Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1011014

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Linkadge, I could use your help.

Posted by SLS on February 20, 2012, at 17:46:23

Hi Linkadge.

What parts of the brain do you know to be hyperactive in depression? I think you mentioned the nucleus accumbens once before. I would really appreciate it if you could make a list and provide citations. Right now, I am aware of the hyperactivity observed in Brodmann's Area 25 in the subgenual cingulate.

I know you are busy lately, but I could really use the help on this.

Thanks.


- Scott

 

Re: Linkadge, I could use your help.

Posted by linkadge on February 20, 2012, at 19:17:35

In reply to Linkadge, I could use your help., posted by SLS on February 20, 2012, at 17:46:23

Hmm. Some of the things that come to mind are:

Over-activation in parietal / occipital regions (a trait marker in familial depression)? Glutmate levels appear to be elevated even in non-depressed offspring.

http://users.ox.ac.uk/~psyc0288/ray_page/int_j_neuropharm.pdf

Low gaba (and hence elevated glutamate?) in the occipital lobes has also been found in other studies of depression. Gaba levels are elevated by successful SSRI treatment.

http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?Volume=161&page=368&journalID=13

Glutamate has been shown to be elevated in the prefrontal cortex of depression and bipolar disorder. In stress induced models of depression, the prefrontal cortex appears particularly sensitive.

http://www.medwire-news.md/56/71246/Depression/Glutamate_elevated_in_brains_of_mood_disorder_patients.html

The only other regions that come to mind are limbic regions and as you mention Broadmann's area 25. The area 25 serves as kind of a gateway of the feedback loop between the prefrontal regions and limbic regions. I think some studies have linked depression to reduced volume in the cingulate area. The reduced volume might cause inefficient filtering of incoming stimuli and hence over activation of both regions.

Linkadge

 

Re: Linkadge, I could use your help. Thanks, bud. (nm) linkadge

Posted by SLS on February 21, 2012, at 18:08:38

In reply to Re: Linkadge, I could use your help., posted by linkadge on February 20, 2012, at 19:17:35

 

Re: Linkadge, I could use your help.

Posted by bleauberry on February 22, 2012, at 4:24:32

In reply to Re: Linkadge, I could use your help., posted by linkadge on February 20, 2012, at 19:17:35

Very interesting. Most of the things I talk about often....inflammation, infection, toxins...have a common by-product....elevated glutamate.

> Hmm. Some of the things that come to mind are:
>
> Over-activation in parietal / occipital regions (a trait marker in familial depression)? Glutmate levels appear to be elevated even in non-depressed offspring.
>
> http://users.ox.ac.uk/~psyc0288/ray_page/int_j_neuropharm.pdf
>
> Low gaba (and hence elevated glutamate?) in the occipital lobes has also been found in other studies of depression. Gaba levels are elevated by successful SSRI treatment.
>
> http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?Volume=161&page=368&journalID=13
>
> Glutamate has been shown to be elevated in the prefrontal cortex of depression and bipolar disorder. In stress induced models of depression, the prefrontal cortex appears particularly sensitive.
>
> http://www.medwire-news.md/56/71246/Depression/Glutamate_elevated_in_brains_of_mood_disorder_patients.html
>
> The only other regions that come to mind are limbic regions and as you mention Broadmann's area 25. The area 25 serves as kind of a gateway of the feedback loop between the prefrontal regions and limbic regions. I think some studies have linked depression to reduced volume in the cingulate area. The reduced volume might cause inefficient filtering of incoming stimuli and hence over activation of both regions.
>
> Linkadge
>

 

Re: Linkadge, I could use your help.

Posted by Elanor Roosevelt on February 24, 2012, at 13:58:17

In reply to Re: Linkadge, I could use your help., posted by bleauberry on February 22, 2012, at 4:24:32

Here's another new but brief about hyperconnectivity
and depression

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/02/21/depression-is-linked-to-hyper-connectivity-of-brain-regions-a-new-study-shows0.html

 

Re: Linkadge, I could use your help. Elanor Roosevelt

Posted by SLS on February 24, 2012, at 14:33:06

In reply to Re: Linkadge, I could use your help., posted by Elanor Roosevelt on February 24, 2012, at 13:58:17

Thanks, Elanor.

:-)


- Scott


> Here's another new but brief about hyperconnectivity
> and depression
>
> http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/02/21/depression-is-linked-to-hyper-connectivity-of-brain-regions-a-new-study-shows0.html


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