Psycho-Babble Psychology Thread 393889

Shown: posts 49 to 73 of 135. Go back in thread:

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl

Posted by Daisym on January 5, 2005, at 10:55:24

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by gardenergirl on January 4, 2005, at 23:37:29

I love that book. But I think you shouldn't read it right now. It will frustrate you with your placement even further.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl

Posted by TofuEmmy on January 5, 2005, at 12:10:01

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by gardenergirl on January 4, 2005, at 23:37:29

"The GIFT of Therapy" Oy, that Yalom has an ego the size of Yonkers. ;-)

emmy

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by gardenergirl on January 5, 2005, at 22:56:17

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl, posted by Daisym on January 5, 2005, at 10:55:24

Daisy,
I think you are rigth in that it will only reinforce to me what I wish I could be doing. But I like to leave it on my bookshelf in the office to either foster curiosity on my Supervisor's part, or just to bug him. :)

gg

 

Cool, glad you liked it. (nm) Dinah

Posted by gardenergirl on January 5, 2005, at 22:56:59

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl, posted by Dinah on January 5, 2005, at 4:21:45

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books TofuEmmy

Posted by gardenergirl on January 5, 2005, at 22:58:03

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl, posted by TofuEmmy on January 5, 2005, at 12:10:01

Hi, I think therapy is a gift too. And you don't think I have a big ego...

Hey.....


;)

gg

 

Re: double double quotes TofuEmmy

Posted by Dr. Bob on January 5, 2005, at 23:50:36

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl, posted by TofuEmmy on January 5, 2005, at 12:10:01

> "The GIFT of Therapy"

I'd just like to plug the double double quotes feature at this site:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/faq.html#amazon

The first time anyone refers to a book, movie, or music without using this option, I post this to try to make sure he or she at least knows about it. It's just an option, though, and doesn't *have* to be used. If people *choose* not to use it, I'd be interested why not, but I'd like that redirected to Psycho-Babble Administration:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/admin/20020918/msgs/7717.html

Thanks!

Bob

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl

Posted by Dinah on January 6, 2005, at 3:50:20

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books TofuEmmy, posted by gardenergirl on January 5, 2005, at 22:58:03

But I'd have to agree that either Yalom really does have a big ego, or he's as good as Daisy's therapist. :)

 

Re: double double quotes Dr. Bob

Posted by TofuEmmy on January 6, 2005, at 10:20:56

In reply to Re: double double quotes TofuEmmy, posted by Dr. Bob on January 5, 2005, at 23:50:36

Oh jeeper creepers Dr. Bobert...the book's url had already been posted. How's a girl supposed to stay in her "witty zone" if she has do that quote quote crud.

Do you mean if we were to have a lengthy discussion of one book, 40 screens long, you'd want each of us, each time to double quote the darn thing?? Don't you think once is sufficient?

Suggestion number two....witty repartee (even if it's not that witty) s/b excluded from all rules....especially the "no sarcasm" rule. ;-)

emmy

 

Re: oops, missed that, sorry! (nm) TofuEmmy

Posted by Dr. Bob on January 7, 2005, at 0:33:13

In reply to Re: double double quotes Dr. Bob, posted by TofuEmmy on January 6, 2005, at 10:20:56

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by littleone on January 11, 2005, at 21:13:21

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

I was wondering if anyone had read "Ego State Therapy" by Gordon Emmerson and if so, what you thought of it. It looks really promising on Amazon, but I already have a zillion psych books (with more on order).

The other one that caught my eye was "Ego States: Theory and Therapy" by John G Watkins. It looks a lot heavier, but still very interesting.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by littleone on January 16, 2005, at 16:09:20

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by littleone on January 11, 2005, at 21:13:21

Thought I would share that I've found the following book helpful:

"Emotional Release for Children" by Mark Pearson & Patricia Nolan.

These people do therapy for children and the book is filled with the different type of exercises they use. Some are about journalling, drawing, creative writing, body awareness, Gestalt work, dream work, visualisation and relaxation. But the biggy for me is emotional release.

I've done a couple of the exercises and I was really amazed as to how easily I was thrown back into my childhood feelings. It has been helpful for me. I also like the fact there are specific exercises to follow rather than the generalisations found in many psych books.

Also, I have a lot of trouble with feeling nothingness and not being able to look inside myself at my thoughts and feelings. There are some good exercises to help with this.

