Psycho-Babble Psychology Thread 393889

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Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books cubic_me

Posted by Dinah on September 23, 2004, at 9:29:53

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by cubic_me on September 23, 2004, at 3:54:21

To do the links, you do two " in front of the name and two " in back of the name. I'd type "" if I could, but it won't let me.

 

Well, dang. It did let me. (nm)

Posted by Dinah on September 23, 2004, at 9:30:37

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books cubic_me, posted by Dinah on September 23, 2004, at 9:29:53

 

Re: My favorite workbooks

Posted by Dinah on September 23, 2004, at 9:39:11

In reply to Re: My favorite books on dissociation, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:24:11

Another reasonably short list.

"Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder" by Marsha Linehan blends cognitive behavior therapy approach with eastern philosophy to create her dialectical behavior therapy. I think it's useful for just about anyone, especially those who have trouble with emotional regulation. It's not just for those with Borderline Personality Disorder.

I like her videos too. (Yes, I did. I had to sell a bunch of stuff on eBay, but I did.)

http://behavioraltech.org/store/products.cfm?category=Videos

I also like the first workbook my therapist used with me, a CBT workbook called "The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook".

And while they aren't technically workbooks, I found two CBT oriented books very helpful for my OCD. "Stop Obsessing" by Foa was my favorite. But "Brain Lock" was pretty good too.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Miss Honeychurch on September 23, 2004, at 10:11:35

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by cubic_me on September 23, 2004, at 3:54:21

Albert Ellis' "Guide to Rational Living" has helped me quite a bit. Though it was written in the late '50s and not updated really since the early '60s, the concepts are still helpful. A lot of the language is a little old fashioned, but that just makes it quirky.

Ellis is the father of REBT and this book is very helpful for people doing CBT. I keep it on my nightstand!

 

Albert Ellis

Posted by shortelise on September 23, 2004, at 13:36:49

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Miss Honeychurch on September 23, 2004, at 10:11:35

I think there is
"A New Guide to Rational Living" from the 80's

ShortE

 

Re: Albert Ellis shortelise

Posted by Miss Honeychurch on September 23, 2004, at 14:15:19

In reply to Albert Ellis, posted by shortelise on September 23, 2004, at 13:36:49

I'll have to check that out! Thanks for the tip.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books mair

Posted by gardenergirl on September 23, 2004, at 17:59:32

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books gardenergirl, posted by mair on September 23, 2004, at 7:50:06

Thanks, Mair. I'll have to add that to my ever-growing list of post-doc reading. Someday.....

:)

gg

 

Re: My favorite workbooks....and another book Dinah

Posted by gardenergirl on September 23, 2004, at 18:11:57

In reply to Re: My favorite workbooks, posted by Dinah on September 23, 2004, at 9:39:11

> > I also like the first workbook my therapist used with me, a CBT workbook called "The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook".

Ah yes, this is a great book. I used with a client with agoraphobia and panic attacks. She really loved it, and acutally, I think she suggested it to me, come to think of it.
>
>

I just started working through Elaine Aron's "The Highly Sensitive Person's Workbook: The Practical Guide for Highly Sensitive People and Hsp Support Groups" recently. It has all the information from her book, "The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You" which I have read and re-read...love that book! But the workbook also has pages for journalling about the exercises she suggests. It can also be used in a group, which I think would be really cool to do. I almost suggested forming a group online here to work through it together when we had that empathic people thread, but I didn't feel I could fully commit to it just now. Maybe later....

Enjoying this thread.

gg

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Speaker on September 23, 2004, at 22:23:55

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books mair, posted by gardenergirl on September 23, 2004, at 17:59:32

The book that clicked with me is "Living From the Heart Jesus Gave You". If you are a Christian it is a tremendous book. It answered a lot about Disassociation, Dividedness and other things about mental health and how all of that fits with Christianity. It was very freeing for me! It was written by several Dr.s from The Shepherd's House in Pasadena, CA. in 1999.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by tryingtobewise on September 23, 2004, at 23:10:32

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

I always find "Feeling Good" by David Burns, MD to be encouraging (all about CBT). I love the book "Worry" by Edward Hallowell, MD.

"The Shelter of Each Other" by Mary Pipher, Ph.D. has some very interesting perspectives on therapy. I also love an early book of hers called "Hunger Pains".

