Psycho-Babble Psychology Thread 661741

Shown: posts 1 to 25 of 47. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiration)

Posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 21:51:48

I know right now I'm writing this during a time I'm feeling moderately in panic mode. But is there really cures for what some of us suffer?

Will we ever feel better?

I feel like nothing appeals to me and I'm in terrible fear.

Will I live out all my years like this?

I'm shaky right now, but stable. Not completely panicing, just a bit racing (mentally). Nothing I haven't handled hundreds of times before.

For those that don't know my case:
http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/psycho/20060517/msgs/645388.html

QUESTION: Has anyone on here been cured of something they feel was uncurable at first?

Who are the success stories on this board?

Is it possible? Were you cured by treatments by a therapist or other psychology related specialist?

 

Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiration)

Posted by muffled on June 26, 2006, at 22:29:41

In reply to Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiration), posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 21:51:48

Meds AND therapy have helped me.
I needed the meds to be able to even do therapy.
Meds have helped me LOTS.
Just a matter of finding the right one.
You got alot of intense thinking going on in your head, meds help calm that down.
I've just started low dose seroquel (for anxiety-its an off-label but VERY common use). So far its been great, my mind is much quieter. I can actually think a bit.
So mebbe I'm not cured, but really, I don't think anybody on this planet could be said to be completely sane, so what IS normal? No such thing.
I just want to have some happiness and not be scared, and I am getting there, just taking me awhile.
Take care.
Muffled

 

Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio

Posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 22:36:11

In reply to Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiration), posted by muffled on June 26, 2006, at 22:29:41

Do you feel like a "different" person when you take the meds, or just more "relaxed"?

I have never taken any medication. One of my fears of it is that it basically make me "someone else."

My problem is that I just need to relax. My brain starts going 100mph.

I don't want to be "dumbed down," I just want to be "hey, relax a little." I just want my brain to be more reasonable. Less "black and white."

 

Michael83 Can psych treatments cure us?

Posted by 64bowtie on June 27, 2006, at 1:47:39

In reply to Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiration), posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 21:51:48

Michael83

Probably not, since most professionals claim there is no cure, but rather a detoxifying of the memories... They insist that you continue to gripe and grumble and gossip and complain untill you get it out of your system (which never really happens, ever)...

Instead, consider a "paradigm-shift", become your own leader, and progress toward your goals and aspirations, taking full advantage of the options available to all adults (grown ups)... Habits are not bad, even though your bad habits are slowly killing you... Find some new good habits that better match your goals and aspirations... The bad habits will fall off due to lack of attention...

"Grace" yourself with a new "paradigm"; a new life!!!

Rod

 

Re: 64bowtie

Posted by madeline on June 27, 2006, at 5:44:30

In reply to Michael83 Can psych treatments cure us?, posted by 64bowtie on June 27, 2006, at 1:47:39

> Michael83
>
...They insist that you continue to gripe and grumble and gossip and complain untill you get it out of your system (which never really happens, ever)...
>
Oh WOW! I sinmply could NOT disagree with that statement more.

There is griping and complaining (which therapy isn't) and there is getting out all of the nasties that live in your mind and soul (which therapy IS). Therapy is about looking at what happened to you in the past and how it is affecting you in the present.

A highly trained professional therapist should never let a client sit and complain, but rather insist that the client see the patterns of thought and feeling that compromise his or her quality of life at the time.

Is there a cure? YES! You learn to "hold" your past, acknowledge that it is there but that is no longer controls your life.

Therapy has worked for me, it has taken years, but I am the happiest I have ever been. I have several really good really stable relationships in my life and my mind is quiet - almost peaceful.

Could I have pulled myself out of this without help? No way. It took someone that was committed to going through this with me. I was ready to change and my therapist was ready to help.

Maddie

 

Re:

Posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 6:13:00

In reply to Re: 64bowtie, posted by madeline on June 27, 2006, at 5:44:30

I know from what I have learned in my psch class that mood disorders, and anxiety disorders are treatable with meds and/or therapy. But personality disorders are usually untreatable by meds and/or therapy.

Usually these people don't belive there is something wrong with them, so they don't seek out help anyways, unless forced to by family. Now I do believe that since personality disorders are mostly biological, that there will be a medicine eventually developed that will help, but right now there isn't much.

