Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 47535

Shown: posts 1 to 18 of 18. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Medicines For Life

Posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by noa on October 27, 2000, at 16:38:30

In reply to Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

Definitely.

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by angelrose on October 28, 2000, at 17:59:59

In reply to Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

I agree too. It's been hard for me to accept this especially when friends and some family members try to tell me otherwise. It is very aggravating and makes me slide back into the dark pit of despair.
I've tried to go without meds. and so far have not been able to so and stay sane.

Yes, I agree, this board is the best! It's great not to feel alone!

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by R.Anne on October 28, 2000, at 19:10:57

In reply to Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

Thank you Noa, and Angelrose for your supportive input. I appreciate this board a lot, too.


********

> I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?

 

Re: Medicines For Life R.Anne

Posted by noa on October 29, 2000, at 10:14:41

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 28, 2000, at 19:10:57

My acceptance of this is at its most stable right now, but the doubts can resurface sometimes--support really does help.

I am finding that accepting the reality of how chronic my depression has been has been a necessary component of recovery. I used to flee from each episode, hoping to put all depression behind me and start fresh, etc. But this had me trying so hard to be totally depression-free, which caused me to overreact to any low moods, and hate that part of myself, to kind of split myself into two--depressed me (rejected) and not-depressed me (longed for). Now, I am trying to be more realistic, and it actually helps keep things more even, so I don't have to spiral downward so quickly with each low mood, nor do I have to work so hard to be vigilant in keeping myself out of any emotional range of existence, just to avoid getting depressed.

I don't know if this makes sense. It does to me, but explaining it can be hard.

 

Re: Medicines For Life noa

Posted by allisonm on October 29, 2000, at 15:02:27

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life R.Anne, posted by noa on October 29, 2000, at 10:14:41

Noa,

I think I understand what you're saying, but can you explain "keeping myself out of any emotional range of existence, just to avoid getting depressed" ?

Do you mean avoiding situations that may evoke emotions?

Thanks.
Allison

 

Re: Medicines For Life R.Anne

Posted by ksvt on October 29, 2000, at 20:02:22

In reply to Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

>I used to really fight the whole concept of medicine for life. However, I think I agree with noa - once I came to some peace about the chronic aspects of depression I stopped obsessing so much about each little mood swing and about the notion of permanent meds and that aspect of things, now seems less worrisome. I think what did it for me was going through a period of trying alot of meds that didn't work, or worked for just a little while. Each time I'd take myself off one of these meds, I'd feel great for awhile but inevitably I'd crash. This in and of itself was depressing because it was a horrible reminder that I really did have an illness. I finally found a med, that while not perfect, has clearly had a therapeutic effect. Everytime I think about going off it, I draw to mind what it felt like to be at my depressed worst, and what an awful process it is to try out new drugs. That seems to calm down any anxiety I have about taking the ADs. Now what I worry about now is making drug adjustments. ksvt


I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by Cindy W on October 29, 2000, at 21:59:07

In reply to Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

> I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?

R.Anne, I can relate to what you wrote. I'd rather take meds and have a "normal" (sort of) life than stop them and be at the mercy of depression and OCD again. Since I came "out of the closet" about my OCD and depression, I've been trying to educate people I know about the need for the meds and how it is just like having some physical problem, for which meds are needed. People aren't treating me as weirdly as they used to, despite my cluttered car, office, and home. This board has really helped me; so have sessions with my pdoc.--Cindy W

 

Re: Medicines For Life allisonm

Posted by noa on October 30, 2000, at 8:05:18

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life noa, posted by allisonm on October 29, 2000, at 15:02:27

> Do you mean avoiding situations that may evoke emotions?
>
Yep, you put it more clearly, that is what I meant.

I still do this a lot, but not as much as I had been--keeping myself numb by playing computer games, for example, and avoiding situations that evoked feelings. Sleeping a lot, etc.

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by Pamela Kopeschka on October 30, 2000, at 9:21:04

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life allisonm, posted by noa on October 30, 2000, at 8:05:18

> > Do you mean avoiding situations that may evoke emotions?
> >
> Yep, you put it more clearly, that is what I meant.
>
> I still do this a lot, but not as much as I had been--keeping myself numb by playing computer games, for example, and avoiding situations that evoked feelings. Sleeping a lot, etc.

Hi, I am definitely avoiding situations that might cause problems.
I stay away from "people" and pretty much isolate myself, which I
know is considered a bad thing to do for depression, but I get so tired
of starting to feel good, and then getting upset about something and diving back
down.