I have no idea if I'm doing the double quotes right. I hope so.

:) Kim

 

Re: double double quotes Speaker

Posted by Dr. Bob on September 24, 2004, at 16:29:56

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Speaker on September 23, 2004, at 22:23:55

> The book that clicked with me is "Living From the Heart Jesus Gave You". If you are a Christian it is a tremendous book...

I'd just like to plug the double double quotes feature at this site:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/faq.html#amazon

The first time anyone refers to a book, movie, or music without using this option, I post this to try to make sure he or she at least knows about it. It's just an option, though, and doesn't *have* to be used. If people *choose* not to use it, I'd be interested why not, but I'd like that redirected to Psycho-Babble Administration:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/admin/20020918/msgs/7717.html

Thanks!

Bob

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Speaker

Posted by RosieOGrady on September 24, 2004, at 18:00:20

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Speaker on September 23, 2004, at 22:23:55

I looked that book up on Amazon and all they had was used paperbacks and the prices started at 175.00 dollars!!!It must be a REALLY good book.

It does sound fascinating. It's hard to find good Christian psychology book. I read the Minreth Meyer book 'Happiness is a Choice" and was disappointed in it. Although there were some good tips, I believe with depression happiness isn't ALWAYS a choice.


> The book that clicked with me is "Living From the Heart Jesus Gave You". If you are a Christian it is a tremendous book. It answered a lot about Disassociation, Dividedness and other things about mental health and how all of that fits with Christianity. It was very freeing for me! It was written by several Dr.s from The Shepherd's House in Pasadena, CA. in 1999.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books RosieOGrady

Posted by Speaker on September 24, 2004, at 20:39:55

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Speaker, posted by RosieOGrady on September 24, 2004, at 18:00:20

It is a GOOD book but it is a very small book...I think I paid 7.95. It might be worth checking with the Shepherd House and see if you can get a copy directly from them. I didn't list all the authors but if you want them I would be glad to. Also, I'm not much for the it's all a choice thing. I always think about Elijah and how after he won the battle he ran off and was depressed and God sent and angle to feed him not just once but twice...seems to me if it was just a choice God would have said "Get up and choose to get better"! Instead God fed him and took care of him. That's what I like about this book it's called The Life Model and deals with truth not choice. Hope you get a copy and we can discuse it.

Speaker

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by fallsfall on September 25, 2004, at 21:27:56

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books RosieOGrady, posted by Speaker on September 24, 2004, at 20:39:55

I have a fairly extensive collection... Most of mine are technical - written for therapists. I'll list them over time in no particular order...

"The Analysis of the Transference in the here and now" by Gregory P. Bauer. This one gives a really good understanding of transference. From the chapter entitled "Working Through" (yes, a whole chapter!): "This mastery of conflictual, self-defeating behavior often first occurs by means of practice with the therapist in their here-and-now relationship. As the patient gains an awareness of his manner of relating to the therapist, of what brings about this relationship pattern, as well as what its consequences are, the opportunity to behave in a different fashion is made possible."

"Changing Mind-sets : The Potential Unconscious" by Maria Carmen Gear, Ernesto Cesar Liendo and Lila Lee Scott. This is the best book I have ever seen on the Unconscious. It is quite technical. It talks about how stuff gets into the Unconscious and out of it, and how this relates to therapy techniques. I was really clueless about unconscious motivations, this book helped me to accept that I *have* an unconscious and feel more comfortable about how it works. I borrowed it from the library and then bought a used copy online.

"The Dance of Anger : A Woman's Guide to Changing the Patterns of Intimate Relationships" by Harriet Goldhor Lerner, Ph.D. This book is not really about anger. I think that any person who is in a relationship with anyone (parent, child, spouse, friend, therapist) should read this book. It talks about how patterns in the relationship (i.e. dominant/submissive, controlling/powerless, abusing/abused) are maintained by BOTH people in the relationship. It talks about what happens when one person tries to change these patterns - what the effectis on the other person, and what the other person will do in response. This information can help us to understand the dynamics of change, and see what might be making changes hard for us. It's not a long book, it is written for the general public, you should be able to find at least one copy at any mid-sized used book sale. I pick them up as I find them and give them away to people...

