Psycho-Babble Politics Thread 1106285

Shown: posts 44 to 68 of 112. Go back in thread:

 

Re: First Dog

Posted by sigismund on October 30, 2019, at 1:00:46

In reply to Re: First Dog sigismund, posted by beckett2 on October 29, 2019, at 14:54:49

Warren's alright, she and Bernie. I haven't followed Tulsi much at all. She surprises by saying truthful things sometimes, just like the current occupant (as they say). Did HRC ever say anything like that? I suppose so, she must have.

My father came back from the US once and we had Goldwater in the drinks fridge for a long time, before I was old enough to take a more serious interest. It did not come in a tin! It was in a glass bottle. So I cannot show you an image.

Maybe reading Shakespeare is not such a bad idea? I used to read King Lear out loud when no one was around. It felt good for my mental health. I even read The Tempest once and I remember nothing, though there is....full fathom five thy father lies under the flatfish and the squids....or is that Eliot copying him?

 

Re: First Dog sigismund

Posted by beckett2 on October 30, 2019, at 15:25:57

In reply to Re: First Dog, posted by sigismund on October 30, 2019, at 1:00:46

> Warren's alright, she and Bernie. I haven't followed Tulsi much at all. She surprises by saying truthful things sometimes, just like the current occupant (as they say). Did HRC ever say anything like that? I suppose so, she must have.
>
> My father came back from the US once and we had Goldwater in the drinks fridge for a long time, before I was old enough to take a more serious interest. It did not come in a tin! It was in a glass bottle. So I cannot show you an image.
>
> Maybe reading Shakespeare is not such a bad idea? I used to read King Lear out loud when no one was around. It felt good for my mental health. I even read The Tempest once and I remember nothing, though there is....full fathom five thy father lies under the flatfish and the squids....or is that Eliot copying him?

Oh my god. I meant King Lear, not Macbeth. King Lear is what's happening here.


 

Re: First Dog sigismund

Posted by beckett2 on October 30, 2019, at 16:05:05

In reply to Re: First Dog, posted by sigismund on October 30, 2019, at 1:00:46

> Warren's alright, she and Bernie. I haven't followed Tulsi much at all. She surprises by saying truthful things sometimes, just like the current occupant (as they say). Did HRC ever say anything like that? I suppose so, she must have.
>
> My father came back from the US once and we had Goldwater in the drinks fridge for a long time, before I was old enough to take a more serious interest. It did not come in a tin! It was in a glass bottle. So I cannot show you an image.
>
> Maybe reading Shakespeare is not such a bad idea? I used to read King Lear out loud when no one was around. It felt good for my mental health. I even read The Tempest once and I remember nothing, though there is....full fathom five thy father lies under the flatfish and the squids....or is that Eliot copying him?


'Full fathom five thy father lies;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes:
Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell
Hark! Now I hear them Ding-dong, bell.'

 

A dog's obeyed in office beckett2

Posted by sigismund on October 30, 2019, at 23:08:41

In reply to Re: First Dog sigismund, posted by beckett2 on October 30, 2019, at 15:25:57

Ooooh, King Lear! Yes yes.

If that the heavens do not their visible spirits
Send quickly down to tame these vile offenses,
It will come:
Humanity must perforce prey on itself
Like monsters of the deep.

The great thing about Lear is that it is every second speech. Shakespeare's treatment of Albany's innocence is funny and cruel.
As in
'But oh poor Gloucester, lost he his other eye?' '
'Both, my Lord, both'.

There is no good news in Lear. And some of the most moving poetry I have read.

Poor naked wretches, whereso'er you are,
That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you
From seasons such as these? Oh, I have ta'en
Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp.
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,
That thou mayst shake the superflux to them
And show the heavens more just.

I was 14 when I started on it. The world feels like it has moved on as it does at the end of the day, but there is nowhere left.

An interesting conversation on social media which took place in an opshop. The indue card is to supervise the spending of welfare recipients (Coles, Woolworths) One woman is looking through the 50c bin for something...

