Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 132539

Shown: posts 1 to 23 of 23. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Brain fog

Posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

Dear readers, I wanted to describe what I've always simply called "the feeling in my head" which may better be called "brain fog". I've read some of the previous posts and found some similar descriptions. It feels like a pressure behind my eyes and forehead. Like a headache without pain. It makes me feel confused, dumb and forgetful. If I use nicotine I will get extreme morning grogginess which no one else seems to experience. It has a component of derealization to it also. It is accentuated by bad stress to the point of being overwhelming. It affects my eyesight some, interfering with reading. This is hard to describe but almost feels like weak blind spots, but more generalized, or a bit like the effect of looking at an optical illusion.
I have had this at some level or another since high school, I believe. 8 years ago, in college it manifested/caused a bad bought of depression/anxiety/OCD. (I also had social anxieties and a severe case of paruresis (bashful bladder syndrome) that all came to a head at that time.) The "feeling in my head" was the central issue though, mainly because at age 14 I had sniffed inhalants (gasoline,glue,etc.) 20-30 times and had went unconscious once. Other than that I smoked marijuana some but not a lot when in high school. I've done no other drugs - these times were largely the result of peer pressure. Marijuana was almost always a horrifying experience for me and I do remember that that was the case even before any sniffing.
I have obsessed over the issue of brain damage and have often tried to remember whether I had this feeling before age 14 but am not sure. I do not know whether I am brain damaged or not and assume there is no way of telling. I have an above normal IQ based on some online tests I took, but that's not how I feel. Other symptoms are that I frequently mess up when handwriting, sometimes even on my own signature. I do not space out but do tend to go in circles on a lot of tasks.
I am successful at work as long as I feel I have control of my situation and have a good grasp of what I am doing. I have recently been offered an advance and a chance to attend graduate school but the stress has aggravated the brain fog and I've gotten scared. I have been living happily the last two years medication free by being carefull of stress, working in a field I feel comfortable with. I don't know if I should risk that that by trying to attend graduate school. I am afraid of a nervous breakdown enduced by the brain fog. I wish I didn't have this limitation though, because I really want to go.
Anafranil was a miracle for me in terms of relieving the obsessing over the brain fog. It also lifted a lot of social phobia, shyness, and sweating armpits. I didn't like living with the side effects though which included difficulty urinating, tenseness, and emotional dulling. Gingko helps quite a bit. I'm going to try Coenzyme Q-10.
I mainly posted this to document my experience so as to help others, but for my own benefit would very much like to see follow-up posts from anyone with advice or similar symptoms. In the past I've tried Luvox, Prozack, and Effexor. Nothing worked like Anafranil for me. Any one have advice on something similar that might have less sideffects? What about Paxil? Sincerely, Michael73

 

Re: Brain fog Michael73

Posted by johnj on December 19, 2002, at 21:55:58

In reply to Brain fog, posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

Michael,
I consider or should I say feel that I am a "sponge" brain expert. I get it when I have very high stress. I take nortryptline a TCA, lithium(I am not bipolar) and tranzene (a benzo). I am med sensitive and have had many foggy experiences. Remeron caused that feeling to the extreme. I too, do very well in school and have high anxiety. I finished grad school fine, but re-entry into the workforce has proved to bump back my mental progress. I had a pdoc who told me to go about and do what I would if I didn't have this illness. It was good and bad advice. I totally changed fields and a year abroad sort of broke me and I developed anxiety again. It is a hard decision, but one you should talk to a counselor and your pdoc about. If your family is aware of your illness talk to them too. But, I have found very few that actually have an idea what I feel, they do not understand the torment that comes from anxiety over the future, which logic tells me to ignore and just live!! I recently realized I have a mental, biological, and spiritual combination that conflict with each other often. Which one do I listen too? It is hard at times. I enjoyed your post. IF I had to do it over again I probably would do it the same. Maybe no matter what I did I would have a relapse at times. But, there is something to be said for stability and happiness, and THAT is what I am looking for right now. Please consult people that care about you, and make sure you are comfortable with the change. Can you go to grad school part time? Test the waters without diving in maybe? Good luck
johnj

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by McPac on December 19, 2002, at 23:29:24

In reply to Brain fog, posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

Michael,
I share many of your problems (depression/anxiety/ocd), I'd choose Zoloft over Paxil. Make sure, if you ever take it, that you take ENOUGH of it (high enough dose) AND give it plenty of time to become effective. You can also go back to the Anafranil since it worked well for you. On the natural side, take fish oils and perhaps try 5-htp as well.

