Psycho-Babble Psychology Thread 393889

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Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by allisonf on September 27, 2004, at 19:41:15

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by ron1953 on September 27, 2004, at 17:12:23

I'm going to try the double quotes thing...

"The Noonday Demon" by Andrew Solomon is amazing. He writes about his own experience with depression (which is unbelievably insightful) and then follows that with a rich telling of the history of depression and it's cultural/societal implications. Highly recommended!!

Also, another good one about bipolar is "Electroboy" by Andy Behrman.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books ron1953

Posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 11:04:51

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by ron1953 on September 27, 2004, at 17:12:23

I have both of these and just reread Unholy. They are sad and moving and I'm just so relieved that someone else felt the way I feel. I want to MAKE my family read them, but of course then I'd actually have to admit to something being wrong.

I also love "Undercurrent". Marsha Manning contributed to "Unholy Ghosts" too. Her book is a journal and it is just beautiful. When I read it, I took in one of the entries to my therapist and said, "this is exactly how I feel."

Do you like these books because you felt validated?

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 11:18:21

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books ron1953, posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 11:04:51

Daisy:

Not so much validated as enlightened. Some of the stories helped me accept that my condition is chronic but not terminal. Some showed that there are depressives that have it tougher than I. I, too, would like to make some people (non-depressives) read Unholy Ghost so maybe they'd understand a little better. Thanks for the recommendation for Undercurrent - I'll go to the liberry (LOL) and check it out (pun unintentional).

Ron

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 14:21:55

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym, posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 11:18:21

Let me know if you like it. What I liked about Ghosts was that there were men and women writers. I often wonder if men and women see depression differently. Another of my favorite books (just for fun) is "Tales from a Flying Couch" and the author describes his own war with depression.

Do you have a male therapist or female? And does he/she ask you to describe how you feel beyond saying "depressed"? I find this hard...sad doesn't say enough, frustrated isn't quite right. My therapist also wants to know where the pain sits in my body, or the heaviness. Which is an interesting exercise, to try to locate it. Once it was in my left ear. Hmmm...

 

fun therapy books

Posted by badhaircut on September 28, 2004, at 17:38:27

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

"Celebrities on the Couch: Personal Adventures of Famous People in Psychoanalysis" [no Amazon] has stories from Patty Duke and Vivian Vance and other stars about how therapy "cured" them, compiled by Lucy Freeman in 1967. It really made me completely distrust celebrities (and be skeptical of other people) when they publicly say, "Oh, I'm cured now!" It's pretty poignant: Patty Duke's problems had hardly begun when she said in this that she was All Better Now. Hard to find, but a great read.

"Children of Psychiatrists" by Thomas Maeder (1990) is a lot of fun. Are shrinks' kids crazy? Well, according to those interviewed by Maeder, their parents are. Amazon Used has this for $1.50! I've got to get it.

"What the Butler Saw", a *hilarious* 1967 play by Joe Orton, has nothing to do with butlers; it's set in a psychiatrist's office. I've thought of posting excerpts here, just for fun. One of the pdocs has an entire family committed in straightjackets and carted off to an asylum. (It's his own family, of course.)

"Cheap Psychological Tricks" by Perry Buffington PhD (1996) has 60 amusing little tips based on psych research (citations included), like, If you're going to take cuts in a long line, cut in near the very front. People near the front aren't as anxious about getting pushed back....

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by gardenergirl on September 28, 2004, at 19:33:42

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 14:21:55

Are you sure that you weren't on the phone a great deal just before that session, Daisy? ;)

just being funny....I hope.

gg

 

pain in the ear gardenergirl

Posted by daisym on September 28, 2004, at 19:51:01

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym, posted by gardenergirl on September 28, 2004, at 19:33:42

I was trying to remember if I had been talking to my mother...

My therapist thought it was hilarious. And then he said he hoped I hadn't been talking to him.


I said no, that he gave me pain elsewhere. (evil grin.)