'Why are you doing that?'
I'm on the indue card'
'It's a good idea.'
'They'll be gassing us next.'
'It was good enough for the jews'

The charitable way of seeing this is as an example of the dry Australian sense of humour.

 

Re: First Dog

Posted by sigismund on October 30, 2019, at 23:21:15

In reply to Re: First Dog sigismund, posted by beckett2 on October 30, 2019, at 16:05:05

it wasn't.....It was from a redacted (by Pound) section of the Wasteland

Full fathom five your Bleistein lies
Under the flatfish and the squids.

Graves' disease in a dead Jew's eyes!
Where the crabs have eat the lids

 

Re: A dog's obeyed in office sigismund

Posted by Beckett2 on October 31, 2019, at 1:50:26

In reply to A dog's obeyed in office beckett2, posted by sigismund on October 30, 2019, at 23:08:41

> Ooooh, King Lear! Yes yes.
>
> If that the heavens do not their visible spirits
> Send quickly down to tame these vile offenses,
> It will come:
> Humanity must perforce prey on itself
> Like monsters of the deep.
>
> The great thing about Lear is that it is every second speech. Shakespeare's treatment of Albany's innocence is funny and cruel.
> As in
> 'But oh poor Gloucester, lost he his other eye?' '
> 'Both, my Lord, both'.
>
> There is no good news in Lear. And some of the most moving poetry I have read.
>
> Poor naked wretches, whereso'er you are,
> That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
> How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
> Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you
> From seasons such as these? Oh, I have ta'en
> Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp.
> Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,
> That thou mayst shake the superflux to them
> And show the heavens more just.
>
> I was 14 when I started on it. The world feels like it has moved on as it does at the end of the day, but there is nowhere left.
>
> An interesting conversation on social media which took place in an opshop. The indue card is to supervise the spending of welfare recipients (Coles, Woolworths) One woman is looking through the 50c bin for something...
>
> 'Why are you doing that?'
> I'm on the indue card'
> 'It's a good idea.'
> 'They'll be gassing us next.'
> 'It was good enough for the jews'
>
> The charitable way of seeing this is as an example of the dry Australian sense of humour.
>

There are refugees centers in Ireland run by a US conglomerate, Aramark, which contracts private prison management. I was listening to a podcast discussing, for instance, how the more people that fit into a center, the lower the cost per head and the greater the profit, etc. You know these places are travesties. Just the thought that Ireland had them, too. I believe California has agreed to stop private contracts. Anyways, what a dismal place the world has become. I wanted to hide my head.

What's an 'opshop'? I take it to be a thrift store (second hand store).

I've wanted to ask you. The polar vortex we experience in our midwest, is that something like the cold from melting ice being expelled from the north?

 

Re: A dog's obeyed in office

Posted by sigismund on October 31, 2019, at 2:50:42

In reply to Re: A dog's obeyed in office sigismund, posted by Beckett2 on October 31, 2019, at 1:50:26

An opshop is a thrift store, yes.

From what I have heard and imperfectly remembered, something goes wavy in the upper atmosphere causing weather patterns to persist longer (California drought, rain in the midwest, freezing cold in the centre and east). Apparently it is starting to happen in the southern hemisphere with the melting, but it is not nearly as severe.

All the privatisations have changed governments from being service providers to money streams. Room there for family members to cash in on contracts for service provision. And then there is our pathetic dependence on carrots and sticks, as if we can't bear to touch those on the receiving end of the policies.

So what about PG&E (or whatever it is). Was it once government owned? All that money paid to shareholders could have been put to use burying the power lines. Those sunny Reagan years seem long ago, the Clinton promises of economic growth too. Everybody knows the plague is coming.

 

Re: A dog's obeyed in office

Posted by sigismund on October 31, 2019, at 2:57:30

In reply to Re: A dog's obeyed in office sigismund, posted by Beckett2 on October 31, 2019, at 1:50:26

Privatisation makes sense where there can be competition. All of this institutional knowledge has been lost, wantonly destroyed.

