Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 920238

Shown: posts 1 to 15 of 15. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Explain this

Posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 1:53:02

I've been on SSRI since the mid 90's. I've gone off several times and found myself slipping back into depression, and gone back on. I remember when I first went on them (Prozac), it was like everything became more vivid. Suddenly I could feel pleasure and think clearly and exist. I came to life!

Now I feel that way for having gone off them. My mind feels sharper and livelier. My sex drive is back. I feel connected to my body again. All kinds of pleasures are re-activated-- listening to music, looking at color, humor, sensual pleasures of food and sleep. I feel emotions much more intensely-- irritation, empathy, anger, regret, pride, a whole gamut. It's like a terrible fog has lifted. Life is vivid again.

How could it be that they once made me feel better, and now going off them makes me feel better? Is there some magic period when going on them where they lift the depression, before the emotional (and physical) blunting sets in?

Now, is this some magical period where the emotional blunting has stopped, yet the depression hasn't set in again?

I'm very confused.

 

Re: Explain this

Posted by seldomseen on October 9, 2009, at 7:08:33

In reply to Explain this, posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 1:53:02

I'm a notorious on/off taker of prozac. I experience a very similar response as you.

I've done it at least 10 times in the past 9 years, and everytime I feel better off the drug, lapse back into a depressive mood, restart and feel better for months.

I don't know why this happens either. Though I suspect a slight elevation in serotonin, or some other neurotransmitter might be all we need. As levels decline or rise we pass through the "ideal" concentration and experience relief. That, of course, is all conjecture.

Seldom.

 

Re: Explain this seldomseen

Posted by Phillipa on October 9, 2009, at 13:27:25

In reply to Re: Explain this, posted by seldomseen on October 9, 2009, at 7:08:33

I always had my own theory unscientic that you feel bad go on an ad feel worse for me always did then go off and the lack of side effects you feel better. But seems that I'm stuck on 50mg of luvox and I do feel the years of benzos I've taken have some type of effect on them as know so many people who an ad works well and when their crisis period off just wean off them. Does this make sense. You won't bother me to totally disagree and say why as I'm seriously looking for answers. It's strange. Love Phillipa

 

Perhaps the key is change.

Posted by jane d on October 9, 2009, at 19:39:23

In reply to Explain this, posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 1:53:02

Tabitha,

I haven't noticed feeling better when I discontinue a med but that could be because that usually happens after I'm already sliding downhill.

I've found some meds work temporarily when I start them (including non psych meds that have an antidepressant effect so I don't think it's just expectation). I've also noticed that while I usually get worse when I'm under a lot of stress there are times when I get better. Monthly hormonal fluctuations are the same. Usually I'm worse but sometimes better. It's made me wonder if I'm not reacting to change rather than to the specific med.

This would seem to fit with what you're experiencing too. However perhaps the ADs have just done their thing and you will be able to hold on to this feeling now without them. Have you got any non med tricks lined up to help you do that?

Jane

 

Re: Explain this Phillipa

Posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 23:40:42

In reply to Re: Explain this seldomseen, posted by Phillipa on October 9, 2009, at 13:27:25

Hi Phillipa, I don't have any answers, but when I first went on AD's I got a dramatic improvement. This happened with several different ones until a doc finally recommended I stay on them for life. I am lucky in that they really do pull me out of the pit reliably, and clear up all my dark distorted thinking, and give me a chance to create a new, less dark & distorted world view.

Then I get the poop-out, and drag along for years with mild-to-moderate depression, and a pretty big dose of anxiety. Sometimes a switch or adjustment helps, sometimes not so much. The last big boost I got was from adding thyroid hormone. That helped more dramatically than any AD switch or adjustment.

I've never tried long-term anti-anxiety meds.

 

Re: Perhaps the key is change. jane d

Posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 23:43:58

In reply to Perhaps the key is change., posted by jane d on October 9, 2009, at 19:39:23

That could be it, jane d. Maybe I just need to shake up my neurotransmitters every so often.

I do hope I can manage the more vivid emotions this go-round. My therapist thinks my coping skills are better and I now have less of the cognitive distortions that contribute to depression. She thinks it's worth a try. So maybe it will be manageable. I really *should* add regular physical exercise, but that's a tough one for me to do.

 

Re: Explain this Tabitha

Posted by delna on October 10, 2009, at 0:43:52

In reply to Re: Explain this Phillipa, posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 23:40:42

> Hi Phillipa, I don't have any answers, but when I first went on AD's I got a dramatic improvement. This happened with several different ones until a doc finally recommended I stay on them for life. I am lucky in that they really do pull me out of the pit reliably, and clear up all my dark distorted thinking, and give me a chance to create a new, less dark & distorted world view.
>
> Then I get the poop-out, and drag along for years with mild-to-moderate depression, and a pretty big dose of anxiety. Sometimes a switch or adjustment helps, sometimes not so much. The last big boost I got was from adding thyroid hormone. That helped more dramatically than any AD switch or adjustment.
>
> I've never tried long-term anti-anxiety meds.

