Psycho-Babble Psychology Thread 941860

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Re: please rephrase that

Posted by rnny on April 3, 2010, at 20:56:10

In reply to Re: please rephrase that rnny, posted by Dr. Bob on April 3, 2010, at 12:22:46

In the movie "The Silence of the Lambs", Dr. Hanibal Lecter (an imprisoned serial killer psychiatrist) was analyzing Jodie Foster who played an FBI agent assigned to interogate Lecter in order to get information out of him to help solve a pending crime. Lecter was very saavy with interpreting people and had a good sence for what they were all about, what they stood for. With Jodie Foster or as her character was called, Clarice Sterling, Lecter was not about to give up information freely and he really made Sterling work for it by playing head games with her and saying things to her that would throw her off kilter. In one scene Lecter is doing his thing, being condescending to Sterling and she talks back to him and says essentially, "you have very good insight about others, now let's hear you talk about yourself". That is what I was saying. Willful suggested and or said a few things about me in his/her post that are nothing more than his/her perception. I thought Willful was being presumptuous since they don't know me. Hence I decided to see if Willful would turn that powerful sence of diagnosing/figuring people out, if Willful would turn that on him/herself and instead of trying to figure me out, would dispense with some psychobabble about Willful instead. In short, "You seem to suggest alot about me Willful and you have never even met me. Let's see if you are that confident with talking about yourself and your issues".

 

Re: please rephrase that again rnny

Posted by Dr. Bob on April 4, 2010, at 19:40:19

In reply to Re: please rephrase that, posted by rnny on April 3, 2010, at 20:56:10

> "You seem to suggest alot about me Willful and you have never even met me. Let's see if you are that confident with talking about yourself and your issues".

Thanks, that's better, but I might feel challenged if someone posted that to me. Could you revise that again? Maybe just use an I-statement to describe your response to Willful's post? Thanks,

Bob

 

Re: please rephrase that again

Posted by rnny on April 4, 2010, at 21:42:42

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again rnny, posted by Dr. Bob on April 4, 2010, at 19:40:19

Willful, I was wondering if you think I come across as having alot of problems and I was wondering if you feel I am inferior to you. I want you to like me and am afraid maybe you don't.


> > "You seem to suggest alot about me Willful and you have never even met me. Let's see if you are that confident with talking about yourself and your issues".
>
> Thanks, that's better, but I might feel challenged if someone posted that to me. Could you revise that again? Maybe just use an I-statement to describe your response to Willful's post? Thanks,
>
> Bob

 

Re: please rephrase that again

Posted by Sigismund on April 4, 2010, at 22:34:57

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again, posted by rnny on April 4, 2010, at 21:42:42

Superior, inferior, normal, abnormal.

Humans! Goodness.

 

Re: please rephrase that again Sigismund

Posted by obsidian on April 4, 2010, at 23:51:25

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again, posted by Sigismund on April 4, 2010, at 22:34:57

> Superior, inferior, normal, abnormal.
>
> Humans! Goodness.

I would like to see the list of people starting from the best to the worst and also one indicating the most normal to the most abnormal.
Will it be one of those bell curves?
how skewed will I be?
everyone is better than me you know, it's quite tiring to live in the world when absolutely everyone is better than me. I am the most superior at being inferior. ;-)

 

Re: please rephrase that again (Willful)

Posted by rnny on April 5, 2010, at 1:07:17

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again rnny, posted by Dr. Bob on April 4, 2010, at 19:40:19

