Psycho-Babble Psychology Thread 564573

Shown: posts 1 to 25 of 25. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Sensory defensiveness test

Posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

I found this site on my own. Dr. Clueless and T are wrong that I have Asperger's, but sensory defensiveness seems to fit. I took it into my T and went through it with her. I socred a 22.

Now if only in T's words I could *get it through my thick stubborn head* that I am *brave for fighting it out in a very hard world and not curling up into a ball and hiding.* Today I feel like curling up into a ball. Later curling up with a bottle of wine.

Hopefully the link to the test works. It is very accurate for me. How do you score?

http://www.temple.edu/OT/Neuro_Behavioral_Center2.htm

Poet

 

11 Poet

Posted by gardenergirl on October 8, 2005, at 18:19:38

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

A lot of these questions are similar to Elaine Aron's Highly Sensitive Person quiz.

http://www.hsperson.com/pages/test.htm

And curling up in a ball is one way to "recharge" after sensory overload. And it sounds like you get more sensory stimulation (or are more sensitive to it) than the average bear.

Welcome to the "more than the average bear club".

gg

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet

Posted by alexandra_k on October 8, 2005, at 18:47:03

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

i score fairly high too...
it is a shame they don't vary the 'true' 'false' bit for a score to make those kinds of tests a little less transparent...

people tend to have a bias towards agreeing, saying 'yes' or 'true' as well...

 

22 First test....17 Second test

Posted by thuso on October 8, 2005, at 20:15:17

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

I definitely know a ton about sensory defensiveness. Too bad they didn't have much when I was a kid to deal with it.

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test

Posted by javableue on October 8, 2005, at 22:58:20

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

I got 20 on the first test, 24 on the second... I'd never really thought of it before, but I guess it does explain a lot. I can't stand a lot of the youth services I attend because the events are just so flashy and loud and overdone; I often need to leave the room a couple of times to unwind. (Actually, the first time I went to one of those things, when I was 14 and on medication which made the effect worse, I left enough times to make a security guard suspicious.) Touch is something I'm usually uncomfortable with, and my friends always poke fun at me for my reflexes... in fact, one of my classmates, who has a penchant for giving random hugs, tried to do so from behind, and before I knew what I was doing I ended up elbowing him sharply in the ribs.

I'm starting to think I should come with a warning label. On second thought, though, maybe I should bring this up with my T; he insists my aversion to touch is because of an intense need for it, which didn't entirely seem apt, but I didn't have any other idea when he suggested it.

jb

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet

Posted by Shortelise on October 9, 2005, at 1:36:10

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

That's fascinating, Poet. Really interesting. I rated a 13, and found that a few of the questions, in fact several, that I would have read as true 10 years ago are now false. That's progress, right?
I am too tired and too stressed right now to read much info about it, but I will do so when I am able. Too many rats in the maze today.

((Poet))

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet

Posted by Tamar on October 9, 2005, at 15:44:08

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

That's so interesting. I scored a 6, so I clearly don't have sensory defensiveness, but I think my daughter might score much higher. Thanks, Poet.

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test

Posted by 10derHeart on October 9, 2005, at 20:42:38

In reply to Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet, posted by Tamar on October 9, 2005, at 15:44:08

11, and then 15 on gg's other linked test.

Better than I used to be, but still pretty sensitive. This has gone hand in hand with ADD for me for a long time. Medication reduces it maybe 50% - one of the main reasons I stay on it (Strattera).

THE worst for me is visual stuff - lights, colors, too much clutter. Unmedicated, I used to freak out and cringe and get a stomach ache in stores like, for example, Target, where everything is RED AND bright AND busy....arrrgh!!! Much better these days, though.

It's great for others in your life to get a bit educated on this, because often if they are not this way themselves, they just have NO clue what you're so uncomfortable about. It's hard to explain, too.

My T. knows we can never start a session until he dims the lights, and that if he raises his voice, just in an excited way to make a point, I will sometimes startle or cringe....

Great post, Poet :-)

 

Good sensory defensiveness book

Posted by thuso on October 9, 2005, at 21:13:33

In reply to Re: Sensory defensiveness test, posted by 10derHeart on October 9, 2005, at 20:42:38

If you think you have sensory defensiveness, you should check out "Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight: What to Do If You Are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World". A lot of the book talks specifically about kids, but it is easily transferable to adults.

 

Re: Good sensory defensiveness book

Posted by gardenergirl on October 9, 2005, at 21:25:02

In reply to Good sensory defensiveness book, posted by thuso on October 9, 2005, at 21:13:33

Yep, great book.

