Psycho-Babble Psychology Thread 910141

Shown: posts 1 to 12 of 12. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

the term 'pdoc'

Posted by friesandcoke on August 3, 2009, at 22:27:49

OK,here is something I have wanted to say to someone, anyone on any board where this is used. "Pdoc". I have seen it on boards besides this one. And I want to say "why don't you just say your psychiatrist? Or ask, "when you say pdoc, are you saying your "psychiatric doctor"? Wouldn't it be easier to just say "my doctor"? because maybe it is a family doctor who prescribes the meds. pdoc bugs me. you want to know why? it sounds so friendly and casual, kind of chummy, non-assuming and as if the "pdoc" is a minor player on a team that is taking care of someone. My "pdoc". I don't like the phrase "shrink" but I love it compared to "pdoc". It reminds me of someone trying to be hip maybe, or part of the in crowd. I have a "pdoc". You know, like it used to be hip to say you were in therapy. Well that is what it reminds me of. Like it is someone trying to act casual about a matter we all know is no joke. Seeing a psychiatrist. Not the seeing of the psychiatrist but the issues that bring us there. So I feel people aren't being honest and sincere about the fact that they have serious issues since after all, they only see a "pdoc". Any time I have seen a psychiatrist, believe me it was not about anything casual or any kind of joke. The world if they read this now knows I am baffled by the phrase "pdoc". And it scares me to think I will get criticized becuase of it. But I am getting used to people not liking me when I won't clone myself after them so I am guessing I will survive. However, only time will tell! :) I mean I haven't even been criticized yet! :)

 

Re: the term 'pdoc' friesandcoke

Posted by Deneb on August 3, 2009, at 22:44:22

In reply to the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 3, 2009, at 22:27:49

The term "pdoc" is not different in any way to "psychiatrist" in my mind. It is just a shortened form of psychiatrist.

I don't associate pdoc with anything I don't already associate with the word psychiatrist. Maybe you are the only one who feels this way. I think most people just use it because it is easier than typing psychiatrist. It is also easier to spell. LOL

 

Re: the term 'pdoc' friesandcoke

Posted by fleeting flutterby on August 3, 2009, at 22:56:39

In reply to the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 3, 2009, at 22:27:49

> OK,here is something I have wanted to say to someone, anyone on any board where this is used. "Pdoc". I have seen it on boards besides this one. And I want to say "why don't you just say your psychiatrist?<<

--flutterby: I think there are many reasons.... some just don't want to type that long word out, some might not know how to spell it(it's a tricky word) and some are just used to "pdoc" instead of psychiatrist.

>> pdoc bugs me. you want to know why? it sounds so friendly and casual, kind of chummy, non-assuming and as if the "pdoc" is a minor player on a team that is taking care of someone.<<

---flutterby: If you don't mind me saying-- you seem to be VERY focused on "professionalism". I like to think there are just as many good layed-back(sp?) doctors that wear tennis shoes and polo shirts as there are stiff shirt and tie doctors. Being layed-back doesn't necessarily mean one is NOT taking it seriously. Struggling with MI all ones life, maybe that's how some get through, from day to day.

> My "pdoc". I don't like the phrase "shrink" but I love it compared to "pdoc". It reminds me of someone trying to be hip maybe, or part of the in crowd. I have a "pdoc". You know, like it used to be hip to say you were in therapy. Well that is what it reminds me of.<<

---flutterby: well that is how you see. I don't see it that way. but that's OK...that's what makes the world awesome-- we can be different.

>>Like it is someone trying to act casual about a matter we all know is no joke. Seeing a psychiatrist. Not the seeing of the psychiatrist but the issues that bring us there. So I feel people aren't being honest and sincere about the fact that they have serious issues since after all, they only see a "pdoc". Any time I have seen a psychiatrist, believe me it was not about anything casual or any kind of joke.<<

---flutterby: Yea, it's NOT a joke at all. (do you fear people don't take you seriously?) I don't see those that use "pdoc" as not taking it seriously or making a joke of it...... interesting.... I've never thought of that word that way.... and I still don't.

>>The world if they read this now knows I am baffled by the phrase "pdoc". And it scares me to think I will get criticized becuase of it. But I am getting used to people not liking me when I won't clone myself after them so I am guessing I will survive. However, only time will tell! :) I mean I haven't even been criticized yet! :)<<

---flutterby: Seems to me you're just trying to understand, and that is a good thing-- IMO. :o)

best to you
flutterby-mandy

 

Re: the term 'pdoc' friesandcoke

Posted by obsidian on August 3, 2009, at 23:25:12

In reply to the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 3, 2009, at 22:27:49

I just adopted the use of that word as an abreviation, and as others may say, it was easier than writing "psychiatrist" every time.
Receiving treatment for psychiatric symptoms is serious. In fact my mental health or lack thereof will affect everything I do and all the relationships in my life. I wish I didn't feel the need to see a psychiatrist and continue on meds, and/or perhaps I have just become quite accustomed to it all.
Don't worry about bringing this up (if you are inclined to), it's an interesting observation and good material for discussion.
be well,
sid

 

Re: the term 'pdoc'

Posted by alexandra_k on August 4, 2009, at 2:04:10

In reply to the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 3, 2009, at 22:27:49

> OK,here is something I have wanted to say to someone, anyone on any board where this is used. "Pdoc". I have seen it on boards besides this one. And I want to say "why don't you just say your psychiatrist?