Willful,

My T told me to stay away from people with psychological problems to protect me from trying to get intimate with people who aren't whole enough to sustain the ups and downs of a friendship. But even before she said that, I would not have sought out people with psychological problems as people to form intimate friendships with. The reason I wouldn't have is because I have tried with several people who have serious mental illness and have found a common trait in all of them. An inability to behave in a way that doesn't drive others, including me, away. I have tried to befriend them by putting aside negative stigmas but have found them unable to attach in a productive way despite my giving them the benefit of the doubt. I can't say for sure that all people with psychological problems would be the same way, I can only go by those who have been or are in my sphere of life. When I refer to psychological problems I mean behaviors that don't make for a smooth connection. Such behaviors can take on a more subtle tone and as you spend time with the person, the behaviors become "obvious". Those behaviors would be getting to know someone and as you 'get' to know them, find them very narcistic. N's are destructive personalities and I would not seek out friendship with someone who has N traits. So yes, my T did say to stay away from people who aren't healthy mentally but even before she said that, I had my own standards for making friends. When you say you aren't close to anyone you don't really like, that is similar to what I am saying. If people with mental illness issues or subtle mental health issues were people I liked, I would want to be their friend. But as stated, my experience has been that such people are not capable of intimate friendship. And that is what I need right now. Like you, many people encounter others they don't initially connect with but can find a common bond with the person after the fact and even want to hang out with the person in time. To also clarify, I don't think the soul of people with mental issues are dripping with poison but I think there are some mental health issues that manifest themselves in ways that can be very destructive and hence "poison" those around them. I don't deem people with mental issues as unworthy of my friendship. I just have found the people with clearly defined mental illness have been incapable of making friends. I think you said it very clearly when you say that issues manifest themselves in ways that can be visible and disturbing but often can be under the surface. As to whether I agree with you that such underlying symptoms contribute to a relationship, it would depend on the person and what the symptom was. I had a negative view of myself before I sought treatment and still have a negative view of myself. I was raised by a woman who was a severely battered wife (my mother) and a father who tried to murder her several times and then abandoned us. She tried to kill herself and I found her when I was 12 years old. She was never able to carry out her role as a mother because she had a tremendous amount of inner turmoil that she took out on her children in the form of physical and verbal abuse. The impression I have of people with mental issues comes from being me. My siblings in their early 20's were very successful. On the other hand, I had a nervous breakdown and needed to be hospitalized. I have never forgiven myself for that and in many ways, my family hasn't forgotten it. So I include myself with the mentally ill people I distain. I have an advanced graduate professional degree that requires an approximate 3 day exam to be licensed. When I failed the exam 2 times I became severely depressed and couldn't function. I had been offered a good job in NYC and everything seemed to fall apart on the inside for me and I did not see it coming. This was after I accepted the position. Prior to that I only had the one other bout with depression and that was where I came to see myself as a mental case because I spent time in a mental institution. I was in one of the huge ones on Long Island that was closed down and there is a website now about "insane asylums" which has pictures of the day rooms, the hallways and other parts of the place. It hurts me to know I was a patient in that place when the site is clearly to attract the curious. So I am sorry I speak or have spoken harshly of the mentally ill. I have been around them all of my life because my own demons have reminded me that I am one of them. And I have been with me all of this time. PS- When I was in the hospital one of the patients was a psychiatrist and another was a psychiatric social worker. I used to go to them for help and they would try to help me but would also be telling me that they were there because they had problems too and that they might not be the best people to be asking questions of. rnny


 

(((rnny))) (nm) rnny

Posted by floatingbridge on April 5, 2010, at 1:16:28

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again (Willful), posted by rnny on April 5, 2010, at 1:07:17

 

Re: please rephrase that again (Willful) rnny

Posted by vwoolf on April 5, 2010, at 1:36:22

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again (Willful), posted by rnny on April 5, 2010, at 1:07:17

I feel very moved by your post - I'm sorry it's been so painful. I have had similar experiences to yours and know how these things cling to your sense of who you are. For what it's worth, my T also told me to avoid coming to websites 'like this'. That was seven years ago. I chose to ignore her. I know now that this website has been an important part of my therapy, and that if I had listened to her, I might not have managed to do the work I have. Take care, Rnny.

 

Re: please rephrase that again obsidian

Posted by Sigismund on April 5, 2010, at 1:41:12

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again Sigismund, posted by obsidian on April 4, 2010, at 23:51:25

> I would like to see the list of people starting from the best to the worst and also one indicating the most normal to the most abnormal.
Will it be one of those bell curves?
how skewed will I be?
everyone is better than me you know, it's >quite tiring to live in the world when absolutely everyone is better than me. I am the most superior at being inferior. ;-)

Well (as you know) there is a ladder leading up to heaven with God at the top and the Archbishop of Canterbury highest here on earth and it's downhill after that :)

 

Re: please rephrase that again rnny

Posted by Sigismund on April 5, 2010, at 1:52:32

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again (Willful), posted by rnny on April 5, 2010, at 1:07:17

That was very moving, Rnny. Geez.

I like to think that within the limits of online interaction that it's possible to make real connections and that I've been able to do it sometimes.

I don't know....I live around people who accept that they are not normal....maybe that's just our thing, the whole community seems to accept that?
But narcissists? Well, it's the most interesting disorder in the DSM, the one I always turn to when I get my hands on it, and maybe reflective of our times?

 

Acceptance rnny

Posted by Dinah on April 5, 2010, at 6:59:27

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again (Willful), posted by rnny on April 5, 2010, at 1:07:17

> So I include myself with the mentally ill people I distain.

That can't be a very comfortable way to feel. Do you think that trying to cultivate a generosity of spirit and acceptance of others might help you feel generously and accept yourself? Or that trying to cultivate a generosity of spirit and acceptance of yourself might help you feel generously and accept others?