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by Michael73 on December 20, 2002, at 3:27:16

In reply to Re: Brain fog Michael73, posted by johnj on December 19, 2002, at 21:55:58

johnj and McPac,
I really appreciate the posts. I do do well in school, but I'm very one tracked. I have a constant feeling that I'm forgetting something. That causes me to feel like I "have" to do things in order and completely before starting to the next. It's just like I'm missing something that people who I perceive as clear-minded have and that makes me feel inferior. Maybe something equivalent to a computer's RAM. I'm not very fluent. I have a combersome system of notebooks and ledgers that I feel I have to keep to keep my life together but I suspect most don't waste so much time as I do on the trivial things I do. I just don't have the capacity to easily filter important things from trivial. I study a lot because I always believe that will make life more manageable. I spent days reading, studying, and taking notes on my health, life, car, and car policies to feel comfortable. But I feel I have somewhat impaired recall. Though if I were tested on it I'd probably do fine. But it wouldn't "feel" like I did fine. All this is greatly accentuated by stress and seems associated with the "feeling in my head" i.e., "brain fog".
I can make academic acheivments. But I spend so much time going in circles I think I'd fall behind in graduate school especially working a job on the side. I was offered a job that allowed me to attend school part-time but I'm just afraid this condition will get in the way. It's just not so bad when I'm living without stress. I'm strongly considering turning the offer down and continuing in my "safe" job which I can do without medication and am happy doing and feel challenged by. I am scared of ever losing this job because I feel I can't do anything else even though I know on a rational level that isn't true. But that doesn't make it any less overwhelming. Does anyone experience these debilitating circles? Sincerely,Michael73 P.S. I did try Zoloft for a short while.

 

Re: Brain fog Michael73

Posted by Eddie Sylvano on December 20, 2002, at 10:41:09

In reply to Brain fog, posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

> Dear readers, I wanted to describe what I've always simply called "the feeling in my head" which may better be called "brain fog".
------------------

Have you tried any type of anticonvulsants? I've had a similar condition for several years, with depersonalization and fatigue. None of my senses seemed legitimate or cohesive, and I had to pay extra attention to everything in order to process it. Sort of like having to pay attention to the rules of riding a bike after you'd grown used to riding it without thinking. On bad days, I couldn't really do anything beyond sitting down and staring about blankly. Talking to people was always a surreal experience. The world around me seemed like a joke that I wasn't in on.
Nothing seemed to alleviate the problem until I tried tegretol, which addressed the problem rapidly. I still feel weird on occasion, but nowhere near as badly.

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by Creaky_Neurons on December 20, 2002, at 13:32:14

In reply to Brain fog, posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

ahhh, the dreaded brain fog - know it well and fear it like nothing else.

i've concluded it's a form of depression and the subjective experience is a combination of low neuronal activity in some areas and more in others. i suspect an inter-ictal (hemispheric/seizure-like) origin for this feeling. but nobody in the medical community seems interested in strapping a million-dollar instrument to my head and finding out.

my fogs often come with smell hallucinations, which also doesn't seem to impress my shrink, but it impresses the heck out of me.

i've had brain fogs with strong depressive feelings & without. they can last for months or be as short as 10 days.

exercise does seem to help reduce the frequency. i'm currently taking 2.5 grams/day of omegabrite fish oil and am off antidepressants for the first time in years. my brain seems to like this stuff.

i have heard people with lupus & cfs describe brain fogs (without depression) so it could be that this is an auto-immune disorder mixed in with garden variety depression.

it's all so complicated isn't it?

i feel for you man. do you ever have mania? it's the exact opposite of brain fog.

creaky.

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by jrbecker on December 20, 2002, at 14:20:11

In reply to Brain fog, posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

are you atypical or melancholic in depressive symptomolgy? Low cortisol and NE output are frequently correlated with "brain fog." As some have mentioned, so is CFS.