I use 'p-doc' rather than 'psychiatrist' because it is faster to type and because it seems to be a conventional expression on boards to stand for 'psychiatrist'.

> pdoc bugs me. you want to know why? it sounds so friendly and casual, kind of chummy, non-assuming and as if the "pdoc" is a minor player on a team that is taking care of someone... So I feel people aren't being honest and sincere about the fact that they have serious issues since after all, they only see a "pdoc".

Do you think that you get that impression from the way that particular people talk about their p-docs - or is this more about you?

> And it scares me to think I will get criticized becuase of it. But I am getting used to people not liking me when I won't clone myself after them...

Do you think that others might feel criticized at your suggesting that people who use the term 'p-doc' have an inappropriate attitude towards their clinician or towards their troubles? How would you feel if someone suggested that insisting on the term 'psychiatrist' 'reminded them' of someone who held their clinicians at arms length and wasn't able to relate to them as a genuine human being (for example)?

 

Re: the term 'pdoc'

Posted by moonshadow on August 4, 2009, at 7:14:26

In reply to Re: the term 'pdoc', posted by alexandra_k on August 4, 2009, at 2:04:10

I'm not a huge fan of the term myself, mainly because it's not clear to people who aren't used to the lingo. My first thought when I came across the term was 'post-doc', someone who was working on their post-doctorate. But I'm easy to confuse in that way.

I know when I journal I occasionally will use my psychiatrist's last name, rather than "Dr. X", and it feels weird to me, so I don't do it. But I'm formal in that regard, and that's my psychiatrist's attitude too. I don't think she's ever said my first name. It's always "Ms. Shadow".

Pdoc is shorter, as is T. But I don't think anyone will care if you choose not to shorten and simply use the term psychiatrist. I find myself calling my psychiatrist my therapist, simply because it's easier than writing 'pdoc who does therapy'. Maybe I can call her my PTdoc?

 

Re: the term 'pdoc'

Posted by Phillipa on August 4, 2009, at 13:10:40

In reply to Re: the term 'pdoc', posted by moonshadow on August 4, 2009, at 7:14:26

I saw it used here when joined so kind of adopted the term as others have said easier to type. Phillipa

 

Re: the term 'pdoc'

Posted by friesandcoke on August 7, 2009, at 0:08:56

In reply to the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 3, 2009, at 22:27:49

I never thought I would find myself laughing at some of the answers to an issue that I raised which is "important" to me. But a couple of the replies here were so defensive and I knew that going in...that it would put some on edge because the term "pdoc" is widely accepted. I am really proud of myself for being able to laugh instead of seeking to retaliate with insulting replies.

 

Re: the term 'pdoc'

Posted by emilyp on August 7, 2009, at 0:19:06

In reply to Re: the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 7, 2009, at 0:08:56

I did not think any of the replies were defensive. It is fine to bring the topic up but the other replies were just as valid - I don't think it is fair to say they were defensive - which can be construed as an insulting comment.

 

Re: the term 'pdoc' friesandcoke

Posted by Deneb on August 7, 2009, at 2:23:55

In reply to Re: the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 7, 2009, at 0:08:56

I don't think there is anything to retaliate against. I think people are just trying to offer different views just like you and be helpful in their own way.

 

Re: the term 'pdoc' friesandcoke

Posted by fleeting flutterby on August 7, 2009, at 11:01:58

In reply to Re: the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 7, 2009, at 0:08:56

> I never thought I would find myself laughing at some of the answers to an issue that I raised which is "important" to me. But a couple of the replies here were so defensive and I knew that going in...that it would put some on edge because the term "pdoc" is widely accepted. I am really proud of myself for being able to laugh instead of seeking to retaliate with insulting replies.<,

---flutterby: Ouch. I thought all the replies to you seemed to be important as well, I bet they were to the owner of each post. I don't understand why you emphasize "important" just for you??.....-- and to have you say "you laughed" at a person's sincerity in reaching out to you and trying to help you--
well, I have nothing further to say.

 

Re: the term 'pdoc' friesandcoke

Posted by Nadezda on August 7, 2009, at 11:09:12

In reply to Re: the term 'pdoc', posted by friesandcoke on August 7, 2009, at 0:08:56

You found yourself "laughing at" people's attempts to be responsive to your comments? And you don't seek to "retaliate with insulting replies"? Hmmm.

Interesting.

Nadezda


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