If you want to privatise the ABC you starve it if funds, relentlessly attack it and destroy its confidence, then say it is useless and only for the elites and might as well be privatised. That looked like what Trump was doing with his cabinet appointments. Pure Murdoch.

 

Re: A dog's obeyed in office sigismund

Posted by Beckett2 on November 1, 2019, at 19:36:28

In reply to Re: A dog's obeyed in office, posted by sigismund on October 31, 2019, at 2:50:42

I think of the North Pole as unspooling all that stored cold. So it's not so bad where you are yet? You brought to my attention Tasmania and wombats. The grasses were not thriving.

https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4826297/ken-cuccinelli-accused-cruelty-policy-deport-critically-ill-immigrant-children

This clip was part of what brought me low the other day. I thought at the time he would be willing to gas the _______s. Take your pick. Then I read the comments of the women from the opshop and I felt a little cheer.

There is a meme. Stalin says 'Dark humor is like food. Not everybody gets it.' I don't know where this came from. Not as funny as the women who implicated themselves. That was true gallows humor.

From NYT 1992:

'To the Editor:

"Is Communism dead?" Mikhail S. Gorbachev asks in "No Time for Stereotypes" (Op-Ed, Feb. 24). "I think," he states, "the Stalinist model is dead and, I would add, thank God." This brings to mind a joke told me by one of my Russian teachers some years ago, which recalls with characteristic dark humor the days of the Stalin dictatorship.

In keeping with the official atheism of the Communist state, the phrase "thank God" (in Russian, "slava Bogu," literally "glory to God") was not to be used. Stalin decreed that, in its place, Soviet citizens should say, "slava Stalinu," or "thank Stalin."

The story is told of two Red Army guards walking their post before some official installation. It's late, and their tour of duty is almost over. As they pass each other marching in opposite directions, one soldier says, "Thank God, we've only got 15 minutes to go."

As they pass again, the other soldier says, "Thank Stalin, we only have 10 more minutes left."

Later the second young man remarks: "I noticed you said, 'Thank God.' What would you say if there were no God?"

After a moment, the first soldier replies: "I don't know. But I noticed you said, 'Thank Stalin.' What would you say if there were no Stalin?"

"Thank God."

 

Re: A dog's obeyed in office

Posted by Beckett2 on November 1, 2019, at 19:42:36

In reply to Re: A dog's obeyed in office, posted by sigismund on October 31, 2019, at 2:57:30

> Privatisation makes sense where there can be competition. All of this institutional knowledge has been lost, wantonly destroyed.
>
> If you want to privatise the ABC you starve it if funds, relentlessly attack it and destroy its confidence, then say it is useless and only for the elites and might as well be privatised. That looked like what Trump was doing with his cabinet appointments. Pure Murdoch.

This summer I think it was, the ABC office was raided by the police? I was so shocked! In Australia? I think it was over a source.

Yes, all of the above is happening here. The loss is not yet apparent, but we will suffer for it.

I still ponder upon Scotty agreeing to help trump and pompeo. Shortly afterwards he attended the WH. Very shabby payoff.

 

A Hard Rain

Posted by sigismund on November 2, 2019, at 20:29:45

In reply to Re: A dog's obeyed in office sigismund, posted by Beckett2 on November 1, 2019, at 19:36:28

The whole thing is depressing, but you have reason to feel proud of Mr Clay. This is the House of Reps?

The government here.......no, don't get me started, I don't know the details, but cruelty is the point.......then we have the hide to lecture the Chinese about 'our values', which will not long detain them since they take the long view. I think we paid 1 or 2 hundred million to open Christmas Island for a day and close it the next so the PM could make an announcement.

 

Re: A dog's obeyed in office

Posted by sigismund on November 2, 2019, at 20:35:45

In reply to Re: A dog's obeyed in office, posted by Beckett2 on November 1, 2019, at 19:42:36

The worse your governments are the more closely we cleave to them.
There used to be some sense of reserve, a kind of residual dignity in the way we did this.