 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by michael73 on December 20, 2002, at 22:36:50

In reply to Re: Brain fog, posted by jrbecker on December 20, 2002, at 14:20:11

It is interesting that none of the SSRI's did much for me, but with Anafranil I don't even have to take the start out dose. Anafranil, in addition to serotonin, effects NE. I read somewhere that the right hemisphere deals mostly with novel situations and uses NE. The left deals with repetition and uses dopamine. Maybe I have an imbalance of NE that causes me confusion in new situations making me try to order my life by learning things until they are "repetitive". I often feel that I am straining to think through things while avoiding really thinking with the proper part of the brain - if that makes sense - as if one part of my brain is shut down and another ill-suited part is frantically and fruitlessly trying to compensate. Thanks for the posts. Michael73

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by bookgurl99 on December 21, 2002, at 8:21:32

In reply to Brain fog, posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

I had similar symptoms -- physical sensation in the head, kind of a squeezing or pressure feeling in the forehead, etc., optical weirdness (colors looking different or just feeling like I couldn't scan as well as normal) -- accompanied with feeling stupid, being very forgetful. I call them 'slow brain days.'

I talked to a doc about it and was dx'd with atypical migraines. I take verapamil 80 mg 3x/day to combat it. At the time of dx, I was VERY anxious about it -- it's scary to think you could be losing it. AND I had trouble believing it could be migraines, because of severity of the symptoms. But it turned out that it _was_ migraines; verapamil 3x/day worked like a charm to prevent them. I felt better the first day.

Plus, now that I know what it is, I feel much less anxious about my 'slow brain days'.

might wanna talk to your doc about this,

bookie

 

Meds for Brain fog? What works?

Posted by mattdds on December 21, 2002, at 13:32:39

In reply to Brain fog, posted by Michael73 on December 19, 2002, at 18:27:49

Hey "foggers",

What you are all describing is something that I have had for over a year now, although it appears to go away with the anxiety. I believe the term that psychiatrists use is depersonalization or derealization. I have read in many places that this is a common symptom of anxiety, especially panic disorder.

I got the "pressure" and weird sensations in the head, as well as the weird foggy brain.

This tends to go away, albeit very slowly, when the anxiety resides. At least this was my experience.

Anybody have any meds that seem to work for this?

Matt

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by michael73 on December 21, 2002, at 14:14:03

In reply to Re: Brain fog, posted by bookgurl99 on December 21, 2002, at 8:21:32

Thank-you so much for your post bookie. I was just getting ready to ask my grandmother to more closely describe a migraine. Migraines run in my family on one side and I did wonder if I got something like them without the pain. I had a CAT-scan done when I was 21, 8 years ago, because I thought it had to be SOMETHING, maybe like a brain tumor. I'm sure inhalants didn't help anything but I don't think they're the cause. The CAT-scan only showed an infected sinus. That's no surprise because to this day I blow my nose alwost habitually but have no sign of allergies. Sinus headaches run on both sides of my family. I however almost never get headaches, at least not with pain. If I rub my forehead it does seem to affect the feeling I percieve to be in my brain. I wonder if obsessive thoughts are just fooling me into thinking that sinus pressure is a feeling actually inside my brain. In an earlier post I talked about Anafranil helping, I didn't really mean that the Anafranil directly affected the brain fog, it was more that I just didn't notice it anymore and felt more normal. Anafranil helped with shyness and settled down panic. It may have eased the brain fog that way. My brain fog rears up under generalized performance anxiety especially in social situations, and bad types of stress. I do associate brain fog with depersonalization or derealization, losing it, and feeling dumb but these are all symptoms of anxiety and panic. Believing that the cause of those symptoms is the the brain fog may just cause more anxiety which makes more brain fog and so forth down a visious circle. This is not to say I don't feel brain fog without anxiety, I do at times, but I also know that for long periods in the last two years that I have been been relatively "in control of my situation" and medication free that brain fog hasn't been an issue. Michael73

 

Re: Meds for Brain fog? What works?

Posted by michael73 on December 21, 2002, at 14:52:31

In reply to Meds for Brain fog? What works?, posted by mattdds on December 21, 2002, at 13:32:39

Matt, I think you're right about this feeling being associated with panic, anxiety, derealization, and depersonalization. I experience derealization and depersonalization - especially in social situations. I feel like I'm floating and withdrawn from reality.
Here are some sites for ideas on meds/supplemants:
http://web.tampabay.rr.com/lymecfs/brainfog.htm
www.wholehealthclinic.com/catalog/brain_fog.html
www.amaluxherbal.com
www.drlwilson.com