 

Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio

Posted by muffled on June 27, 2006, at 9:38:35

In reply to Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio, posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 22:36:11

> Do you feel like a "different" person when you take the meds, or just more "relaxed"?
>
> I have never taken any medication. One of my fears of it is that it basically make me "someone else."
>
> My problem is that I just need to relax. My brain starts going 100mph.
>
> I don't want to be "dumbed down," I just want to be "hey, relax a little." I just want my brain to be more reasonable. Less "black and white."

***I take pretty low doses, I'm sensitive to meds.
But it doesn't change who I am. I am still me, just calmer.
Took me awhile to decide too. Sometimes it takes awhile to find the right med. or combo of med. that works best. Trial and error is the only way I know.
I only at this time take 1/4 of a 25 mg. seroquel tab and 50 mg of zoloft. Its working. I feel more calm and not like i'm spinning out of control.
I'm not dumbed down, I actually can think better now!
Take care
muffled

 

Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio

Posted by llrrrpp on June 27, 2006, at 9:52:41

In reply to Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio, posted by muffled on June 27, 2006, at 9:38:35

Hi Michael,
I was feeling super-dumb about 3 months ago. I couldn't remember things, I couldn't concentrate, I couldn't sleep well, and I was weak because I hadn't been eating regularly. I had therapy for about a month, and the therapist recommended that I see a pdoc and get medicine (antidepressant + seroquel for insomnia)

Now I can sleep, I can follow conversations, and I'm not completely distracted by my anxiety. I had a lot of worries that wouldn't stop going in my head, kind of like a video loop. repeating every 15 seconds. Couldn't turn it off. And it would turn on regularly at 2 in the morning, or in stressful daily life.

I'm not sure about a cure. I feel a lot better though. And I needed the meds to be able to tolerate therapy. When you can't remember things or follow conversations, therapy is a challenge.

In the meanwhile, the therapy has made a difference. In addition to discussing things that have bothered me a long time that I've never been able to express before, I have gotten really valuable advice on how to deal with difficult social situations, and how to get my life organized.

In the medical model, recovery means that we go back to how we were, pre-disease. But with mental illness, we can never go back to where we were. If we did that, we might still be susceptible to the illness. Ideally the "cure" makes us stronger and more resilient. So that the next time life throws us a curve ball, we know what to do.

But it can't help us unless we make ourselves vulnerable- trusting strangers with your delicate brain chemistry and your innermost secret desires and terrors, and despairs. That's the hardest thing for me. I'd take a brain surgery under general anaesthesia any day!

-ll
p.s. I'm starting to have days now where I feel like the real llrrrpp, not the depressed-incapacitate-anxiety-ridden llrrrpp

 

Re: ' most professionals ' 64bowtie

Posted by gardenergirl on June 27, 2006, at 10:57:01

In reply to Michael83 Can psych treatments cure us?, posted by 64bowtie on June 27, 2006, at 1:47:39

> Probably not, since most professionals claim there is no cure, but rather a detoxifying of the memories... They insist that you continue to gripe and grumble and gossip and complain untill you get it out of your system (which never really happens, ever)...

Rod,
Here we go again...

What you describe is simply one type of therapy orientation. There are many many many many more. Are you aware of what is involved and what the "paradigm" entails in therapy orientations such as CBT, Solutions-focused therapy, Behavior therapy? I'm saying this as a fellow poster and as someone in the field...Please don't generalize your perception of therapy to all psychotherapy or therapy professionals. I'd hate to see anyone limit their treatment options unnecessarily.

Thanks,

gg

 

Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio

Posted by B2chica on June 27, 2006, at 11:16:39

In reply to Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio, posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 22:36:11

i too think a combination of both have been successful for me.
for me success has meant, being able to no longer be debilitated by my illness and memories. with the RIGHT medication and RIGHT therapist this was able to happen. i'm working full-time with no boss hovering over me waiting for me to make that one more mistake anymore, i completed my degree, and i am now pregnant and awaiting our first child. do i still have issues...yes many, and i will need to deal with them as they come up but now i know i have the tools to do it. and i have some support as well (with the therapist).