 

How good is Australia!

Posted by sigismund on November 4, 2019, at 2:21:59

In reply to Re: A dog's obeyed in office, posted by sigismund on November 2, 2019, at 20:35:45

or ?

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/04/i-cant-believe-im-free-the-canadian-citizens-ending-the-torment-for-australias-offshore-refugees

 

Grace Slick

Posted by sigismund on November 5, 2019, at 2:01:29

In reply to How good is Australia!, posted by sigismund on November 4, 2019, at 2:21:59

Her 80th birthday was at the end of last month, and her voice in my dreams when I was 15.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3NA5a8N4iY

 

Re: How good is Australia! sigismund

Posted by beckett2 on November 7, 2019, at 19:51:32

In reply to How good is Australia!, posted by sigismund on November 4, 2019, at 2:21:59

> or ?
>
> https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/04/i-cant-believe-im-free-the-canadian-citizens-ending-the-torment-for-australias-offshore-refugees

There are cells on Manus? I thought (for some reason) there were little bungalows (not very nice bungalows, but not locked).

For a brief time I lived in Canada. British Columbia and then further inland on a farm. The people were lovely and overall the feeling was peaceful. The decreased sunlight was a problem, but that was before I knew about light therapy.

When the current administration came to power, I recall some African refugees, fearful of deportation, crossed into Canada from the midwest in winter. Do you recall this? Unfamiliar with snow, they lost fingers and toes and would have died without being taken in by a Canadian town. I wonder where the men are today.

Sometimes I think about Florida, the weirdest state in the union (no offense Floridians!) because of the southern latitude. There won't be wildfires at least.

 

Re: Grace Slick sigismund

Posted by beckett2 on November 7, 2019, at 19:59:07

In reply to Grace Slick, posted by sigismund on November 5, 2019, at 2:01:29

End of November or October? Another poor scorpio? Likely a Sagittarius. She's legend.

I know you've seen this

https://external-preview.redd.it/rvFgdZFXs5ASZthtl6S9LllE2VoY66lUKpOBMjRnrYw.jpg?auto=webp&s=28a98647c59904995f7ec6dd5d46db3ace91db58

 

Re: Grace Slick

Posted by sigismund on November 10, 2019, at 16:24:05

In reply to Re: Grace Slick sigismund, posted by beckett2 on November 7, 2019, at 19:59:07

End of October.

She was talking somewhere about the lyrics, and said that she got them mixed up with a shopping list.

Maybe she'd been reading James Joyce and Frederick Nietzche, and had some boyfriends in mind.

Her father was a banker, right? The connections come easily to her.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9fwGYBGglA
Prescient, don't you think?

 

Thoughts and Prayers

Posted by sigismund on November 10, 2019, at 22:03:42

In reply to Re: Grace Slick, posted by sigismund on November 10, 2019, at 16:24:05

There is a dog whistle for you. We don't normally say that sort of thing, especially if we are receiving coal money, or so I'd thought. Bernard Keane is centrist, but not bought and sold.

"If now isnt the 'right time' to 'talk about' climate change, when on earth is?"
BERNARD KEANE

Now is not the time to talk about the connection between climate change and the unprecedented bushfires that have taken lives and burnt out colossal swathes of NSW, said Scott Morrison and Gladys Berejiklian over the weekend. Morrison instead offered his thoughts and prayers to those affected.

Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack went further, calling any mention of climate change disgusting and the work of raving inner-city lunatics eager to prosecute an agenda.

Now is not the time. Thoughts and prayers. Accusation of running an agenda. If it all sounds familiar, its because theyre exactly the talking points used by Republicans in the wake of gun massacres in the US, designed to direct the anger about the wholly preventable and routine deaths of Americans away from the possibility of taking any action.

Climate denialism used to look like vaccine denialism the result of wilful stupidity, a willingness to resort to conspiracy theory and a conviction that youre smarter than both scientists and the sheeple who surround you.