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 23:31:08

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 14:21:55

Daisy:

I'll try to get the book soon. I read quickly and will give you my thoughts after I've finished. My shrink is a woman - old enough to be my mother. We "connected" immediately and have a lot of similar views about a lot of things. Thus, there's a lot I don't have to explain at length in order for her to understand. She is the rare psychiatrist who doesn't have a big ego. She's in the business because she really cares about people (imagine that!). No, she doesn't ask me what I'd consider stupid questions. I'm pretty good at describing how I feel and probably make it easier for both of us. We've been working as a team for over 5 years and we learn a lot from each other.

Ron

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by daisym on September 29, 2004, at 0:36:24

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym, posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 23:31:08

How does the female/male dynamic work for you? I have a male therapist and we have been working together for 16 months. Given that we are working on depression and csa issues, typically the "mixed" set up is not recommended. It works for me. Of course, I think I have a pretty good therapist. He is completely invested in the relationship and I haven't seen much ego. He is willing to work with both the adult side and child sides that have emerged in therapy. It feels odd, but it seems to be working.

Does you therapist recommend books? We had a discussion today about my need to research topics. My therapist is a big fan of Kohut. I think I'll ask tomorrow about a book recommendation.

By the way...welcome to babble. I haven't seen you on the board before, are you new or returning from a break?

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books daisym

Posted by ron1953 on September 29, 2004, at 9:06:42

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by daisym on September 29, 2004, at 0:36:24

Daisy:

I don't think I'm a sexist, so the male/female thing with my current shrink doesn't seem to be a factor. My prior experiences with docs of either sex weren't very productive and didn't last long, except for one (he was a Psychologist).

Funny, but I'm the one who recommends books to her, mostly in the interest of passing the recommendations on to other patients who might benefit. I don't know if she reads them and/or passes on the recommendations. BTW, I never heard of Kohut before. I think I might be particularly interested in "Analysis of the Self: Systematic Approach to Treatment of Narcissistic Personality Disorders" because I think my 23-year-old son may fall into this category, and I'd like to learn more about it. Otherwise, I'm not much into traditional analysis/talk therapy.

I've been on Babble for about a month but mostly on the medication board. Now I'm spending more time in books, social, relationships and this one. Of course, there's some overlap - so I learn a lot on all of them. This is an excellent web site with something for nearly anyone.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Dinah on October 16, 2004, at 11:13:05

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

I'm fond of all of the books of Irvin Yalom, but one of my favorites is "Every Day Gets a Little Closer: A Twice-Told Therapy". Mostly because I'm intrigued with the concept. I think most case studies should have a rebuttal by the client. :)

I often wonder if my therapist and I would tell the same tale of our therapy. I think we're getting closer over time.

 

fun therapy books -- Thanx (nm) badhaircut

Posted by 64bowtie on October 16, 2004, at 14:26:43

In reply to fun therapy books, posted by badhaircut on September 28, 2004, at 17:38:27

 

A French one awaiting translation, I hope!

Posted by Clarinette on November 14, 2004, at 20:16:57

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

I'm sorry but I think this book only exists in French as yet, it was only published last year (maybe the canadians can make some use of it). However, take a note of this guys name, when this gets translated, you must read it immediately! It's the clearest most approachable book that I've come across to date for bipos and their famillies.

'Des hauts et des bas qui pertubent votre vie - aide et conseils aux mainiaco-depressifs et leur famille' by Michel ROCHET, editions Chiron. The title translates roughly as 'The ups and downs which upset your life - help and advice for maniaco-depresives and their famillies'

Hope you'll be able to read it one day.

Oh there's also 'Le mirroir de janus' by Sami-Paul Tawil, editions Pocket.

Happy reading,
Clara

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Dinah

Posted by Dinah on December 17, 2004, at 16:15:12

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

I've been doing a lousy job of keeping this thread alive, but I do think it's a good thread.

One of the first books on psychology that meant a lot to me was "Cutting" by Steven Levenkron. I'm not sure that the information in it is the latest, but the description of the caring therapeutic relationship woke a sort of longing in me.

