Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1013283

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why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain

Posted by poser938 on March 17, 2012, at 0:48:53

that it is like what a windows boot up disc is to windows. i find it hard to make sense of some things i read lately, but could anyone else try and explain this?

 

Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain poser938

Posted by SLS on March 17, 2012, at 5:28:57

In reply to why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain, posted by poser938 on March 17, 2012, at 0:48:53

> that it is like what a windows boot up disc is to windows. i find it hard to make sense of some things i read lately, but could anyone else try and explain this?

Not really.

Ok.

Here's one attempt:

I don't know if ketamine "resets" the entire brain - probably not.

Perhaps ketamine "wakes up" certain dead circuits and/or "mutes" overactive ones. This recreates the healthy dynamics our genes originally coded for, at least temporarily. After this, gene activity might change, leading to a more persistent antidepressant effect. Ketamine treatment does produce an increase in BDNF.

- Scott

 

Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain

Posted by poser938 on March 17, 2012, at 8:30:02

In reply to Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain poser938, posted by SLS on March 17, 2012, at 5:28:57

but, exercise also increases BDNF, and it doesnt have that strong of a lasting effect on mood. at least not for me. it might last for a couple of hours at the most.

if the idea of it adjusting certain parts of the brain to function more like how it was designed to by our genes in the beginning is at least a bit correct, that would probably be great news for me.

 

Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain poser938

Posted by SLS on March 17, 2012, at 9:35:48

In reply to Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain, posted by poser938 on March 17, 2012, at 8:30:02

> but, exercise also increases BDNF,

That's a good point. I had thought BDNF to be a promoter of the persistence of an antidepressant effect rather than being responsible for the more immediate response.


- Scott

 

Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain

Posted by Phillipa on March 17, 2012, at 10:13:56

In reply to Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain poser938, posted by SLS on March 17, 2012, at 9:35:48

Unscientifically excercise when younger and could run would give me all kinds of energy which then allowed me to keep the pace going all day so excercise is like a jump start and then the rest is up to you to keep it going. At least that was my experience. Now late in the day evening as when done and only bike riding short burst of feeling good then when done the pain hits. And that is it. Phillipa

 

Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain poser938

Posted by Bob on March 17, 2012, at 13:45:15

In reply to why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain, posted by poser938 on March 17, 2012, at 0:48:53

> that it is like what a windows boot up disc is to windows. i find it hard to make sense of some things i read lately, but could anyone else try and explain this?


There's a lot of analogies intended to help the uninitiated masses in understanding mental illness that don't really hold once you are very familiar with the subject in question. For example, they have often referred to DBS as a pacemaker for the brain, but it really doesn't operate like a real pacemaker for the heart as we understand it.

I've noticed that since I have more carefully read and tried to understand medical studies in recent years I have come to realize that many of them are quite inconsequential, or sometimes outright wrong. One thing I see a lot of is published summaries in the news that fail to demonstrate any chain of causality, but nevertheless suggest this very thing to the casual reader. Just yesterday I saw something about a study where they followed people for 10 years near the end of their life and found that the ones who had the healthiest, most vibrant minds also were the ones who regularly challenged their minds with puzzles and novel mental tasks. They left the conclusion like that in the article but didn't even question whether the people who didn't do these mental endeavors already had the type of mind that would develop problems in the latter years. There really was nothing to suggest that the mental tasks were actually keeping the peoples' minds healthy.

Bob

 

Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain Bob

Posted by Phillipa on March 17, 2012, at 20:55:39

In reply to Re: why do they say ketamine 'resets' the brain poser938, posted by Bob on March 17, 2012, at 13:45:15

And what about those of us that since kids have hated doing puzzels? Phillipa


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