But at a political level, climate denialism, like gun rights advocacy in the United States, isnt some psychological tic or eccentricity; it is bought and paid for by the fossil fuel industry lobbyists and donors who litter the donation returns of the Liberal and National parties.

And that denialism, and the soft corruption that funds it, has a growing body count. The victims of bushfires. The elderly who die during heatwaves. The premature deaths from smoke haze. Rural and regional Australians driven to suicide by drought and economic dislocation.

Its never time to talk about climate change for the Morrison government, even with some of the countrys biggest corporations screaming for some kind, any kind, of climate policy to provide investment certainty.

Yes, lets say it. These are preventable deaths, caused by fossil fuel industry-funded politicians here and overseas blocking climate action at every turn.

Whats particularly ironic is that the same set of politicians who deny climate change, or falsely insist its being addressed, are often the ones to be found hyping the threat of terrorism as the basis for spending billions of dollars on security theatre and systematically eroding civil liberties.

Climate change is causing far more deaths in Western countries than terrorism, much more economic damage. But those usually quick to accuse others of being soft on terrorism are themselves soft to the point of vacuum on a far more serious threat to the lives, health and prosperity of Australians.

Want to talk about politicians who ignore warnings about security threats? How many warnings have climate denialist politicians like Scott Morrison been given? Even the governments own 2016 Defence White Paper warned that climate change was a major challenge.

Instead of following NRA-style talking points, this is what Australian governments should be saying as natural disasters mount up from climate change. Its a pretty straightforward logic:

Australia is the developed economy most at risk from climate change, due to our geography and the nature of our economy
Australia thus desperately needs the world to move more rapidly to cap and begin reducing global emissions in order to keep temperature rises below 2 degrees (and hopefully 1.5 degrees) above pre-industrial levels
To do this, we need to show global leadership by moving to decarbonise an economy that is one of the developed worlds most carbon intensive. If we undertake a serious program to achieve that, we can then demand that other economies, and especially big ones like the US, China and India, do the same
It appears we cant stop serious impacts from existing temperature rises even if were successful at capping global emissions, so adaptation and resilience must be much more prominent in policymaking, across areas like drought relief, infrastructure funding and regional development
If theres no political will to achieve abatement, and enable mitigation using market mechanisms, then taxpayer funding will have to be used. Its less efficient, but the alternative of doing nothing, of staying paralysed, is not acceptable.
Anything short of this whether its Morrisons thoughts and prayers or McCormacks insults is recklessness of the same kind that would leave us unprotected against terrorists, only on a much vaster scale. And it is costing lives right now.

Not the right time? There was never a more important time to talk seriously about climate change. Each day of delay and denialism will cost more lives.

Its time that responsibility was sheeted home to those who have refused to take action.

 

The secret hand

Posted by sigismund on November 11, 2019, at 1:07:43

In reply to Thoughts and Prayers, posted by sigismund on November 10, 2019, at 22:03:42

The Greenies will be held to account for their role in these fires. As President Trump remarked after the fires at Pleasure, they will never allow the forests to be raked, or as here, burned back.

Their role in the something something something and you know the rest, deserving of what you have shown us how to deliver, will not pass without sanction.

Unless someone decent wins your election, in which case we shall change our principles.

But we gave you Rupert, right? Even though he will always be an Australian and given a state funeral here.

 

Re: The secret hand

Posted by sigismund on November 12, 2019, at 13:27:15

In reply to The secret hand, posted by sigismund on November 11, 2019, at 1:07:43

If the Greens can cause the fires why not (say) the Jews?

Maybe Australia does not wish for a more inclusive politics? Certainly Rupert doesn't. (Headline in The Australian....'The Greens Are Playing With Fire'. This reminds me of 'If The Jews should once again......'

We won't even able to do safe hazard reduction burns in the future if it becomes hotter and drier..

I'm waiting to hear that the Islamists did it.

