Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 984894

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Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?

Posted by iforgotmypassword on May 8, 2011, at 6:00:06

I am wondering as it seems to be suggested, at least if some assumptions regarding acamprosate are correct, that decline from chronic alcohol use is due to the excitotoxic rebound. If NMDA antagonism might protect against this, would memantine potentially protect against benzo related decline?

I have never come across anything about what causes the documeneted decline from benzos (similar to alcohol it seems, in cognitive and affective dimensions). I have only come across something claiming diazepam may be less toxic than lorazepam, but I don't think I remember any reasoning given (at least in the abstract).

Lorazepam was the only thing I could use to do things on my own, and helped supress my tension and repetitive movements naturally without putting myself into a constricted "mode" (i.e. i can often relax the tension in my face, by clenching my fists, and making a stiff bee-line where I am going. Conversationally, I also have a "mode" but it isn't as functional as it maybe it seems, talking helps it to abate but because of that I often can't stop talking and not purposefully, it is more analagous to my pacing and akathisia.)

 

Re: Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?

Posted by desolationrower on May 8, 2011, at 7:26:08

In reply to Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?, posted by iforgotmypassword on May 8, 2011, at 6:00:06

could you define 'decline'?

-d/r

 

Re: Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?

Posted by iforgotmypassword on May 8, 2011, at 8:30:02

In reply to Re: Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?, posted by desolationrower on May 8, 2011, at 7:26:08

decline as reported by the multiple studies cited on the long-term effects of benzos page on wikipedia; but also assuming the long term higher risk of depression reported, and shared anecdotally sometimes here, may be a related phenomenon.

also the "lowered quality of life" reported in users of of benzos and z-drugs in another study interests me.

also considering the characteristic cluster of observations people seem to make of people after they "started drinking". i am wondering what we are seeing and what may in fact be related, what we also may be taking for granted inappropriately given the less extreme effects of benzos and lack of association with violence outside of addiction.

deterioration via alcohol is something i have depressing examples of in my family. i am cognitively in a bad state to begin with, but thankfully i am quite oddly resilient to addiction/craving processes (so much i wonder if that's in fact a symptom worth observing on its own.) tolerance on the other hand i tend to develop rapidly, and rebound can be painful.

 

Re: Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related? iforgotmypassword

Posted by Phillipa on May 8, 2011, at 13:03:21

In reply to Re: Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?, posted by iforgotmypassword on May 8, 2011, at 8:30:02

Benzos toxic? 41 years and I don't feel toxic. At one time drank with benzos and just stopped so must be reading it wrong as only connection to me is it's affinity for Gaba. Maybe different in alcholism. As for the clenching to relieve anxiety in other parts of body reminds me of relaxation excercises where you tighten muscle groups to see what tense is and then relax them and repeat with all muscle groups. Is this anything close to what you mean? Phillipa

 

Re: Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?

Posted by desolationrower on May 8, 2011, at 16:49:05

In reply to Re: Is decline caused by benzos/alcohol related?, posted by iforgotmypassword on May 8, 2011, at 8:30:02

I think you have too general a set of phenomena to make any useful conclusions, those certainly rich enough in speculatable material...

-d/r


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