have had, maybe, 24 nights out drinking in the past two years.

I guess I just want to see if my having a casual drink or two (or three) now and then if I'm committing intellectual suicide. Are truly successful, smart people all non-drinkers?

Any medicines to offset any possible damage?

Thanks,

amd

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD

Posted by Phillipa on March 24, 2005, at 15:47:03

In reply to Alcohol and its dangers, posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 13:07:19

I drank 5 beers every night, and took l0mg of paxil along with xanax for years until my first hospitalization. They put me on Chloral Hydrate for sleep and told me not to drink again. I haven't. I'm not taking the chloral hydrate anymore just valium total of l5mg a day with small dose of remeron and zoloft. I was thinking that I could probably drink again, but then I thought, I wouldn't be able to read in bed as I'd fall asleep. So I won't. To answer your question, I know many people who drink casually as you say you do and have suffered no ill effects. I have heard that it lowers the effectiveness of AD's. A drink now and then shouldn't hurt with your pdocs okay. The liver and brain do become diseased with prolonged, heavy drinking. To say what that is, is based on the individual person. Fondly, Phillipa

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers

Posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 16:36:51

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD, posted by Phillipa on March 24, 2005, at 15:47:03

Thanks -- I alternate between worrying about it and thinking, "oh, it's no big deal." I think I need to detox (quit drinking) for my own good, even if I drink only occasionally. The stress is obviously not good!

amd

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD

Posted by Phillipa on March 24, 2005, at 17:05:43

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers, posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 16:36:51

Makes sense to me! Fondly, Phillipa

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers

Posted by Wildman on March 25, 2005, at 8:46:21

In reply to Alcohol and its dangers, posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 13:07:19

I have recently cut _way_ back on alcohol and have found (much to my surprise) that I feel soooo much better without alcohol in my life.

I still have maybe 2 beers on friday and saturday (with dinner), but no more than that.

I am more patient with my family, I am not as irritiable, and I've lost a few pounds!

I snore less (my wife loves that part) and we are now much closer now than we have been in years.

I don't think I have done _any_ longterm damage to myself during the time that I drank lots of beer.

I also find that the less I drink, the less I want to drink (which is nice).

Wildman

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers

Posted by celticmom on March 25, 2005, at 10:24:01

In reply to Alcohol and its dangers, posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 13:07:19

My mother (a true irish woman) swears B complex vitamins keep her from having any long term problems with her wine consumption. The jury is still out.

That being said, I really don't think that casual alcoholic consumption is a bad thing. "They" say that a glass of red wine every night is good for you.

I do think if you are on any meds you need to be careful. My DH got into a lot of trouble when he started paxil because he thought he could drink like he used to - he couldn't. After a couple of beers, he became a complete pain and he couldn't control his drinking.

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD

Posted by Larry Hoover on March 25, 2005, at 10:35:02

In reply to Alcohol and its dangers, posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 13:07:19

> Folks,
>
> Is there any reliable literature out there on the effects of short- and long-term alcohol consumption on cognition. Will a week's worth of drinking cause damage, or does it take years and years of heavy drinking? What is the etiology of the damage? The alcohol itself, vitamin deficiency, something else? Finally, is this damage reversible, and is there a quantitative way to measure it?

Acute vs. chronic.

I lived for years with alcohol as a daily part of my life. I averaged (close to) 12 beers a day on days I went to work. 24 on days I was home. I went without sleep at the end of long workdays, to get my quota of beer before I went to bed.

I am now sober nearly eight years. I had a brief relapse, trying to deal with side effects of SSRI medication (insomnia), or I'd be sober about 15 years. 12 steps saved my posterior.

Chronic excessive alcohol consumption places extraordinay nutrient stress on the body, but it is also associated with poor diet. This leads to malnutrition, particularly in terms of zinc, and thiamine. This may lead to enchephalopathies like Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

Acute alcohol intoxication is very disturbing to the brain. There is evidence that every known neurotransmitter is affected by alcohol. It disturbs each and every one that we know of.

Individual differences, and also experience with drinking itself, lead to differences in post-intoxication effects. It's important to recognize the "individual differences" bit. What does alcohol do to YOU?

> I ask because I seem to have a horrible response to alcohol these days -- it zaps my memory and brings me down for a couple weeks into a cloudy, unorganized, unmotivated funk. And I think -- is this the alcohol, or is it a side-effect of the alcohol's interaction with my psychopharmacological medication? I have had, maybe, 24 nights out drinking in the past two years.

And other substances. Alcohol is a potent disinhibitor. It may provide a fertile ground for a cascade of behaviours which might otherwise not have been initiated.

> I guess I just want to see if my having a casual drink or two (or three) now and then if I'm committing intellectual suicide. Are truly successful, smart people all non-drinkers?

Individual differences. Think individual differences.

> Any medicines to offset any possible damage?
>
> Thanks,
>
> amd

Vitamins. Nutrition.

I got started in my search for nutritional/supplemental interventions due to my interest in the adverse effects of chronic alcohol consumption. Dark clouds have silver linings.

Lar

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers Larry Hoover

Posted by celticmom on March 25, 2005, at 10:54:58

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD, posted by Larry Hoover on March 25, 2005, at 10:35:02

Larry - congratulations on being sober 8 years! That's incredible! My DH just got his 2 year chip. Giving up drinking was the hardest thing he ever did, but it was the best thing too. The last two years have been wonderful!

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers Larry Hoover

Posted by partlycloudy on March 25, 2005, at 12:39:29

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD, posted by Larry Hoover on March 25, 2005, at 10:35:02

Doh! I posted on the alternatives board about nutritional support and supplements for helping in sustaining sobriety - and here was the expert all along!