 

Book I absolutely should not read but surely will

Posted by Dinah on January 23, 2005, at 19:48:05

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

"The Dependent Patient: A Practitioner's Guide"

 

feeling good by david burns (nm)

Posted by ghost on January 28, 2005, at 20:03:25

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

 

Do these books look familiar?

Posted by Dinah on February 7, 2005, at 21:04:31

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

They're in my Amazon "later" basket, which usually means someone recommended them and I didn't have time to look at them thoroughly.

Does anyone remember reading any of these? What did you think of them?

"The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Building and Rebuilding the Human Brain" by Louis Cozolino

"Affect Dysregulation and Disorders of the Self/Affect Regulation and the Repair of the Self (two-volume set)" by Allan N. Schore

"A General Theory of Love (Vintage)"
by THOMAS LEWIS, FARI AMINI, RICHARD LANNON

"The Fantasy Bond : Structure of Psychological Defenses" by Robert W., Ph.D. Firestone


Also, I'm scaring myself witless right now by reading

"How Much is Enough? Endings in Psychotherapy and Counselling" by Lesley Murdin

Unless I'm reading it wrong, or leaving out pertinent facts from my therapy, it appears that Lesley Murdin is saying that my therapist should terminate me against my wishes. It has me scared enough that I almost bit off my therapist's head when he mentioned that we were at an impasse in a discussion the other day.

Why do I torment myself with these books and internet articles? I think I feel like I need to have a dissenting viewpoint.

 

A General Theory of Love Dinah

Posted by pegasus on February 8, 2005, at 11:07:00

In reply to Do these books look familiar?, posted by Dinah on February 7, 2005, at 21:04:31

Hi Dinah,

I read A General Theory of Love, and I found it fascinating and helpful. It really helped me understand some of my relationships better. Especially the power of my relationship with my therapist. It's mostly about attachment, and how that is part of the wiring of mammals. Apparently, it drives all types of behavior that might seem mysterious, but is really designed to enhance our survival.

It has an evolutionary slant, so if that is bothersome, this wouldn't be a satisfying book to read.

pegasus

 

Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Dinah on February 18, 2005, at 11:52:11

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

I am perhaps being premature here, because I've just started the book and may find by the end that I hate it.

But I'm reading "The Anatomy of Dependence". While this is, to some extent, a commentary on Japanese culture, it is also an exploration of the concept of "amae", a word for which there is apparently no adequate English equivilant.

But it awakes in me an excitement that is based on the idea of limitations in Western language and concepts to explain what are probably universal conditions. And that if we had a different language, we might view things differently. Or that pathology may be, to some degree, a matter of cultural biases and language limitations.

 

Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Dinah on March 17, 2005, at 22:14:56

In reply to Book I absolutely should not read but surely will, posted by Dinah on January 23, 2005, at 19:48:05

Well, my copy of "The Dependent Patient: A Practitioner's Guide" came in. And it didn't scare me silly in the way I thought it would. You know, I thought it would be one of those books that would tell therapists how to set firm boundaries with the clients from h*ll that they all hate to see. But so far it's not that at all.

Now it's scaring me in a completely different way. I am having this intense ah-hah moment of enlightenment.

It talks about how dependent personalities don't always present in the stereotypical passive and helpless way, and that the DSM-IV makes it difficult for practitioners to correctly assess dependency by insisting on linking dependency with passivity and helplessness.

"Persons who are highly motivated to seek guidance and support will use a variety of relationship-facilitating self-presentation strategies to strengthen ties to potential caregivers and maximize the probability that they will obtain the protection and support that they desire."

It explains so very many things about my life. I have been absolutely relentless and singleminded about maintaining dependency. It's just that the way to do that in my family of origin had nothing to do with appearing passive or helpless. So it would appear on the surface that I'm overly detached and care little about attaching to others (with the startling exception of my therapist). I'm not at all compliant with the people I'm dependent on. But when thinking about the reality of life with my parents, and teachers, etc. it's clear that my behaviors have always been designed to bring the approval of and attachment to authority figures.

My attachment to my therapist is not an anomaly at all. It's just that different behaviors elicit the desired outcome with him than with other authority figures, so I modify my behavior accordingly. And he has allowed me to get my way in this. He's completely caved in to my dependency needs. And it's not that they haven't been met in my life. They've been met with astonishing regularity. Every ounce of my not inconsiderable intellect has revolved around getting those needs met, and I've managed to achieve my goals as often as not.