medications are tricky. the fact is the best med combination will not make you feel like someone else, however, there are infact some that made me feel 'out of it' or almost surreal. some make me sick, some tired, some i lost weight, some i gained. but finally i found a good combination that i wasn't someone else, i was me...in fact for the first time in years...i was back to me.

do you have a diagnosis?
i think first you should get some type of benzo for anxiety i think that would help tremendously, sometimes a tranquilizer is enough to calm down the racing thoughts. if not there are several other meds out there. muffled mentioned seroquel i think. this was about the only thing that was able to knock me out (i had TERRIBLE insomnia), however after about three months i really noticed cognitive blunting...this doens't happen to everyone, but it did me. i noticed i couldn't do things i normally knew how to do.
i am certainly NOT trying to scare you off trying seroquel, it might be the key to your stability. my best advice about medications is be aware of what you are feeling. you know your body better than ANY doctor. and psychiatry is unfortunately not yet a science. so your input is very important...if you notice things like side effects or mental dulling or opposite maybe a manic type behavior, it's just SO important for you and your pdoc to communicate. that is the key to proper medication. but also, give it time. these medications will not be a magic cure overnight, in fact many even take weeks to start noticing a difference.
i wish you luck michael83 and just know that there is help, i don't know if i'd call it a cure. but we can become much, much healthier.

cares
b2c

 

Re: happyflower

Posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 12:13:19

In reply to Re:, posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 6:13:00

Current thinking is that many "personality disorders" are actually characteristic ways of dealing with underlying biological problems. In other words, they're linking borderline personality disorder to mood reactivity that is biological in basis. Have you read about the physostygmine challenge? So medications that control the underlying mood disorder, along with therapy that also seeks to deal with the mood dysregulation can be very helpful.

They've also noticed that relatives of people with schizophrenia are more likely to exhibit "personality disorders" such as schizotypal or schizoid. And OCPD is so often a response to anxiety that the underlying anxiety disorder really needs to be treated.

So that personality disorders can be a response to biological disorders.

I think there's a lot of bias out there towards people with personality disorders and it might be more of a problem with frustration from professionals that don't have the proper tools than it is lack of treatability.

We're learning more every day about the brain. Maybe one day these arbitrary divisions will be softened.

 

Re:

Posted by LadyBug on June 27, 2006, at 12:17:17

In reply to Re:, posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 6:13:00

I too have lived with severe anxiety. It took meds to calm my mind and my body. And lots and lots of good therapy as well as a good therapist. I've learned different coping skills so I no longer need the meds for the anxiety. I do have an episode on ocassion, but it's more tolerable than ever before. I would go from A to Z with fear in a matter of seconds. I took meds for about 2 years and them slowly weaned off of them. Now I take them only when I don't feel I can cope with the anxiety on my own. I'm grateful for meds! I never thought I'd use them, but when I thought it was that or die, I was glad they were available to me. I only take them maybe a few times a year now depending on what's going on in my life. I'm still seeing my therapist and have been with her for over 9 years. I've grown a lot, but it's been hard. It's been worth it though! I had so much fear going on in my life before I would litterally die from it.
I hope this helps you and gives you some hope for yourself.
Don't give up trying.
LadyBug

 

Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio Michael83

Posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 12:17:26

In reply to Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiration), posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 21:51:48

A combination of medication and therapy has time and time again been proved to be more effective than either alone.

Can they be cured?

Sometimes, I think. You can learn new ways of reacting to things, and that can lessen distress. You can learn new ways of thinking about events.

But sometimes there is a chronic underlying physical cause for the problem. Those can be managed, but at this point probably not cured any more than IBS or diabetes can at this point be cured.

 

Re: 64bowtie

Posted by frida on June 27, 2006, at 12:21:39

In reply to Michael83 Can psych treatments cure us?, posted by 64bowtie on June 27, 2006, at 1:47:39

How sad...what you say.

I don't know where I'd be without my T. I would be living "dead" inside, keeping inside forever things that happened..not truly living.
How painful that you say that what happens in T is that you "gripe and grumple and gossip and complain". That's not what good T is about.

It truly feels painful to read this, because for some of us who are trying to be hopeful and to have faith that things can change if we go "through" the pain and everything instead of keeping it bottled up inside..hearing someone say "it never happens" is quite sad.