Larry, d'you mind taking a look at my post there and giving me your expert opinion?

most gratefully yours,
pc

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers

Posted by banga on March 27, 2005, at 7:07:12

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers Larry Hoover, posted by partlycloudy on March 25, 2005, at 12:39:29

I abused alcohol in the past, and then used it chronically. Liks Larry said, individual differences on effects and damage....for women, you can do the damage in one year that a male does in 5. I became severely malnutritioned, vitamin B deficiencies....curiously, it seemed it was more B12 than thiamine. I too began (re-)researching supplements during recovery.
I and others on this board in the past also spoke of the potential nasty effects of using alcohol and SSRIs. while on Prozac it was a major case of disinhibition and blackouts......but that is after many drinks, not one or two for me.

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers partlycloudy

Posted by banga on March 27, 2005, at 7:09:21

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers Larry Hoover, posted by partlycloudy on March 25, 2005, at 12:39:29

> Doh! I posted on the alternatives board about nutritional support and supplements for helping in sustaining sobriety - and here was the expert all along!

Look into Joan Larsen's books and program, that works on reversing damage and maintaining sobriety..

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers banga

Posted by partlycloudy on March 27, 2005, at 10:28:33

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers partlycloudy, posted by banga on March 27, 2005, at 7:09:21

Thanks, I am amassing quite the library here!
I appreciate the info - and wonder why no doctors ever suggest this type of help.
pc

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD

Posted by Mr.Scott on March 28, 2005, at 2:41:25

In reply to Alcohol and its dangers, posted by AMD on March 24, 2005, at 13:07:19

Just My Opinion Here...

My suggestion is to preferably eliminate alcohol or at least keep the usage to 1-2 drinks an evening (if thats possible for you) and don't make it a regular affair.

It will definately wreak havoc on mental conditions as well as the often delicate mechanism that psych meds have in trying to stabilize the brain.

Finally it's an interfering variable if nothing more. If you can eliminate it you'll simplify the equation.

Scott

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers Larry Hoover

Posted by AMD on March 28, 2005, at 18:41:04

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD, posted by Larry Hoover on March 25, 2005, at 10:35:02

Lar,

The individualist nature of alcohol was my hunch as well. As evidenced by yet /another/ night out Saturday (and another night around a table with "friends" and a, uh, mirror), alcohol not only disinhibits everything about me -- thank goodness I haven't gotten in more trouble -- but it causes me to do things I feel terrible about for days. And then I go do it again!

Now I look forward to feeling horrible for a week, nagged by the same questions I've asked on this board many, many times (and which I will /not/ ask this time!), and hoping I'll be "ok."

Well, I might /feel/ OK, but I have a problem. In two weeks I'll probably think "oh, well, a drink isn't that bad." What the heck!?

Right now I'm just going to try to get through the next few days.

amd

 

Re: Alcohol and its dangers

Posted by AMD on March 28, 2005, at 18:43:04

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers AMD, posted by Mr.Scott on March 28, 2005, at 2:41:25

I don't think one or two drinks would work for me.

I'm realizing: perhaps the alcohol is triggering mania? Would that explain this type of behavior? One drink and off I go ...

amd

 

Larry -- long-term damage to heart from cocaine?

Posted by AMD on March 30, 2005, at 17:39:59

In reply to Re: Alcohol and its dangers, posted by AMD on March 28, 2005, at 18:43:04

Larry,

I have a question for you regarding the effects of cocaine on the heart. I realize there is a danger of stroke or other heart/brain damage from the acute effects of a cocaine binge. But assuming one abstains from the drug, is there any long-term damage to blood vessels, etc., and does this damage cure over time? I have a doctor appointment tomorrow -- would he be able to assess whether there is damage to the heart or, in particular, the brain from my recent use? Or, if my blood pressure and heart rate are normal, and I continue to exercise, will I more-of-less heal?

Finally, is three times of use even something to worry about with regard to this?

Thanks, from your neighborhood pest,

amd

 

Re: Larry -- long-term damage to heart from cocaine?

Posted by reefer on April 3, 2005, at 7:13:32

In reply to Larry -- long-term damage to heart from cocaine?, posted by AMD on March 30, 2005, at 17:39:59

There is no risk of braindamage or toxicity to the heart unless you have overdosed heavily all three times you have used. And even if you overdosed all three times i seriously doubt there would be any permanent damage. It takes long-term heavy use to cause toxicity to the heart. If used heavily the brain can also take a punch but unlike the heart it recovers fairly well. Especially if working out on a regular basis.

 

Re: Larry -- long-term damage to heart from cocaine? AMD

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 3, 2005, at 9:52:21

In reply to Larry -- long-term damage to heart from cocaine?, posted by AMD on March 30, 2005, at 17:39:59

> Larry,
>
> I have a question for you regarding the effects of cocaine on the heart. I realize there is a danger of stroke or other heart/brain damage from the acute effects of a cocaine binge. But assuming one abstains from the drug, is there any long-term damage to blood vessels, etc., and does this damage cure over time? I have a doctor appointment tomorrow -- would he be able to assess whether there is damage to the heart or, in particular, the brain from my recent use? Or, if my blood pressure and heart rate are normal, and I continue to exercise, will I more-of-less heal?
>
> Finally, is three times of use even something to worry about with regard to this?
>
> Thanks, from your neighborhood pest,
>
> amd

Sorry, I didn't notice this post before. Yes, it is possible to cause damage to the heart and/or blood vessels, but, and that's a big but, you'd be in a hypertensive crisis, and I'm pretty sure you'd know about that. There may be an increased risk of rhythm disturbance, but again, there would be all kinds of signs of that happening. In other words, simply getting high is no big deal. Your heart generally does more excited behaviour during good sex. We're built to handle that sort of thing.

Lar


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