I hesitate to say how picky I am about choosing friends because friendship isn't simply an either-or. There are many degrees of friendship, and I don't think I have a dividing line between friend and acquaintance. I try to enjoy people for whatever aspect of their character I find interesting or inspiring or amusing or whatever. And to not expect of them anything more than they are able to give. I try to trust with common sense. And even if I perhaps need to guard myself with people who aren't able to be what I might wish they could be to me, that doesn't mean I can't appreciate what they are. It doesn't mean that I would exclude them as friends.

Nor do I really have a cutoff between "mentally ill" and "not mentally ill". "Normal" people come with their own issues. If I find myself having to choose between the "normal" and the neurotic, I think I'd probably choose to be with the neurotic. The anxious, those who know what it means to be depressed.

I don't like what your therapist said at least in part because it wasn't a very supportive thing to say to someone who struggles themselves. Sure, you may be appealing and smart and trying hard. But so are many of the others your therapist wrote off as not worthy of being friends. That doesn't speak of the sort of generosity of spirit and acceptance I'd like to see in a therapist. And despite the outward compliment in it, there's a backhand insult in it as well. Does she tell others to avoid people with issues as well? People who might include you? If another therapist said the same thing to a client, wouldn't they be warning them off against you?

It would be inviting pain to expect more from anyone than they are able to give or to trust people more than they can be trusted. It would be a great loss to fail to value what those people *can* offer.

People are people. Whether they struggle with mental illness or not. I think what a lot of people in this thread and the other are saying is that those people can be enjoyed for the inherently valuable people they are. Everyone is, at their core, worthy of respect and caring. People with more serious mental illness. People who fall in the neurotic range of mental health issues. "Normal" people.

You.

 

Re: please rephrase that again Sigismund

Posted by obsidian on April 5, 2010, at 13:28:46

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again obsidian, posted by Sigismund on April 5, 2010, at 1:41:12

> > I would like to see the list of people starting from the best to the worst and also one indicating the most normal to the most abnormal.
> Will it be one of those bell curves?
> how skewed will I be?
> everyone is better than me you know, it's >quite tiring to live in the world when absolutely everyone is better than me. I am the most superior at being inferior. ;-)
>
>
>
> Well (as you know) there is a ladder leading up to heaven with God at the top and the Archbishop of Canterbury highest here on earth and it's downhill after that :)

lol, very funny :-)

 

Re: please rephrase that rnny

Posted by Dr. Bob on April 6, 2010, at 1:01:52

In reply to Re: please rephrase that again (Willful), posted by rnny on April 5, 2010, at 1:07:17

> Willful, I was wondering if you think I come across as having alot of problems and I was wondering if you feel I am inferior to you. I want you to like me and am afraid maybe you don't.

Excellent, thank you. And thank you for saying more about yourself and your issues later.

> N's are destructive personalities and I would not seek out friendship with someone who has N traits.

But now we're starting over. Keeping in mind that the idea here is not to post anything that could lead others (including people with narcissistic traits) to feel accused or put down, could you please rephrase the above? Thanks,

Bob

 

Re: please rephrase that

Posted by rnny on April 6, 2010, at 4:55:28

In reply to Re: please rephrase that rnny, posted by Dr. Bob on April 6, 2010, at 1:01:52

I have some relatives with narcisitic personality disorder and have been very hurt by them. But it would be very possible for me to meet someone with N, not even know it and find the person lovely. It doesn't mean because they have N that they would take it out on me.

 

Re: please rephrase that

Posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 9:37:13

In reply to Re: please rephrase that, posted by rnny on April 6, 2010, at 4:55:28

Hi Rnny,

I think you are making some very smart choices here. My experience online and in my real life is that I tend to be someone who is very open( I will talk to almost anyone) and it tends to attract people who are very needy. I tend to want to get too involved to help them, so I pure out tons of support. Which I am fine with to a point, as helping people feels good.

But in a real close friendship, you will sometimes need that support yourself and if that other person is only concerned with their needs, it leads to disappointment because you realize the relationship is only one sided. Friendship is a give and take thing and if you are the only one giving, it isn't really a friendship.

I have tons of people I talk to during class, between class, even socially at parties. But true friends where you can open up and be close to, well that is different. I have only a few select people that I am true friends with. They have offered me support when I needed it and I have given support when they needed it.

Now everyone has problems, but certain mental problems would prevent a real healthy friendships from developing. The healthier I get, the less I want to deal with destructive selfish behaviors from others in a beginning friendship. I don't exclude being social with people, but friendships are reserved to those who are capable of the give and take of one.