I truly don't know where I'd be without my T and I wouldn't want to live if I had to live dead inside as I was before I started T.

There is hope.

 

Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio Michael83

Posted by ElaineM on June 27, 2006, at 13:47:19

In reply to Re: Can psych treatments cure us? (need inspiratio, posted by Michael83 on June 26, 2006, at 22:36:11

> Do you feel like a "different" person when you take the meds, or just more "relaxed"?
> I have never taken any medication. One of my fears of it is that it basically make me "someone else."

I don't think that medications make you someone else really. If anything, perhaps a different version of yourself. Like part of you can function at a better level. The core-you is still you. (If that makes any sense) I never really think of the type of fear you have of meds. For me, I never wanted to try them because I was hoping they would make me a throughly different person, (I wanted them to), and didn't want to risk finding out that I'd still be only me.

> My problem is that I just need to relax. My brain starts going 100mph.


If you have alot of anxiety, I do think benzo's can help a bit with that. I've tried Risperdal and Klonopin but I didn't feel any benefits. I do however take Ativan for insomnia, and sometimes it does tone down my anxiety at little. I don't respond well (or haven't yet) to meds in general. I have many things wrong with me, but I think a huge part is loneliness and feeling empty, and I don't think medication can cure that. I guess that's where the therapy part comes in to play.

> I don't want to be "dumbed down," I just want to be "hey, relax a little." I just want my brain to be more reasonable. Less "black and white."

Seeing a pdoc would be worth a try. I think anti-anxiety meds sometimes slow me down enough to see the grey in situations, instead of only black and white. Sometimes.

And in terms of therapy, when I was seeing my old T, there were days when the connection I felt with her, the being heard, the sharing of my most intense sadness,...helped me, and lifted me up more than any bouts of meds did. I don't know, I guess its such an individual thing - a continuum of success. I'm learning there's ALOT of trial and error involved. And if a complete "cure" doesn't come (if it exists at all), "success" can be marked by little changes and the improvement they can bring. They're important too. Don't give up.

Take care, ELaine

 

Re: Dinah

Posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 14:12:49

In reply to Re: happyflower, posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 12:13:19

> Current thinking is that many "personality disorders" are actually characteristic ways of dealing with underlying biological problems.


What we were taught is that personality disorders ARE biological or physical problems in the brain and do not go away like mood and anxiety disorders. We were taught almost the exact opposite. We were taught that mood and anxiety disorders are characteristic ways of dealing with a personality disorder. But most do not have a personality disorder, who have mood and anxiety disorders.

But now they need to "discover" how to control the biological stuff. I think they would be a huge field of study to get into. Just look what they discoverd about depression, and now there are drugs to help. But from what I was taught is that the meds that are currently out there for personality disorders don't work very well.

< In other words, they're linking borderline personality disorder to mood reactivity that is biological in basis. Have you read about the physostygmine challenge?

Gotta check out about this, haven't read it.


> So medications that control the underlying mood disorder, along with therapy that also seeks to deal with the mood dysregulation can be very helpful.

The meds help the mood disorder and may help this part of a person, but the personality disorder still needs to be dealt with somehow.

> They've also noticed that relatives of people with schizophrenia are more likely to exhibit "personality disorders" such as schizotypal or schizoid. And OCPD is so often a response to anxiety that the underlying anxiety disorder really needs to be treated.

Yup, we learned this too. We were told that anxiety can bring out schizophrenia to people predisposed to the disorder. I just find this stuff so facinating! ;-)
>
> So that personality disorders can be a response to biological disorders.

I am not sure what you mean about biological disorders? Are you talking about mood and anxitey disorders? If this is what you mean, then no we didn't learn this in class. But then again it is just an intro class. What I like about our instructor is that she would go deaper into just the basic stuff in the book . I really learned a lot, but I know that I have much to learn if I deceide to study psychology. The thing that really surprised me was how much "nature" affects a person, I thought it was more "nurture", but I have changed my mind now.

> I think there's a lot of bias out there towards people with personality disorders and it might be more of a problem with frustration from professionals that don't have the proper tools than it is lack of treatability.