I work at home selling stuff on eBay most of the time, which already isolates
me. I have had to work as hard as I can in order to pay my bills, which is a constant
problem. But this seems to be better for me than working in an office or somewhere else.
I do not like to be around people, especially in any social situation where I feel
stuck and can't leave if I am upset. I have felt much better since I decided to live like
this. I just wish I had more money. I applied for disability about two or three years ago, and
have been turned down and appealing, but I don't think I am going to get it. Hard to
prove depression, panic attacks, etc. can be disabling. Pam

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by S. Howard on November 1, 2000, at 19:30:12

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life, posted by Cindy W on October 29, 2000, at 21:59:07

> > I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?
>
> R.Anne, I can relate to what you wrote. I'd rather take meds and have a "normal" (sort of) life than stop them and be at the mercy of depression and OCD again. Since I came "out of the closet" about my OCD and depression, I've been trying to educate people I know about the need for the meds and how it is just like having some physical problem, for which meds are needed. People aren't treating me as weirdly as they used to, despite my cluttered car, office, and home. This board has really helped me; so have sessions with my pdoc.--Cindy W
******

"No one can make you feel inferior without your permission" - Eleanor Roosevelt (who was, incidentally, in love with another woman)

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by R.Anne on November 2, 2000, at 11:45:05

In reply to Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

> I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?
**********
Thank you for all the postings.

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by Lexie on November 2, 2000, at 12:55:44

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on November 2, 2000, at 11:45:05

I just got up the nerve yesterday to ask the question if I would be taking my medication for the rest of my life and the answer was yes. I guess I have to look at this as any other "life threating" illness. I have been suicidal multipal times. If I had any other life threating illness of course I would not hesitate to take medication. The medication I take, Topamax and Lamical are both taken every day by people with epilipsy so I know they are "safe" althought they have not been FDA approved for Bipolar. So I guess as long as I am fighting for my life I will keep fighting with my medication same as anyone else. Lexie

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by noa on November 2, 2000, at 14:31:18

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life, posted by Lexie on November 2, 2000, at 12:55:44

>I guess I have to look at this as any other "life threating" illness.

this is how I look at my illness, too.

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by caroline on November 2, 2000, at 15:12:34

In reply to Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on October 27, 2000, at 16:15:10

R.Anne,

I can definitely relate. I have lost so many years and given up so many opportunities because I was so sure long-term use of psychotropic medication was a bad idea. I've learned the hard way that if you have a chemical imbalance or a condition like Aspergers (both of which I have), trying to live without chemical help can be hell on earth. Now I am back on a combination of meds that works for me and I'm starting to make up for all that lost time. I'm lucky, I'm only 30. And I agree, this board is wonderful! I probably never would have found the combination of meds that works for me without the help and support I recieved here.

I hope things are going well for you. My thoughts and best wishes are with you and everyone else on this board,

Caroline

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by R.Anne on November 2, 2000, at 22:09:53

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on November 2, 2000, at 11:45:05

Thank you for your replies-they are helping me! I'm struggling at times with the thought of always taking medicines but you are right-this is a life threatening problem-and I'm going to try to remember that (my mind isn't what it used to be!)r.anne
*******
> > I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?
> **********
> Thank you for all the postings.

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by Shell on November 2, 2000, at 22:37:19

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life, posted by R.Anne on November 2, 2000, at 22:09:53

> > > I was told I would probably have to take medicines for the rest of my life for depression for one thing. I also have OCD and PTSD that I take medicines for, too. I can look at it and accept it as necessary for a better quality of life or a life at all. I accept that my brain chemistry went awry and the medicines help bring it closer to "normal." I think of myself as a person who needs medicine just like someone with a heart condition needs medicine. There are people out there, though, who don't understand it though, unfortunately. A lot of people need more education on mental illness to help them understand better. Sometimes I feel very alone and find this board helpful. I have had long term problems and have had therapies and use what I've learned, continue to learn more and feel I really need the medicines and maybe forever. Can anyone relate?

I may have a slightly different perspective on taking medicine for life. My mother and her sister struggled with depression for years before finding medication. That was more than 20 years ago and neither one of them would even consider stopping it and going back to what life was like before. Although I was just a kid, I can well remember how bad it was for them. So when I was diagosed with depression myself (and I can't believe I didn't realize it myself first, having lived with it - we all have seem to have identical symptoms), I just assumed I would be on medicine for life; it never occurred to me it would be otherwise. I have quite a few close relatives with depression and/or OCD (or both!) and can not think of one who doesn't plan to continue his/her medication indefinitely.

 

Re: Medicines For Life

Posted by noa on November 3, 2000, at 8:58:31

In reply to Re: Medicines For Life, posted by Shell on November 2, 2000, at 22:37:19

Sometimes I do wonder what my life might have been like had I had access to good meds from early on--in adolescence, or early twenties.


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