I havn't tried any of the multi-component supplements yet. I have tried gingko, fish oils, and coenzyme Q-10. Gingko has the most effect but is somewhat brief, it does seem beneficial though. People report good and longer lasting results with coenzyme Q-10. I've only taken it a few days and don't know about it yet. Fish oils have an immediate effect but I've only been trying them a few days too. I'm trying magnesium to see if it can help with stress. Anafranil helped me but I think that may have been mostly because it helped my obsessive thoughts from OCD. Search Google for "brain fog" or something similar and see what you get. Good luck. Michael73

 

Re: Meds for Brain fog? What works? michael73

Posted by jrbecker on December 21, 2002, at 15:45:26

In reply to Re: Meds for Brain fog? What works?, posted by michael73 on December 21, 2002, at 14:52:31

please report back to us on the co-enzynme Q trial. Would like to know if it has any effectiveness.

 

Re: Meds for Brain fog? What works?

Posted by Michael73 on December 21, 2002, at 16:40:33

In reply to Re: Meds for Brain fog? What works? michael73, posted by jrbecker on December 21, 2002, at 15:45:26

> please report back to us on the co-enzynme Q trial. Would like to know if it has any effectiveness.

I'll be away for a week. I'll try to report when I get back. I have trouble telling what does what sometimes though unless it has an immediate effect. Michael73

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by bookgurl99 on December 22, 2002, at 0:34:06

In reply to Re: Brain fog, posted by michael73 on December 21, 2002, at 14:14:03

> I wonder if obsessive thoughts are just fooling me into thinking that sinus pressure is a feeling actually inside my brain.

Actually, if it _is_ migraine, it _is_ in your brain -- or rather your vascular system in your brain. It sounds nutty, but I feel a sensation in a specific location in my forehead -- now I realize it's from vein activity. Sometimes I also get what I call 'dot headaches,' a little pain spot somewhere in my head, but not bad.

If you do any search on migraine, you can see that migraine causes numerous symptoms. I've even become very hyper from them.

OCD, though, does make us obsess about things. I really obsessed on this, got an MRI, the whole deal. Went from doctor to doctor. Most docs look at your psych history and write off symptoms. I finally saw a _neurologist_, not a gp, and he figured it out right away. :D

>I was just getting ready to ask my grandmother to more closely describe a migraine. Migraines run in my family on one side

As for the family connection, my twin (fraternal) gets them _with_ pain, but we can be treated the same way.

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by michael73 on December 22, 2002, at 18:36:14

In reply to Re: Brain fog, posted by bookgurl99 on December 22, 2002, at 0:34:06

Thank's Bookie, I don't really know much about migraines. Look at the SPECT or PET image at this site http://web.tampabay.rr.com/lymecfs/brainfog.htm
If you read the text you'll find out that the two images are actually of the same person before and after some sort of treatment. It was done at Harvard but the author didn't know what it was that was done. I don't know if what imaged there has anything to do with a migraine, but it's certainly very interesting. Michael73

 

Re: Brain fog michael73

Posted by bookgurl99 on December 22, 2002, at 23:32:19

In reply to Re: Brain fog, posted by michael73 on December 22, 2002, at 18:36:14

Mike,

actually, that's a SPECT scan of someone's brain after long-term chronic fatigue syndrome. (which it doesn't sound like you're dealing with.) the article is interesting in that it shows how illnesses other than 'brain illnesses' can affect the brain.

good luck, and try to relax a bit, y'know? :D

bookgurl99

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by pellmell on December 23, 2002, at 0:38:00

In reply to Re: Brain fog, posted by michael73 on December 22, 2002, at 18:36:14

I'm really glad to have come back to this board in time to find this discussion. Brain fog, including that odd pressure in my head like a half-filled balloon pressing against the inside of my skull (though I never thought of this as significant), has been a major component of my depression/dysthymia/whatever (my pdoc recently threw me onto the bipolar ii bandwagon). I especially sympathise with the feeling that you're using the wrong part of your brain, that if you could only get that other part running and find a way to feed it sense data and thoughts, that you could understand things so much more deeply and naturally... Sometimes I feel like a prep cook in a busy kitchen forced to use only a paring kinfe.