I think another problem too is that this information is always changing so fast that if a T doesn't keep up, they will not know the new stuff.
Just this year they have a pill for people who are suffering from PTSD to take after a tragic event to help "forget" the event. It isn't approved or anything yet. They even say it works on past tragic events, like Vietnam. This would be a HUGE thing!
I think what my instructor was commenting on is that there are meds out there for personality disorders, but they just don't work good enough or cause very bad side effects. Like the meds for schizo, it controls that, but it also can give you alzhimzers too. So they have a lot of work to do in this field. (thank goodness they stoped doing labotomies) But yet they don't do ECT much anymore when it was proven that it works very well on severely depressed people with less side effects than the common pills used to treat depression.
>
> We're learning more every day about the brain. Maybe one day these arbitrary divisions will be softened.

I hope you are right, Dinah. :-)

 

Re: happyflower

Posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 15:56:37

In reply to Re: Dinah, posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 14:12:49

I had the study bookmarked but I'm having computer problems right now. I feel like I'm posting with one hand tied behind my back.

I think this is it.

http://www.biopsychiatry.com/acetph.htm

I think it's Linehan's theory that borderline personality disorder involves quick emotional arousal and a slow return to baseline. Of course, there are probably different ways people have of compensating for that, and the deciding factor in people choosing the group of behavioral characteristics known as BPD depends more on nurture, as I read what she writes. The chronically invalidating environment.

Just like there are lots of ways that people deal with anxiety. While some might withdraw and avoid, others might try to control their environment (OCPD) to reduce the anxiety.

I think they may have linked antisocial personality disorder, or whatever it's called now, to a underfunctioning adrenaline system? Could be wrong about that. But clearly there are many ways to compensate for that. And your environment might contribute to rather you become a sociopath or a daredevil (without sociopath tendencies) or a entrepreneur (without sociopath tendencies).

And of course the developmental psychologists make a pretty good case for a biologically based environmental cause for distress in that proper neural connections weren't made at the proper time, and that therapy can compensate for that with actual biological changes. I'm not that familiar with the theory so I may be botching it.

It's been a while since I looked at any of this, and my memory may be faulty in many ways, as may my understanding be.

But I think I prefer thinking of personality disorders with a bit more hope than some clinicians do.

 

Re:

Posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 16:11:19

In reply to Re: happyflower, posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 15:56:37

FWIW, I'm not sure I agree with the assessment that people with personality disorders don't seek help because they don't think they need it. That may certainly be true for some, but by no means all.

Personality disorders are both (IMHO) the result of pain and the cause of it. I'm not sure it's true that people aren't aware of that pain and wish they could change it.

They might think that they shouldn't have to change, the world should. But isn't that really true of everyone? It's just that most people don't get told they need to change, so it doesn't come up. No one wants to hear they have to radically change to be non-personalitydisordered. I think most people would react to that with withdrawal and defensiveness.

 

personality disorders listed

Posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 16:59:24

In reply to Re:, posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 16:11:19

My book lists....

Personality disorders as -Paranoid, Schizoid, Schizotypal, Narcissistic, Hisrionic, Borderline, Antisocial, OCD, Avoident, and Dependent

mood disorders- major depressive disorder and bipolar

anxiety disorders- generalized anxiety disorder, Panic disorder, phobias,& PTSD

From what I have been taught MOST people with personality disorders are not treated at all and a high percentage are not diagnosed. I am not saying everyone, just most.

A high percentage are homeless and are in prison because of their disorder. I am not saying this to be disrespectful, it is just was I was taught and what is in my book. In my book it does say that most are not treated because they don't believe there is anything wrong with them. Most are forced into therapy either in prison or by family members that notice there is something wrong. But it is hard to treat someone who thinks there is nothing wrong with themselves. I am by no mean an expert, this is just what I was taught in school.

 

Re: Dinah

Posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 17:29:11

In reply to Re: happyflower, posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 15:56:37

Hi Dinah,

I am glad we are talking about this stuff because it is interesting to me and I hope I am not making you upset. But in my book they say Bipolar is a mood disorder, and not a personality disorder and OCD is a personality disorder.
I think many of us have some minor tendecies torwards some of these personality disorders, but a true personality disorder, you are totally unfunctionable in society. Most people don't have a true personality disorder. I think a lot of people are misdiagnosed and labeled due to insurance companies. I think the majority of us here on the boards probably have mood and anxiety disorders, but most of us don't have personality disorders. But that is just what I think.