When you experience true friendship, you also realize how one sided T relationships are. I love my T, but I don't want to be her friend.

If a T relationship is the only one where one can feel they can show themselves or the only close relationship one feels they have, then they have so much more work to do. A T relationship is more about taking than giving. While it feels good to have someone there for you, it feels even better when it is a true friend where one has developed where you also give. A T is suppose to model a good healthy relationship for clients so they to learn how to be a friend. Hopefully the client learns this and applies this to their real life so they can have the most meaningful relationships.

It bothers me to see those in long term therapy who really don't have serious issues to warrant long time therapy, because it seems to me they are using the therapy relationship as a substitute relationship because they are unable to have a real relationship in the real world. I know of a few people who don't have any friends but have been in therapy for years. Therapy relationships feel good, so I don't fault the client, but I see problems with a T who can't send their clients on their way to have real relationship in the real world. Therapy relationships are not a good substitute for a real close friendship.

 

Re: thanks (nm) rnny

Posted by Dr. Bob on April 6, 2010, at 15:07:39

In reply to Re: please rephrase that, posted by rnny on April 6, 2010, at 4:55:28

 

Re: please rephrase that BabyToes

Posted by Dr. Bob on April 6, 2010, at 15:22:49

In reply to Re: please rephrase that, posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 9:37:13

> It bothers me to see those in long term therapy who really don't have serious issues to warrant long time therapy, because it seems to me they are using the therapy relationship as a substitute relationship because they are unable to have a real relationship in the real world. I know of a few people who don't have any friends but have been in therapy for years.

Keeping in mind that the idea here is not to post anything that could lead others (including those with therapists, but without friends) to feel accused or put down, could you please rephrase that? Thanks,

Bob

 

long term therapy

Posted by obsidian on April 6, 2010, at 15:53:50

In reply to Re: please rephrase that BabyToes, posted by Dr. Bob on April 6, 2010, at 15:22:49

> > It bothers me to see those in long term therapy who really don't have serious issues to warrant long time therapy, because it seems to me they are using the therapy relationship as a substitute relationship because they are unable to have a real relationship in the real world. I know of a few people who don't have any friends but have been in therapy for years.

you don't mean anyone here right?
I'm going with the idea that you're not referring to anyone here.

I think it's kind of hard to say what warrants long term therapy.
I'd be curious to hear what other people think about the issue of long term therapy.
for myself I'd say, I'm just not ready to stop. I think I still need some help. I've got a lot of good relationships, many because of therapy.

 

Re: long term therapy

Posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 17:11:43

In reply to long term therapy, posted by obsidian on April 6, 2010, at 15:53:50

> > > It bothers me to see those in long term therapy who really don't have serious issues to warrant long time therapy, because it seems to me they are using the therapy relationship as a substitute relationship because they are unable to have a real relationship in the real world. I know of a few people who don't have any friends but have been in therapy for years.
>
> you don't mean anyone here right?
> I'm going with the idea that you're not referring to anyone here.
>
> I think it's kind of hard to say what warrants long term therapy.
> I'd be curious to hear what other people think about the issue of long term therapy.
> for myself I'd say, I'm just not ready to stop. I think I still need some help. I've got a lot of good relationships, many because of therapy.

I am actually talking about myself here since I have been in therapy a long time but with different therapists. I just don't believe in being with one therapist for years because I think the goal of therapy should be to be able to handle life with the support of family and friends more than with just a therapist. A therapist should be encouraging better real world relationships with the client.

Maybe go back for a refresher now and then if needed but to go on and on for years, well I just don't see the value of that for myself. Why not take several months off or a year to see how one would do? Therapy is so expensive and it is very hard work. It is hard to maintain both of those for years. There come a point of diminishing returns.

The richer my life becomes the less I feel I need therapy for support. Isn't that the goal of therapy, to be able to be healthy enough to handle life's up and downs on your own or with the help of friends?

I just feel that it is unethical for T's to charge as much as they do, for just social chit chat for months and months. My first T did that and I barely worked on anything for 2 1/2 years and it just made me too independent on him for social needs.
My current T does not do that, we work hard, but she is always having me working on something, there are goals of being able to be independent. It just seems to me that if a client is working hard in therapy, they won't want to be in therapy for years. It is too exhausting. But by my T not trying to be my friend, it has made me look for that in my real life. I have found that T relationships are really not as fulfilling as real relationships and a good T would not let their clients totally depend on them for their social or supportive needs.