Anyone else startle very easily and sort of jump and yelp when someone busts your concentration?

gg

 

Re: Good sensory defensiveness book gardenergirl

Posted by javableue on October 10, 2005, at 8:12:22

In reply to Re: Good sensory defensiveness book, posted by gardenergirl on October 9, 2005, at 21:25:02

>Anyone else startle very easily and sort of jump and yelp when someone busts your concentration?

Definitely. It angers my parents to no end, but I don't seem too able to control it that much.

jb

 

Re: Good sensory defensiveness book javableue

Posted by gardenergirl on October 10, 2005, at 8:16:21

In reply to Re: Good sensory defensiveness book gardenergirl, posted by javableue on October 10, 2005, at 8:12:22

Oh my...sorry it angers them. It makes my hubby laugh.

In fact, he "stomps" up the stairs when I'm upstairs to try NOT to startle me.

(((javablue)))

gg

 

Re: 11 gardenergirl

Posted by Poet on October 10, 2005, at 18:51:16

In reply to 11 Poet, posted by gardenergirl on October 8, 2005, at 18:19:38

Hi GG,

I scored 22 on this test, too.

All of this makes so much sense, it really explains what is wrong with me. I can't say right with me with scores of 22.

I feel like a defective bear.

Poet

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test alexandra_k

Posted by Poet on October 10, 2005, at 18:54:08

In reply to Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet, posted by alexandra_k on October 8, 2005, at 18:47:03

Hi Alex,

That I might have a bias for saying true/yes makes me feel a little better.

Though when I was going through it with my T she kept saying *this is so you.* *So much like my son, too.* Only once did she say that something was very much like her.

Poet

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test javableue

Posted by Poet on October 10, 2005, at 19:03:51

In reply to Re: Sensory defensiveness test, posted by javableue on October 8, 2005, at 22:58:20

Hi Javablue,

I'd bring the quiz into your T like I did. I think he'd be interested in how you scored, especially on physical contact.

I startle easily and if anybody came up behind me and hugged me I would scream and elbow them.

My T has never thought that my aversion to being touched was that I really had an intense need to be touched. She always thought that it was because as a little kid I wanted to be held and wasn't so grown me puts up barriers. I think that one makes more sense.

Let me know what your T says.

Poet

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test Shortelise

Posted by Poet on October 10, 2005, at 19:06:24

In reply to Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet, posted by Shortelise on October 9, 2005, at 1:36:10

Hi ShortE,

Scoring less today than how you would have ten years ago is definitely progress. I wonder if I would have scored less 10 years ago? Probably not, crowds, noises, certain fabrics, etc. have bothered me since I was a little kid.

Tell those other rats to get out of your maze. Then chew your way out yourself.

Poet

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test

Posted by Pfinstegg on October 10, 2005, at 19:07:15

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

I'm not sure if we're thinking about exactly the same thing, but my son (the one who got his PhD this week!) had a strange mixture of things wrong in childhood- he couldn't bear the pressure of holding a pencil, for example. We did sensory integration therapy 5 days a week for about ten years, and also got all the equipment and did it daily at home. He's completely OK now, but my point really is that I've heard that it's being done with adults much more now- now that it's known how much plasticity the brain has- and that the results are just as good in adults as they are in children.

 

Re: Good sensory defensiveness book thuso

Posted by Poet on October 10, 2005, at 19:17:25

In reply to Good sensory defensiveness book, posted by thuso on October 9, 2005, at 21:13:33

Hi Thuso,

I'm going to see if the library has the book. The Asperger's book that Dr. Clueless recommended (photocopied a chapter for me) is aimed at kids, too. My T is reading it and is going to lend it to me when she is done.

Poet

 

Re: Good sensory defensiveness book Poet

Posted by thuso on October 10, 2005, at 20:50:02

In reply to Re: Good sensory defensiveness book thuso, posted by Poet on October 10, 2005, at 19:17:25

>
> My T has never thought that my aversion to being touched was that I really had an intense need to be touched. She always thought that it was because as a little kid I wanted to be held and wasn't so grown me puts up barriers. I think that one makes more sense.
>
> Let me know what your T says.
>

I know that neither of those apply to me. My major aversion to being touched definitely has nothing to do with wanting to be held as a kid, but wasn't. My mom is a very touchy-feeling person, so getting touched and hugged would have been no problem. Even to this day I automatically squirm away when she tries to do anything physical. If I'm not expecting and prepared to be touched, I get horrible chills up my back and have to take at least a few steps away. From high school through college, whenever anyone would come towards me to give me a hug I would jump up in the air and jump backwards like I was being attacked. It must have been the funniest thing in the world to see. People would laugh at me all the time. :-P It seems to run in my family, so it must have something to do with my genes and how my brain is wired.