 

Re: The secret hand sigismund

Posted by beckett2 on November 12, 2019, at 22:09:24

In reply to Re: The secret hand, posted by sigismund on November 12, 2019, at 13:27:15

> If the Greens can cause the fires why not (say) the Jews?
>
> Maybe Australia does not wish for a more inclusive politics? Certainly Rupert doesn't. (Headline in The Australian....'The Greens Are Playing With Fire'. This reminds me of 'If The Jews should once again......'
>
> We won't even able to do safe hazard reduction burns in the future if it becomes hotter and drier..
>
> I'm waiting to hear that the Islamists did it.
>
>

Are some saying the Greens are responsible, and if so, what is the argument?

We don't rake our forests, you know, nor do we allow enough logging. Because we're tree-huggers. If only we did A. B. would not happen. Not only does that give the hydrocarbon kings cover, implied is we still have control.

Oh yes. Thank your country for the gift of Murdoch that keeps on giving.

Are you guys doing alright in the midst of bushfires?

 

Re: Thoughts and Prayers sigismund

Posted by beckett2 on November 12, 2019, at 22:28:58

In reply to Thoughts and Prayers, posted by sigismund on November 10, 2019, at 22:03:42

> There is a dog whistle for you. We don't normally say that sort of thing, especially if we are receiving coal money, or so I'd thought. Bernard Keane is centrist, but not bought and sold.
>
> "If now isnt the 'right time' to 'talk about' climate change, when on earth is?"
> BERNARD KEANE
>
> Now is not the time to talk about the connection between climate change and the unprecedented bushfires that have taken lives and burnt out colossal swathes of NSW, said Scott Morrison and Gladys Berejiklian over the weekend. Morrison instead offered his thoughts and prayers to those affected.
>
> Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack went further, calling any mention of climate change disgusting and the work of raving inner-city lunatics eager to prosecute an agenda.
>
> Now is not the time. Thoughts and prayers. Accusation of running an agenda. If it all sounds familiar, its because theyre exactly the talking points used by Republicans in the wake of gun massacres in the US, designed to direct the anger about the wholly preventable and routine deaths of Americans away from the possibility of taking any action.
>
> Climate denialism used to look like vaccine denialism the result of wilful stupidity, a willingness to resort to conspiracy theory and a conviction that youre smarter than both scientists and the sheeple who surround you.
>
> But at a political level, climate denialism, like gun rights advocacy in the United States, isnt some psychological tic or eccentricity; it is bought and paid for by the fossil fuel industry lobbyists and donors who litter the donation returns of the Liberal and National parties.
>
> And that denialism, and the soft corruption that funds it, has a growing body count. The victims of bushfires. The elderly who die during heatwaves. The premature deaths from smoke haze. Rural and regional Australians driven to suicide by drought and economic dislocation.
>
> Its never time to talk about climate change for the Morrison government, even with some of the countrys biggest corporations screaming for some kind, any kind, of climate policy to provide investment certainty.
>
> Yes, lets say it. These are preventable deaths, caused by fossil fuel industry-funded politicians here and overseas blocking climate action at every turn.
>
> Whats particularly ironic is that the same set of politicians who deny climate change, or falsely insist its being addressed, are often the ones to be found hyping the threat of terrorism as the basis for spending billions of dollars on security theatre and systematically eroding civil liberties.
>
> Climate change is causing far more deaths in Western countries than terrorism, much more economic damage. But those usually quick to accuse others of being soft on terrorism are themselves soft to the point of vacuum on a far more serious threat to the lives, health and prosperity of Australians.
>
> Want to talk about politicians who ignore warnings about security threats? How many warnings have climate denialist politicians like Scott Morrison been given? Even the governments own 2016 Defence White Paper warned that climate change was a major challenge.
>
> Instead of following NRA-style talking points, this is what Australian governments should be saying as natural disasters mount up from climate change. Its a pretty straightforward logic:
>
> Australia is the developed economy most at risk from climate change, due to our geography and the nature of our economy
> Australia thus desperately needs the world to move more rapidly to cap and begin reducing global emissions in order to keep temperature rises below 2 degrees (and hopefully 1.5 degrees) above pre-industrial levels
> To do this, we need to show global leadership by moving to decarbonise an economy that is one of the developed worlds most carbon intensive. If we undertake a serious program to achieve that, we can then demand that other economies, and especially big ones like the US, China and India, do the same
> It appears we cant stop serious impacts from existing temperature rises even if were successful at capping global emissions, so adaptation and resilience must be much more prominent in policymaking, across areas like drought relief, infrastructure funding and regional development
> If theres no political will to achieve abatement, and enable mitigation using market mechanisms, then taxpayer funding will have to be used. Its less efficient, but the alternative of doing nothing, of staying paralysed, is not acceptable.
> Anything short of this whether its Morrisons thoughts and prayers or McCormacks insults is recklessness of the same kind that would leave us unprotected against terrorists, only on a much vaster scale. And it is costing lives right now.
>
> Not the right time? There was never a more important time to talk seriously about climate change. Each day of delay and denialism will cost more lives.
>
> Its time that responsibility was sheeted home to those who have refused to take action.
>
>