It's seriously affected my sense of humor, my social acumen, my enjoyment of my favorite and dialogue-heavy TV shows (Buffy, The West Wing, Law and Order), and any movies or magazine articles or novels with complex ideas and metaphors. I don't make connections like I used to, and connections are so necessary for intelligent thought... This is especially debilitating and horrifying (though I'm so demoralized at this point that the horror's faded and it all seems normal) to an English major, this not making connections, this being confused by metaphor, and is a part of why I've dropped out so many times... Like the original poster I break very easily under stress, especially academic stress. Actually, that's not true: I always find somewhere to hide when I see the first hairline cracks, shielding some small part of myself while the rest of my life crumbles neglected around me...

I've found some relief with Depakote ER, 1000mg h.s. I'm feeling less anxious, less prone to go from happy and talkative to utterly moody and silent during the course of an evening, etc., and this component of mental healthiness seems sustainable, unlike the (in retrospect) possibly hypomanic ups some ADs at some doses have caused in me. And I'm feeling more clearheaded, something I didn't expect. A few months ago I quit taking the 20mg/day of Celexa I was on for a while in a fit of quasi-irrationalness, and my head has actually cleared up a bit more since then (though my moods are generally darker).

I still feel everything I described above. A few months ago, before my doctor surprised the hell out of me with a script for Depakote, it was a whole lot worse. But it could still be a whole lot better.

Prozac is the one drug that seemed to unlock my brain, plug everything in and turn it on, hand me a chef's knife for mincing life's onions. It also ripped out my conscience and quite possibly turned me hypomanic. Though maybe at 20mg instead of 40 it wouldn't do that. I've been on so many antidepressants (nearly all of the SSRIs, Remeron, Wellbutrin, Effexor), though (though nearly always in monotherapy), and have always quit them after a time 'cause of a fear that I'd lost myself...

Good old coffee and cigarettes can clear the brain fog as well, but only for a *very* short time.

I also know that I ruminate too much, flog myself for every intellectual error or oversight. But I also think hopeful things like, maybe it'll get better next month, maybe you just need to write more, think more, maybe when you go back for one class next semester things'll be okay... I live alone and have few nearby friends am an assistant computer lab administrator for a guy who hates his job, so I only notice how dully unhappy I am (by contrast) when (say) an old lover comes to stay for a few days...

I dunno. Even if no one reads all this, it was good for me to say it.

So, on to my conclusion, in two parts:

Not so self-indulgent assertion:
Belive the hype. Mood stabilizers really aren't just for manic types anymore. I've gotten more relief from other drugs in my past, but none of them have done the sort of good that feels so *sustainable*, so, well...stable. With antidepressant monotherapy I've always by this point into treatment (4 months or so) like something's not right, or something's gotta give.

Self-indulgent and unanswerable question:
Is this as good as it gets(tm)? Should I wait for circumstances and nature (and maybe even personal effort! imagine) to lift me from this long depressive downswing like it has in the past, and hope that, unlike in the (Depakoteless) past, the Depakote will keep me from crashing again?

Argh.

-pm
(we mild depressives are the biggest windbags, aren't we?)

 