I have a friend who is in T and therapy is her highlight of her life. That one hour all week is her life and she has been with him for over 5 years. Life is just too short. I feel that a T should want their client to move on without them, it is a sign of good mental health to be able to live life without the needs of a professional every week. A good T should be teaching a client to handle life and to reach out to friends or family for help for minor things. Life will always have ups and downs, being in therapy won't let anyone escape that, no matter how mentally healthy someone is. But learning to deal with life is a skill that most T's should be teaching.

Now I know there are some cases where some do require a T every week to keep the out of the hospital, but I am not talking about those severe cases.

Another thing I have noticed too is that there is benefit in seeing different T's because one T can't help with everything or will see everything a client needs help on.

I just feel when therapy become too comfortable, or fun, that a client should move on either with a new T or on their own. Or at least try.

Therapy for me is hard work and exhausting mostly (there are some easier sessions especially with trauma work) I don't want to be in therapy forever, and have found that a good friend can help with most of my issues that come up in a week. Plus it is so much more satisfying. But the key is finding someone who is able to be a friend and maintain a friendship.

>

 

Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb

Posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 17:18:59

In reply to Re: please rephrase that BabyToes, posted by Dr. Bob on April 6, 2010, at 15:22:49

Dr. Bob,
I really don't know how to rephrase that to your standards. My comments were not meant to put anyone down or make anyone feel bad, it was just an observation I have made in my real life, including myself. If you can give me tips on how to rephrase this, please offer suggestions. PTSD causes me not to be able to think as clearly cognitively as if I wasn't having PTSD symptoms. It has been years and I still find your rules confusing. So if you have any suggestions, since you are requesting this and I don't know how, can you at least try to help out?

> > It bothers me to see those in long term therapy who really don't have serious issues to warrant long time therapy, because it seems to me they are using the therapy relationship as a substitute relationship because they are unable to have a real relationship in the real world. I know of a few people who don't have any friends but have been in therapy for years.
>
> Keeping in mind that the idea here is not to post anything that could lead others (including those with therapists, but without friends) to feel accused or put down, could you please rephrase that? Thanks,
>
> Bob

 

Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb

Posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 17:38:48

In reply to Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb, posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 17:18:59

It is weird because I am feeling rather put down because I feel everything I say is wrong and gets warnings. I can't seem to do anything right here. I honestly don't know what I am keep doing wrong so I guess it would be better to not post then.

I wasn't trying to put anyone down or feel bad, if you were, I am sorry for that.

I just don't fit in here because I don't know how to speak the Dr. Bob language. So I guess it is best I don't post anymore.

 

Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb BabyToes

Posted by obsidian on April 6, 2010, at 19:12:40

In reply to Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb, posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 17:38:48

> It is weird because I am feeling rather put down because I feel everything I say is wrong and gets warnings. I can't seem to do anything right here. I honestly don't know what I am keep doing wrong so I guess it would be better to not post then.
>
> I wasn't trying to put anyone down or feel bad, if you were, I am sorry for that.

I thought you did it very nicely when you spoke about your own experiences, and what it is about you and what you want that makes you feel long term therapy may not be a good idea.

As far as other people go, we can't always know, and what can we do? Their lives are their own.
...not that I don't have my opinion, I've got a lot of them.

I didn't think your intention was to hurt or put anyone down, which is why I assumed the best. Of course, and understandably, with so many of us in long term therapy?? I think?
there might be people here with sensitivities about that issue

what you said is not wrong, just better understood from your own experiences
:-)
thanks for your reply
>
> I just don't fit in here because I don't know how to speak the Dr. Bob language. So I guess it is best I don't post anymore.

 

Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb

Posted by emmanuel98 on April 6, 2010, at 20:49:44

In reply to Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb, posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 17:38:48

I thought your post was great. I know a lot of people who go to therapy to chat or just check in because they feel dependent on their therapist and can't seem to transfer that feeling of love and dependency and vulnerability to others. Doing that should be a really important goal of therapy. Sometimes therapists will encourage dependent patients to find a group or join a 12-step group and expand their social networks.

 

Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb

Posted by emmanuel98 on April 6, 2010, at 20:57:51

In reply to Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb, posted by emmanuel98 on April 6, 2010, at 20:49:44

When I quit regular therapy last winter, my T said it was good that I didn't want to hang around and have him be a "fantasy friend" for me.

 

Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb obsidian

Posted by BabyToes on April 6, 2010, at 22:03:30

In reply to Re: please rephrase that) Dr. BOb BabyToes, posted by obsidian on April 6, 2010, at 19:12:40

Thank you for not thinking the worst of me and thinking I was trying to hurt someone or put them down and actually trying to understand what I was saying within the context and not assume I was being mean.


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