The same playbook here. Trump is boon for Morrison and the like. (Morrison agreed to throw one of Australia's diplomats under the bus and whatever need be to aid Barr's investigation of the investigation.)

Afterwards, Morrison received his WH invitation.

There was a recent trade agreement signed over Australian coal, wasn't there? I read something in the Guardian this month although can't recall what. If Australia went green, I'd feel heartened. The other day I read that your country achieved 50% renewable electricity for a day. Maybe a state here could do that, or a city, but the entire country onboard seems to much to ask. Or too much to imagine. The size and density of our country is unwieldy, and too many are either trump cultists or hydrocarbon enriched.

I'm feeling trump has a good chance of being elected. How could I forgive my fellow citizens?

Susan Rice, national security advisor to Obama, whatever one thinks of her, states that climate change is the number one security threat. She also believes white extremists are more dangerous and numerous than commonly seen. There was something about this near you, right? Recruitment of white guys under the guise of an exercise club? I might be misremembering this from the Guardian. I guess Australia is only 20 years behind :(

Btw, southern Australia is the rain starved area? This is counterintuitive to me, at least, being closer to the pole. But I do not understand weather.

 

Re: Thoughts and Prayers

Posted by sigismund on November 14, 2019, at 12:02:56

In reply to Re: Thoughts and Prayers sigismund, posted by beckett2 on November 12, 2019, at 22:28:58

They say that the inland of Australia in the south-eastern part (by which I don't mean the coast, but the Murray Darling basin) will be the hardest hit.

This article is good. (Where does a name like Binoy Karpmark come from?) It does not emphasise enough perhaps our historical contempt for the land. But then look at how it is with you. A more majestic land (once), equally stolen, that didn't save it from our sort. (We don't have Thanksgiving.) I have lived close to or in the bush most of my life and love it, especially now I see it differently.

And for Scomo. Thoughts and Prayers? That is an NRA talking point. Unlikely to catch on (I hope).

https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/11/14/incinerating-logic-bush-fires-and-climate-change/

 

Paul Edwards

Posted by sigismund on November 14, 2019, at 13:05:40

In reply to Re: Thoughts and Prayers, posted by sigismund on November 14, 2019, at 12:02:56

is apparently a film maker in Montana. I have never read anything of his I didn't like.

https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/11/14/peak-hubris/

 

Peak Hubris Re: Paul Edwards sigismund

Posted by beckett2 on November 14, 2019, at 16:54:20

In reply to Paul Edwards, posted by sigismund on November 14, 2019, at 13:05:40

> is apparently a film maker in Montana. I have never read anything of his I didn't like.
>
> https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/11/14/peak-hubris/

I received considerable pushback for explaining why trump was in the WH. America is a narcissistic country, America first, etc etc, and trump is narcissism incarnate. Now that was going too far!


Go forward in thread:


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Politics | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

Script revised: February 4, 2008
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-17 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.