Re: Brain fog Pellmell

Posted by polarbear206 on December 23, 2002, at 7:42:31

In reply to Re: Brain fog, posted by pellmell on December 23, 2002, at 0:38:00

> I'm really glad to have come back to this board in time to find this discussion. Brain fog, including that odd pressure in my head like a half-filled balloon pressing against the inside of my skull (though I never thought of this as significant), has been a major component of my depression/dysthymia/whatever (my pdoc recently threw me onto the bipolar ii bandwagon). I especially sympathise with the feeling that you're using the wrong part of your brain, that if you could only get that other part running and find a way to feed it sense data and thoughts, that you could understand things so much more deeply and naturally... Sometimes I feel like a prep cook in a busy kitchen forced to use only a paring kinfe.
>
> It's seriously affected my sense of humor, my social acumen, my enjoyment of my favorite and dialogue-heavy TV shows (Buffy, The West Wing, Law and Order), and any movies or magazine articles or novels with complex ideas and metaphors. I don't make connections like I used to, and connections are so necessary for intelligent thought... This is especially debilitating and horrifying (though I'm so demoralized at this point that the horror's faded and it all seems normal) to an English major, this not making connections, this being confused by metaphor, and is a part of why I've dropped out so many times... Like the original poster I break very easily under stress, especially academic stress. Actually, that's not true: I always find somewhere to hide when I see the first hairline cracks, shielding some small part of myself while the rest of my life crumbles neglected around me...
>
> I've found some relief with Depakote ER, 1000mg h.s. I'm feeling less anxious, less prone to go from happy and talkative to utterly moody and silent during the course of an evening, etc., and this component of mental healthiness seems sustainable, unlike the (in retrospect) possibly hypomanic ups some ADs at some doses have caused in me. And I'm feeling more clearheaded, something I didn't expect. A few months ago I quit taking the 20mg/day of Celexa I was on for a while in a fit of quasi-irrationalness, and my head has actually cleared up a bit more since then (though my moods are generally darker).
>
> I still feel everything I described above. A few months ago, before my doctor surprised the hell out of me with a script for Depakote, it was a whole lot worse. But it could still be a whole lot better.
>
> Prozac is the one drug that seemed to unlock my brain, plug everything in and turn it on, hand me a chef's knife for mincing life's onions. It also ripped out my conscience and quite possibly turned me hypomanic. Though maybe at 20mg instead of 40 it wouldn't do that. I've been on so many antidepressants (nearly all of the SSRIs, Remeron, Wellbutrin, Effexor), though (though nearly always in monotherapy), and have always quit them after a time 'cause of a fear that I'd lost myself...
>
> Good old coffee and cigarettes can clear the brain fog as well, but only for a *very* short time.
>
> I also know that I ruminate too much, flog myself for every intellectual error or oversight. But I also think hopeful things like, maybe it'll get better next month, maybe you just need to write more, think more, maybe when you go back for one class next semester things'll be okay... I live alone and have few nearby friends am an assistant computer lab administrator for a guy who hates his job, so I only notice how dully unhappy I am (by contrast) when (say) an old lover comes to stay for a few days...
>
> I dunno. Even if no one reads all this, it was good for me to say it.
>
> So, on to my conclusion, in two parts:
>
> Not so self-indulgent assertion:
> Belive the hype. Mood stabilizers really aren't just for manic types anymore. I've gotten more relief from other drugs in my past, but none of them have done the sort of good that feels so *sustainable*, so, well...stable. With antidepressant monotherapy I've always by this point into treatment (4 months or so) like something's not right, or something's gotta give.
>
> Self-indulgent and unanswerable question:
> Is this as good as it gets(tm)? Should I wait for circumstances and nature (and maybe even personal effort! imagine) to lift me from this long depressive downswing like it has in the past, and hope that, unlike in the (Depakoteless) past, the Depakote will keep me from crashing again?
>
> Argh.
>
> -pm
> (we mild depressives are the biggest windbags, aren't we?)


Pellmell,

What an excellent desciption of "brain fog." It was just visiting me the past 3 weeks on and off. This time of the year with the lack of sunlight sends me into a tailspin. Finally got relief with increasing my mood stabilizer (Lamictal) up to 150mg. Shooting for 200mg. This is the first mood stabilizer that has given me inner peace and stability. I wish the same for you!! Hang in there!!

Laura

P.S.

Sat in front of the TV with a whole pot of coffee next to me. I know what you mean. Kicked the habit years ago. Was a chain smoker when the brain fog set in.

 

Re: Brain fog

Posted by noa on December 24, 2002, at 19:59:47

In reply to Re: Brain fog Pellmell, posted by polarbear206 on December 23, 2002, at 7:42:31

There are different experiences described here of "brain fog". Some of it sounds familiar to me, some not. But I thought I'd chime in with my standard advice of checking one's thyroid functioning. When my hypothyroid was at its worst, I had what I called brain fog, or what felt like cotton balls in my head. It was part of what muddied the quest for treatment for my anergic, paralizing "atypical" depression. Once the thyroid was treated, I started to respond to the antidepressants as I hadn't before.

 

Re: Hi! Nice to see your name again. :) noa

Posted by Dinah on December 24, 2002, at 20:19:40

In reply to Re: Brain fog , posted by noa on December 24, 2002, at 19:59:47

Perhaps I should check the meds board more often.

 

Re: Hi! Nice to see your name again. :) Dinah

Posted by noa on December 24, 2002, at 21:43:58

In reply to Re: Hi! Nice to see your name again. :) noa, posted by Dinah on December 24, 2002, at 20:19:40

Thanks, Dinah. Just arrived here tonight, first time in many months.

 

Re: Then what a nice Christmas present (nm) noa

Posted by Dinah on December 24, 2002, at 21:49:52

In reply to Re: Hi! Nice to see your name again. :) Dinah, posted by noa on December 24, 2002, at 21:43:58


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