On the other hand, I choose not to read it often just for that reason. It makes me disappointed that my therapist isn't as wonderful as he describes himself as being.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Dinah

Posted by daisym on December 17, 2004, at 18:48:20

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Dinah, posted by Dinah on December 17, 2004, at 16:15:12

Dinah,

I know what you mean. I read stuff and people have these "ah ha" moments or they only need things reframed once and they move on. When I read Yalom, I often wonder if he is as good and caring as he says he is.

I just read another book called "A General Theory of Love" and I learned a lot about the function of attachment and how the brain works. It was a fairly easy read and helped me understand myself some. Particularly because there is a discussion of the distracted mother and the fall out from that. I often think of abandonment issues around moms being completely unavailable. But this research talks about how a distracted mother can result in a child who is emotionally disorganized and doesn't learn to internalize things, like coping or calming methods.

 

Re: Useful psych books *trigger* Dinah

Posted by littleone on December 18, 2004, at 16:48:22

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Dinah, posted by Dinah on December 17, 2004, at 16:15:12

Dinah,

The book you quote is an excellent one. It didn't help me stop cutting as such, but it did help to normalise it and helped me understand the why's a bit better.

I tried leaving it lying around the house in the hopes that my husband would pick it up and try to understand why I do it, but no such luck :(

I can really relate to what you say about being disappointed that your own T doesn't live up to the authoring T. But I tend to do the opposite. When my T falls short, I gobble up Yalom's books in the hopes that he can give me what I need instead.

 

Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Dinah on January 4, 2005, at 8:10:14

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

Has anyone read

"The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Building and Rebuilding the Human Brain"

The premise looks interesting, but I've already got a stack of unread books. Is this one worth it?

 

Haven't read it yet, but... Dinah

Posted by Klokka on January 4, 2005, at 19:07:40

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on January 4, 2005, at 8:10:14

I've seen it on my pdoc's bookshelf. Creepy! It's actually related to a topic I'm considering for a project I'll be starting soon for school, so I might end up reading it anyway. I'll let you know if I do.

 

Re: Thanks!!! (nm) Klokka

Posted by Dinah on January 4, 2005, at 20:34:31

In reply to Haven't read it yet, but... Dinah, posted by Klokka on January 4, 2005, at 19:07:40

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by daisym on January 4, 2005, at 22:28:17

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on January 4, 2005, at 8:10:14

I am in the middle of reading "thoughts without a thinker" by Mark Epstein. Actually I'm jumping all around in it. It is a book about Psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective. I find myself in tears on many of the pages but it really resonates with me.

I know it is an oldish book, about 10 years now. Someone gave it to me for Christmas.


I also recently finished "A General Theory of Love" by Thomas Lewis, which was recommended by someone here. I really liked it. It had a lot of brain stuff in it, as related to attachment and memory.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by gardenergirl on January 4, 2005, at 23:37:29

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by daisym on January 4, 2005, at 22:28:17

I just started reading "The Gift of Therapy : An Open Letter to a New Generation of Therapists and Their Patients" by Yalom. It's wonderful so far. I highly recommend it!

gg

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl

Posted by Dinah on January 5, 2005, at 4:21:45

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by gardenergirl on January 4, 2005, at 23:37:29

I liked it too.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl

Posted by Daisym on January 5, 2005, at 10:55:24

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by gardenergirl on January 4, 2005, at 23:37:29

I love that book. But I think you shouldn't read it right now. It will frustrate you with your placement even further.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl

Posted by TofuEmmy on January 5, 2005, at 12:10:01

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by gardenergirl on January 4, 2005, at 23:37:29

"The GIFT of Therapy" Oy, that Yalom has an ego the size of Yonkers. ;-)

emmy

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by gardenergirl on January 5, 2005, at 22:56:17

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl, posted by Daisym on January 5, 2005, at 10:55:24

Daisy,
I think you are rigth in that it will only reinforce to me what I wish I could be doing. But I like to leave it on my bookshelf in the office to either foster curiosity on my Supervisor's part, or just to bug him. :)

gg


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