> Hi Thuso,
>
> I'm going to see if the library has the book. The Asperger's book that Dr. Clueless recommended (photocopied a chapter for me) is aimed at kids, too. My T is reading it and is going to lend it to me when she is done.
>
> Poet

What book did the Dr. recommend? Yeah, most AS related books are aimed at kids. It's only very recently that adults with AS have gotten any attention. There are books out there though. And you might want to do some searches online to read people's personal stories. That might be a better indicator to whether or not you really have AS. When the pdoc I worked for told me he was sure I had some degree of AS, I thought "no way!" But it's hard to argue with a pdoc who is one of the top autism child pdocs in the country, so I started reading other people's stories. Some I found were definitely not me, but those on the very high end (who can pass as a non-AS person) were extremely like me. Do all the reading and research you can before coming to any conclusions. I can tell you about my experience with this diagnosis if you want. I'm still getting used to the idea myself.

 

17 Poet

Posted by greyskyeyes on October 11, 2005, at 10:05:16

In reply to Sensory defensiveness test, posted by Poet on October 8, 2005, at 17:49:06

And 25 on the test GG linked to. Who would've thunk it?

It actually makes a ton of sense... I knew I was sensitive to all of these things but just never looked at them all together. I'm going to check out that book. And I think this'll be the topic of today's session! :) Will be interesting to see what my T has to say about this. (probably an 'it took you this long to figure it out?' type of reaction...)

My son's only 21 months but he's showing signs too. I think I'll check out the book on children, too, just in case. (yeah, with all the free time I have... will have to put it on my pile of books to read)

I'm glad you posted this, Poet - good topic!

~ grey

 

Re: Good sensory defensiveness book thuso

Posted by Poet on October 11, 2005, at 19:03:24

In reply to Re: Good sensory defensiveness book Poet, posted by thuso on October 10, 2005, at 20:50:02

Hi Thuso,

The book is "Asperger Syndrome and Sensory Issues"

I will do some more online research. I need to read what adults who weren't diagnosed as kids say about sensory defensiveness.

I still feel defective, but I do feel better since reading other peoples posts. I just hate the idea of another label being slapped on me.

Poet

 

Re: 17 greyskyeyes

Posted by Poet on October 11, 2005, at 19:08:22

In reply to 17 Poet, posted by greyskyeyes on October 11, 2005, at 10:05:16

Hi Greyskyeyes,

I have to admit that I never realized that so many of my traits are sensory defenses.

I sent a link in my response to Thuso for the book about kids with Asperger's.

I have so much I am trying to read, too. I can't read things about sensory defensiveness at work in the breakroom. Zero privacy there and everybody would be rude and ask what I'm reading and why. Darn weather- it's too cold to sit in my car anymore. Looks like I better bring a blanket and a thermos of hot chocolate.

Poet

 

Re: Good sensory defensiveness book Poet

Posted by thuso on October 12, 2005, at 0:33:13

In reply to Re: Good sensory defensiveness book thuso, posted by Poet on October 11, 2005, at 19:03:24

> I will do some more online research. I need to read what adults who weren't diagnosed as kids say about sensory defensiveness.
>

Let me know what you find out. I'm curious about it also.

> I still feel defective, but I do feel better since reading other peoples posts. I just hate the idea of another label being slapped on me.
>

You're not defective. Everyone in the world is different from other people in their own ways. A lot of us are just more sensitive to sensory stimulation, nothing to feel defective about. And about the AS, the more reading I'm doing the more I'm seeing that it's not a defective thing either. It's just that your brain is stronger in certain things and weaker in others than most people. Do you agree that everyone has their strengths and weaknesses? That's how I've started looking at it.

For curiosity's sake, take these two tests:
Empathy Quotient - http://www.guardian.co.uk/life/flash/page/0,13249,937836,00.html
Systemizing Quotient - http://www.guardian.co.uk/life/flash/page/0,13249,937835,00.html

I'm curious to see if you are as extreme as I am on those two tests. :-P (I'm the lowest bracket on the EQ and the highest bracket on the SQ)

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet

Posted by javableue on October 12, 2005, at 23:04:17

In reply to Re: Sensory defensiveness test javableue, posted by Poet on October 10, 2005, at 19:03:51

I'll see if I can manage to bring it up in this week's session... I'm in one of those periods where I'm no longer silent in therapy anymore, and am lucky if I get through half of the most pressing things on my mind! I have to decide about a trip I may be taking over the Christmas holidays, so unfortunately that will likely take up an undue chunk of the session. He might let me e-mail the results, though.

jb

 

Re: Sensory defensiveness test javableue

Posted by Poet on October 13, 2005, at 17:53:07

In reply to Re: Sensory defensiveness test Poet, posted by javableue on October 12, 2005, at 23:04:17

Hi Javablue,

I haven't had a period in therapy where there is no silence.

Keep me updated whenever you get time to talk/email about it with your T.

Poet


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