"Healing the Soul in the Age of the Brain : Becoming Conscious in an Unconscious World" by Elio Frattaroli, M.D. This is one of the books I got from my library when I was researching the Unconscious. My dog decided that it tasted good, so I had the opportunity to buy it from my library - but I really do like this book, so I wasn't unhappy to "have" to buy it. The most important theme that I got from this book is the difference between "The Swimming Pool" and "The Quest". Both are metaphors for life. In The Swimming Pool we spend all of our energy trying to stay afloat - to keep from drowning. In The Quest we are focused, instead, more on the big picture - where we want to go. The book talks about how both are necessary at different times. It has a section, also, called "Experiencing the Psychotherapeutic Process"...


 

Useful psychology and psychotherapy books - BPD

Posted by fallsfall on September 25, 2004, at 22:18:26

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by fallsfall on September 25, 2004, at 21:27:56

These are my favorite Borderline Personality Disorder books.

"Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder" by Marsha Linehan. This book made me feel understood (maybe for the first time). It also helped me understand why my therapist would do certain things, and what I could do to help friends of mine who also have BPD. It has great sections on suicide risks, and on acceptance vs. change.

"Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder" also by Marsha Linehan. This is the manual for DBT. It gives a briefer overview of Linehan's theory of BPD. It describes how the DBT skills are taught. And it has a wonderful section on emotions - pages of emotion words (for those of us whose emotional vocabulary is stunted...).

"Psychodynamic Psychotherapy of Borderline Patients" by Otto F. Kernberg, Michael A. Selzer, Harold W. Koenigsberg, Arthur C. Carr, Ann H. Appelbaum. Linehan's books give the CBT view of BPD, this book gives the Psychodynamic view. This book is fairly technical, but I found it very interesting to compare the views and therapies of two different therapeutic orientations for the same illness. It talks a lot about "objects" and "part objects" and "self objects", so it is not for the faint of heart. It was particularly helpful to me when I was switching from CBT to Psychodynamic therapy.

"A Primer of Transference-Focused Psychotherapy for the Borderline Patient" By Frank E. Yeomans, John F. Clarkin and Otto F. Kernberg. This book is written in question and answer style (which makes it harder to read, but perhaps easier to look up particular things?). It is a helpful book if you are wondering how therapy works, what you are supposed to be doing in therapy, what your therapist is doing (note that is is about Psychodynamic Therapy - not CBT).

"Losing and Fusing : Borderline Transitional Object and Self Relations" by Roger A. Lewin, M.D. and Clarence Schulz, M.D. This book speaks to the see-saw that many of us ride, between being afraid of being abandoned (losing), and being afraid of being too close (fusing). As we are afraid of abandonment we cling, but that puts us too close, so we proclaim our independence by distancing ourselves, which brings us back to the fear of abandonment. It talks about "holding environments" in therapy. This book presented yet another view of BPD.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by ron1953 on September 27, 2004, at 17:12:23

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

I've read lots of very good psychology books over the years but one in particular really blew me away: "Unholy Ghost: Writers on Depression" compiled by Nell Casey. I've mentioned it to many people and have yet to find anyone who read it - really surprising. Real stories by real people, all written eloquently by writers and poets. Very moving and enlightening. Also, "Darkness Visible" by William Styron (he also contributed to Unholy Ghost) is a compelling journal of depression. I HIGHLY recommend these books. If anybody out there has read either one, I would be very interested in your thoughts.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by allisonf on September 27, 2004, at 19:41:15

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by ron1953 on September 27, 2004, at 17:12:23

I'm going to try the double quotes thing...

"The Noonday Demon" by Andrew Solomon is amazing. He writes about his own experience with depression (which is unbelievably insightful) and then follows that with a rich telling of the history of depression and it's cultural/societal implications. Highly recommended!!

Also, another good one about bipolar is "Electroboy" by Andy Behrman.

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books ron1953

Posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 11:04:51

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by ron1953 on September 27, 2004, at 17:12:23

I have both of these and just reread Unholy. They are sad and moving and I'm just so relieved that someone else felt the way I feel. I want to MAKE my family read them, but of course then I'd actually have to admit to something being wrong.

I also love "Undercurrent". Marsha Manning contributed to "Unholy Ghosts" too. Her book is a journal and it is just beautiful. When I read it, I took in one of the entries to my therapist and said, "this is exactly how I feel."

Do you like these books because you felt validated?