 

Re: CBT and observable changes in the brain Dinah

Posted by 10derHeart on June 27, 2006, at 18:15:33

In reply to Re: happyflower, posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 15:56:37

>...and that therapy can compensate for that with actual biological changes.<

No, you're not botching it.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=5181

This likely isn't exactly what you are talking about, I don't think, but it's close, and what I was reminded of....and I remember when I first discovered these reports, being *thrilled* that they were studying therapy this way and that solid evidence supported what my gut had told me all along...

With what they saw in the PET scans re: CBT, I'd love to see a way found to measure the kinds of biological brain changes made during psychodynamic therapy as well (a lot harder to evaluate long term therapy, w/it's ebbs and flows, I'd guess)....and no, this isn't scientific, but I'd swear my time working hard in therapy with great therapists *has* actually altered my brain functioning outside of therapy, for the better. I don't know what else could explain my now automatic, healthy reactions to things that used to make me sick with anxiety and fear.

It's exciting stuff, IMO.

So Michael83, please take heart and keep an open mind about meds and therapy. There's so much we don't yet know or understand.....and it just could be all good! :-)

 

Re: CBT and observable changes in the brain

Posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 18:21:04

In reply to Re: CBT and observable changes in the brain Dinah, posted by 10derHeart on June 27, 2006, at 18:15:33

Again, we are talking about depression and there is proof that therapy and/or meds do help. But I am talking about personality disorders, which is different thing entirely.

 

BPD vs. BPD? happyflower

Posted by 10derHeart on June 27, 2006, at 18:28:07

In reply to Re: Dinah, posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 17:29:11

Hi HF,

I don't think Dinah included Bipolar as a personality disorder. I'm thinking maybe when she used the acronym *BPD* you thought she was referring to Bipolar....? But actually she did mean borderline personality disorder.

It wouldn't be the first time I've seen this acronym cause confusion on Babble when posters use it to mean both, very different, diagnoses.

Or I could be out to lunch and should BUTT OUT of your thread...!

hahha...just reminded me of a time with old T. (pdoc) when I'd seen someone different one time while he was away for 2 weeks. On our first session back, he starts reading the other person's notes, looking so puzzled, then asks me, "you don't have MS, do you? (meaning: multiple sclerosis)" When I looked equally confused back and said, "noooo, not as far as I know," he explained they kept using the letters *MS* and he just figured out they meant *mood swings.*

Just a dumb, silly story. sorry. Those acronyms can cause a world of confusion, though......

 

Re: personality disorders listed happyflower

Posted by Dinah on June 27, 2006, at 18:29:24

In reply to personality disorders listed, posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 16:59:24

Just a couple of notes.

By BPD I meant borderline personality disorder, not bipolar disorder.

And confusingly, there are two obsessive compulsive names. Obessive compulsive disorder is an anxiety disorder. Obsessive compulsive personality disorder is classified as an Axis II personality disorder but in the opinion of many is based in anxiety and defenses against anxiety. The movies confuse the two sometimes, throwing in bits of one and the other.

For example, "Is This as Good as It Gets" is not accurately depicting obsessive compulsive disorder (alone). The main character likely had an Axis II disorder as well.

What I'm trying to say is that a lot of thinking now is along the lines of finding biological underpinning to the Axis II disorders. For example the affective instability of borderline personality disorder having underpinnings in as yet unclassified mood disorder (and shown to have biological underpinnings by the physostigmine challenge study as well as by good old common sense).

And as a matter of fact, I've been formally (and incorrectly I think) diagnosed with one personality disorder and informally (and correctly I think) diagnosed with another. I'm certainly not ashamed of it, although my therapist and I fought for a year over the (I still think incorrect) formal diagnosis.

 

Re: BPD vs. BPD? (Dinah and 10derheart) 10derHeart

Posted by happyflower on June 27, 2006, at 18:32:08

In reply to BPD vs. BPD? happyflower, posted by 10derHeart on June 27, 2006, at 18:28:07

Yup, me mistakey! sorry dinah!
You can butt into my posts anytime you like, 10der! ;-) So how the heck are you anyways?

BPD could also mean broken penis disorder ! ;-)


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