Hi,
Sorry to butt in but you mentioned adding thyroid hormone. Do you have a deficiency that appears in blood tests. It was suggested for me (especially since I am always been tired) and my doctor said that even if it was in the normal range but towards the lower interval, he would augment. But mine was well within the limits.
What was your situation?
Thanks so much
D

 

Re: Explain this Tabitha

Posted by Phillipa on October 10, 2009, at 0:51:38

In reply to Re: Explain this Phillipa, posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 23:40:42

Tabitha starting to think no antianxiety meds makes the difference in them working or not. I wonder how much mood we create plays into it also? Phillipa

 

Re: Explain this Tabitha

Posted by delna on October 10, 2009, at 0:55:33

In reply to Explain this, posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 1:53:02

> I've been on SSRI since the mid 90's. I've gone off several times and found myself slipping back into depression, and gone back on. I remember when I first went on them (Prozac), it was like everything became more vivid. Suddenly I could feel pleasure and think clearly and exist. I came to life!
>
> Now I feel that way for having gone off them. My mind feels sharper and livelier. My sex drive is back. I feel connected to my body again. All kinds of pleasures are re-activated-- listening to music, looking at color, humor, sensual pleasures of food and sleep. I feel emotions much more intensely-- irritation, empathy, anger, regret, pride, a whole gamut. It's like a terrible fog has lifted. Life is vivid again.
>
> How could it be that they once made me feel better, and now going off them makes me feel better? Is there some magic period when going on them where they lift the depression, before the emotional (and physical) blunting sets in?
>
> Now, is this some magical period where the emotional blunting has stopped, yet the depression hasn't set in again?
>
> I'm very confused.


You know, the exact same thing happens to me! Especially when I have come off Prozac. I get a 'high' when I start and another one when I come off which lasts longer (maybe a month before symptoms come back.)
I thought it was weird too but I've always thought it was simply due to the fact that I am bipolar?!
But I like the explanation of 'change' better. It makes sense...because I have notice extreme changes in mental/physical states post stopping even an antipsychotic (am not talking of withdrawal symptoms)
TC
D

 

Re: Explain this

Posted by morganator on October 10, 2009, at 3:02:39

In reply to Explain this, posted by Tabitha on October 9, 2009, at 1:53:02

I would seriously consider staying on the antidepressant and trying to stimulate yourself in certain ways that will enable you to continue to feel alive. Enjoyable social interaction, exercise, yoga and meditation all may help.

I would not be surprised if you find yourself needing to get back on an antidepressant again. If your depression is only moderate to mild and you are still functioning, you may want to consider exhausting all natural ways to combat your depression. Again, exercise, meditation, yoga, socialization, and therapy may help. I have also read a lot of good things about St. John's Wort, specifically the Kira or Pirka brands.

 

Re: Explain this delna

Posted by Tabitha on October 10, 2009, at 14:40:47

In reply to Re: Explain this Tabitha, posted by delna on October 10, 2009, at 0:43:52

> Sorry to butt in but you mentioned adding thyroid hormone. Do you have a deficiency that appears in blood tests.

Hi Delna,
No, an endo would not treat me based on my bloodwork. My pdoc at one point gave me 25 mcg cytomel as an augment, but he did not want to continue me on it, since he was not an expert in that area. I finally went to an alternative doc who does natural hormones. He has me on Armour plus a timed-release T3 from a compounding pharmacy. If you check the about.com articles for hypothyroid, you can probably find a list of alternative docs who will treat thyroid when endo's won't. My doc was on that list, and I'd also gotten personal referral. Watch out if you do this, your bloodwork will likely freak out your normal doc or an endo since they're not used to T3 treatment, and they'll warn you of dire consequences.

 

Re: Explain this morganator

Posted by Tabitha on October 10, 2009, at 14:47:01

In reply to Re: Explain this, posted by morganator on October 10, 2009, at 3:02:39

Hi Morganator,
Good suggestions all. I've done all those things both on and off AD (well, except for St Johns Wort). Fish oil is another good one. I've never used that consistently.

 

Re: Explain this delna

Posted by Phillipa on October 10, 2009, at 19:14:37

In reply to Re: Explain this Tabitha, posted by delna on October 10, 2009, at 0:43:52

Very unstable hasimotos thyroiditis. When my problems really started. Phillipa so yes it's real

 

Re: Explain this (confused) Phillipa

Posted by delna on October 11, 2009, at 0:38:26

In reply to Re: Explain this delna, posted by Phillipa on October 10, 2009, at 19:14:37

> Very unstable hasimotos thyroiditis. When my problems really started. Phillipa so yes it's real

Phillipa,
Am confused as to what you are referring to...
Are you saying that a thyroid problem started your problems? Was it diagnosed with conventional tests and were you treated for it? Did it help?
Hope I haven't gotten the wrong end of the stick....
TC
D

 

Re: Explain this delna

Posted by Phillipa on October 11, 2009, at 19:01:20

In reply to Re: Explain this (confused) Phillipa, posted by delna on October 11, 2009, at 0:38:26

Delna yes that's when depression started before just anxiety for many many years. Yes regular thyroid testing and synthroid prescibed. Been adjusted multiple times and also recently as it doesn't work like used to. I was very stable for years. Then it the TSH shot up like a rocket and in me this creates severe anxiety. Still working on doses. Seems my thyroid is very unstable. Phillipa


This is the end of the thread.


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Medication | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, dr-bob@uchicago.edu

Script revised: October 4, 2007
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-08 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.