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 11:18:21

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books ron1953, posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 11:04:51

Daisy:

Not so much validated as enlightened. Some of the stories helped me accept that my condition is chronic but not terminal. Some showed that there are depressives that have it tougher than I. I, too, would like to make some people (non-depressives) read Unholy Ghost so maybe they'd understand a little better. Thanks for the recommendation for Undercurrent - I'll go to the liberry (LOL) and check it out (pun unintentional).

Ron

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 14:21:55

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym, posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 11:18:21

Let me know if you like it. What I liked about Ghosts was that there were men and women writers. I often wonder if men and women see depression differently. Another of my favorite books (just for fun) is "Tales from a Flying Couch" and the author describes his own war with depression.

Do you have a male therapist or female? And does he/she ask you to describe how you feel beyond saying "depressed"? I find this hard...sad doesn't say enough, frustrated isn't quite right. My therapist also wants to know where the pain sits in my body, or the heaviness. Which is an interesting exercise, to try to locate it. Once it was in my left ear. Hmmm...

 

fun therapy books

Posted by badhaircut on September 28, 2004, at 17:38:27

In reply to Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Dinah on September 22, 2004, at 20:15:16

"Celebrities on the Couch: Personal Adventures of Famous People in Psychoanalysis" [no Amazon] has stories from Patty Duke and Vivian Vance and other stars about how therapy "cured" them, compiled by Lucy Freeman in 1967. It really made me completely distrust celebrities (and be skeptical of other people) when they publicly say, "Oh, I'm cured now!" It's pretty poignant: Patty Duke's problems had hardly begun when she said in this that she was All Better Now. Hard to find, but a great read.

"Children of Psychiatrists" by Thomas Maeder (1990) is a lot of fun. Are shrinks' kids crazy? Well, according to those interviewed by Maeder, their parents are. Amazon Used has this for $1.50! I've got to get it.

"What the Butler Saw", a *hilarious* 1967 play by Joe Orton, has nothing to do with butlers; it's set in a psychiatrist's office. I've thought of posting excerpts here, just for fun. One of the pdocs has an entire family committed in straightjackets and carted off to an asylum. (It's his own family, of course.)

"Cheap Psychological Tricks" by Perry Buffington PhD (1996) has 60 amusing little tips based on psych research (citations included), like, If you're going to take cuts in a long line, cut in near the very front. People near the front aren't as anxious about getting pushed back....

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by gardenergirl on September 28, 2004, at 19:33:42

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 14:21:55

Are you sure that you weren't on the phone a great deal just before that session, Daisy? ;)

just being funny....I hope.

gg

 

pain in the ear gardenergirl

Posted by daisym on September 28, 2004, at 19:51:01

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym, posted by gardenergirl on September 28, 2004, at 19:33:42

I was trying to remember if I had been talking to my mother...

My therapist thought it was hilarious. And then he said he hoped I hadn't been talking to him.


I said no, that he gave me pain elsewhere. (evil grin.)

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym

Posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 23:31:08

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books, posted by Daisym on September 28, 2004, at 14:21:55

Daisy:

I'll try to get the book soon. I read quickly and will give you my thoughts after I've finished. My shrink is a woman - old enough to be my mother. We "connected" immediately and have a lot of similar views about a lot of things. Thus, there's a lot I don't have to explain at length in order for her to understand. She is the rare psychiatrist who doesn't have a big ego. She's in the business because she really cares about people (imagine that!). No, she doesn't ask me what I'd consider stupid questions. I'm pretty good at describing how I feel and probably make it easier for both of us. We've been working as a team for over 5 years and we learn a lot from each other.

Ron

 

Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books

Posted by daisym on September 29, 2004, at 0:36:24

In reply to Re: Useful psychology and psychotherapy books Daisym, posted by ron1953 on September 28, 2004, at 23:31:08

How does the female/male dynamic work for you? I have a male therapist and we have been working together for 16 months. Given that we are working on depression and csa issues, typically the "mixed" set up is not recommended. It works for me. Of course, I think I have a pretty good therapist. He is completely invested in the relationship and I haven't seen much ego. He is willing to work with both the adult side and child sides that have emerged in therapy. It feels odd, but it seems to be working.

Does you therapist recommend books? We had a discussion today about my need to research topics. My therapist is a big fan of Kohut. I think I'll ask tomorrow about a book recommendation.

By the way...welcome to babble. I haven't seen you on the board before, are you new or returning from a break?


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