D*mned if I'm going to share this insight with my therapist though. It might cause him to yank away the dependency rug, and I just can't bear that. Especially since I've lost the other main person I was dependent on - my father. Ok, that was a weird mutually beneficial, mutually dependent, symbiotic relationship. But still...

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Dinah

Posted by Susan47 on March 18, 2005, at 9:09:28

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on March 17, 2005, at 22:14:56

Thank you for your post on this book, Dinah.. I'm going to look into getting it. Wishing my ex-T had known how to handle the situation isn't going to change anything, wishing won't change anything but maybe knowledge will.

 

Help, Dinah Dinah

Posted by Susan47 on March 18, 2005, at 9:12:18

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on March 17, 2005, at 22:14:56

Darn I can't search inside the book, is it a good read? I mean, you know, does it flow well? Like for example, Yalom?

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Dinah

Posted by gardenergirl on March 18, 2005, at 13:50:26

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on March 17, 2005, at 22:14:56

Just added this to my Amazon wish list. I should ask my dad for a gift card to Amazon this year instead of Target or Pier One like he usually does. Imagine how high the pile of books on my nightstand would get!

Thanks for the update.

gg

 

In fact, help..I've been sucked into Amazon!

Posted by gardenergirl on March 18, 2005, at 14:58:40

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Dinah, posted by gardenergirl on March 18, 2005, at 13:50:26

And I can't get out! I think I even have two Amazon windows open...

Somebody call shopping 911! Booksaholics! I need an intervention fast! Please, tough love!

;)

gg

 

Rules about books gardenergirl

Posted by daisym on March 18, 2005, at 18:43:20

In reply to In fact, help..I've been sucked into Amazon!, posted by gardenergirl on March 18, 2005, at 14:58:40

If you buy a new one, you must give away an old one. If you finish one, you can then buy another new one. Unless you find the one you want on sale. And then you can buy it right then. Or if the moon is up and the book was facing east...then you can buy it. Or, it was in black ink on the web page...then -- well you get the picture.

I finally put a bookshelf next to my side of the bed since the night stand was too full. Now the bookshelf is full, I need another one.

 

Re: Rules about books daisym

Posted by gardenergirl on March 18, 2005, at 19:33:21

In reply to Rules about books gardenergirl, posted by daisym on March 18, 2005, at 18:43:20

Um, I've been calling it a nightstand, but it's really a bookshelf! And it's full! Although admittedly, a CD player takes up one of the shelves. Gotta have my peaceful white noise...

Good rules, though.

Do you think 47 is too many for a wish list? Gah!

Thanks,

gg

 

Re: Rules about books

Posted by Dinah on March 18, 2005, at 22:43:49

In reply to Rules about books gardenergirl, posted by daisym on March 18, 2005, at 18:43:20

lol. Our bedroom is small, and my husband gave me one of my son's old rolling diaper carts to keep the books I have yet to read on. It collapsed under the weight. :)

So while we're redoing the library, I'm intending to put in a new system. I've got all the books on a database, and I'll just mark the ones I haven't read yet, then go hunt them up on the bookshelves if I want to read them. Hmmm... I'll have to add a half finished checkmark. I usually start all my new books and have thirty or forty half read ones lying about all over.

 

Re: Help, Dinah Susan47

Posted by Dinah on March 18, 2005, at 22:49:30

In reply to Help, Dinah Dinah, posted by Susan47 on March 18, 2005, at 9:12:18

No, it's no Yalom.

It's very clinical in tone, so far at least - and I'm halfway through.

When I was discussing it with my therapist today I couldn't remember half of the right words and I wasn't sure I was getting my point across. But from his responses, I think I probably did ok.

He seemed to agree with me. Perhaps it's something he's always known about me. But he sees how it could be playing a big role in my work motivation problems.

Geesh. You'd think the reward of getting paid would be enough. Got to get the income to buy those books, after all.

(Oh, and most importantly, he said that he wouldn't decide that because I was dependent, he'd have to peck me out of the nest. He says that any weaning to be done will be done by me, not him. He's not going to push me to do anything I don't want to do.)


Go forward in thread:


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Psychology | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

Script revised: February 4, 2008
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-17 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.