Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1122233

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Tetris increases hippocampal volume

Posted by Hugh on September 29, 2023, at 12:16:57

Reduced hippocampal volumes have been linked to depression, anxiety, insomnia, PTSD, schizophrenia.

"Reduced hippocampal volumes are probably the most frequently reported structural neuroimaging finding associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). Reduced hippocampal volumes were consistently reported in subjects affected by childhood maltreatment."

Playing the computer game Tetris on a regular basis increases hippocampal volume. At least three studies have shown that playing Tetris for 15 minutes after experiencing a traumatic event helps to prevent PTSD. And playing Tetris helps to alleviate existing cases of PTSD, depression and anxiety.

I've started playing Tetris daily at this website:

https://tetris.com/play-tetris

Studies about using Tetris to prevent PTSD:

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-09-tetris-women-traumatic-birth-large-scale.html

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-09-tetris-intrusive-memories-covid-patients.html

https://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2017-03-28-tetris-used-prevent-post-traumatic-stress-symptoms

"Playing Tetris was correlated with increases in hippocampal volume, and hippocampal increases were correlated with continued reduction of PTSD, depression and anxiety symptoms between completion of therapy and 6-month follow-up. As such, Tetris playing may ensure that a wider range of symptom improvements are maintained after therapy, through increases in hippocampal volume."

Complete article:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7828932/

 

Re: Tetris increases hippocampal volume Hugh

Posted by SLS on September 30, 2023, at 15:44:00

In reply to Tetris increases hippocampal volume, posted by Hugh on September 29, 2023, at 12:16:57

Hi, Hugh.

> "Reduced hippocampal volumes are probably the most frequently reported structural neuroimaging finding associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). Reduced hippocampal volumes were consistently reported in subjects affected by childhood maltreatment."

Yes. This is me.

My memory remains impaired, but less so as the healing process continues. In my experience, both short-term encoding and long term-recall are are affected, but short-term more so.

What do you make of the ability of Tetris to mitigate PTSD and related conditions? What's going on?

Thanks.


- Scott

 

Re: Tetris increases hippocampal volume SLS

Posted by Hugh on October 1, 2023, at 0:16:57

In reply to Re: Tetris increases hippocampal volume Hugh, posted by SLS on September 30, 2023, at 15:44:00

Hi Scott,

The following quote is from a recent article in The New York Times:

In professional studies, the psychologist Richard Haier found that regularly playing Tetris resulted in an increased thickness of the cerebral cortex. Haier's studies also demonstrated how Tetris can affect the plasticity of cortical gray matter, potentially enhancing a person's memory capacity and promoting motor and cognitive development.

Full article:

https://www.nytimes.com/2023/03/31/movies/tetris-game-boy-nintendo.html

> What do you make of the ability of Tetris to mitigate PTSD and related conditions? What's going on?
>
> Thanks.
>
>
> - Scott

 

Re: Tetris increases hippocampal volume

Posted by Hugh on October 1, 2023, at 0:37:36

In reply to Re: Tetris increases hippocampal volume SLS, posted by Hugh on October 1, 2023, at 0:16:57

Here are three of Richard Haier's studies about how Tetris affects the brain:

https://www.richardhaier.com/articles/learningtetris

In the study showing that Tetris increased cortical thickness, the test subjects played Tetris an average of 1.5 hours per week for three months.


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