Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 913130

Shown: posts 4 to 28 of 44. Go back in thread:

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? Alexanderfromdenmark

Posted by Phillipa on August 20, 2009, at 12:26:28

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by Alexanderfromdenmark on August 20, 2009, at 11:54:58

Alexander I've never seen any studies of them decreasing lifespan rather increasing it if suicidal and they bring a person out of depression. Also with cardiovascular disease. Haven't seen anything to suggest bad for thyroid as endo recommends them for what thyroid meds can't fix. Now that's just any opinion. I'd love to see some studies to support this theory anyone have any. And newbie welcome to babble. Sorry you're experience on another forum was negative. Love Phillipa

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by Alexanderfromdenmark on August 20, 2009, at 12:43:30

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? Alexanderfromdenmark, posted by Phillipa on August 20, 2009, at 12:26:28

SSSri, Thyroid

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=518867

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by sam K on August 20, 2009, at 13:01:44

In reply to Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by trainspotter on August 20, 2009, at 11:03:06

if they make you feel normal again, then yea they probably increase life span. Due to less stress and neurodegeneration.

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? Alexanderfromdenmark

Posted by Phillipa on August 20, 2009, at 21:59:25

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by Alexanderfromdenmark on August 20, 2009, at 12:43:30

Alexander thanks for the link adding to my folders. Could you help me interpret as I read it to mean that paxil help and prozac didn't? Am I completely off base? Thanks Phillipa ps paxil with thyroid disease and benzos worked. Now tried prozac when first out wasn't depressed was happy and working and wasn't anxious on .25 of xanax and the prozac 20mg put me into horrible panic attacks. First day lots of energy good kind no thyroid disease on prozac aborted it after three day.

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by morganator on August 20, 2009, at 22:10:08

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by sam K on August 20, 2009, at 13:01:44

> if they make you feel normal again, then yea they probably increase life span. Due to less stress and neurodegeneration.
>

I agree..Plus, If you feel good, you may be able to counter act the possible(who knows if SSRIs are really doing this to everyone) ill effects of SSRIs.

Lithium may play a role in extending life span:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/87229.php

Anything that inhibits the MAO B thereby inhibiting the breakdown of dopamine over a lifetime may increase life span.

 

Selegiline and other pro-life antideps

Posted by trainspotter on August 21, 2009, at 10:34:08

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by Alexanderfromdenmark on August 20, 2009, at 12:43:30

Thanks for the Lithium study link, Thanks everyone for opinions, so this list is given at the bottom. The SSRIs have many flaws as you have said, chronic therapy reduces cortisol?. They (Luvox and celexa)can actually inhibit melatonin metabolism and increase it's half life and serum conc. However, SSRI therapy of course decreases melatonin to serotonin ratio(which is bad). The list of pro-life antideps
1> Selegiline (dose=?, too much can cut life short or cause serotonin syndrome or psychosis)
2> Mirtazapine (15-45mg) and Mianserin(10-90mg)
3> Melatonin supplements from 300 mcg (and possibly agomelatine- never tasted it, think it'll take a century before approval all places)
4>Cyproheptadine (8-16mg) (May not be antidepressant)
5> Lithium(dose=? even 50mg can protect neurons, bipolar people use 150-900mg generally)
6> Tianeptine (25-37.5mg)[CAUTION - WORKS REVERSE OF SSRIs and increases Serotonin uptake]
7> Antiepileptic Phenytoin (100-300mg)
8> ?? any more, SaMe? Valproate?
Anyone takes selegiline, then age(atleast roughly) and dose please and any particular good or bad effect.

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by yxibow on August 23, 2009, at 0:17:53

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by sam K on August 20, 2009, at 13:01:44

I'll put it simply, without getting into complex metaphysical and scientific arguments...

As noted, less stress... and well, to put it baldfaced, reducing the feelings of suicide. That is an obvious life extender.


-- Jay

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by bleauberry on August 23, 2009, at 17:02:40

In reply to Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by trainspotter on August 20, 2009, at 11:03:06

Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

No.

Longterm followup studies show it.
Stress is not reduced.
Suicides are not reduced.
Underlying diseases progress while misdiagnosed as depression.
New diseases/syndromes are created.
Remissions are a minority and commonly relapse within 3 years.

Actually unmedicated depression patients who just try to live as healthy as they can the remainder of their miserable lives live longer than the medicated ones.

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? bleauberry

Posted by SLS on August 23, 2009, at 18:20:39

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by bleauberry on August 23, 2009, at 17:02:40

> Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?
>
> No.
>
> Longterm followup studies show it.
> Stress is not reduced.
> Suicides are not reduced.
> Underlying diseases progress while misdiagnosed as depression.
> New diseases/syndromes are created.
> Remissions are a minority and commonly relapse within 3 years.
>
> Actually unmedicated depression patients who just try to live as healthy as they can the remainder of their miserable lives live longer than the medicated ones.


I can't believe you wrote all of these things.

I disagree with everything.

However, I have a mind that is ready to take a look at any citations you would like to provide us with.

Those are some very weighty conclusions you have come to. I would recommend that anyone who is inclined to be influenced by your post do their own research.

What turned you? Disappointment?


- Scott

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by ricker on August 23, 2009, at 18:45:38

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by bleauberry on August 23, 2009, at 17:02:40

Extending one's lifespan is only part of the treatment goal. Quality of life throughout the lifespan is most important.

For, me, no question, psychiatric medicine has been a godsend... not all the time.... but a large portion of my extended life!!!!!

Regards, Rick

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? bleauberry

Posted by morganator on August 23, 2009, at 22:28:52

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by bleauberry on August 23, 2009, at 17:02:40

Any time an antidepressant was working for me I felt much less stressed. I was able to deal with stressful events much easier. I slept much better. I worked more efficiently. I got better workouts and the benefit from the workout lasted much longer.

And the only reason why I am in bad shape at the moment is because I stopped taking my medication and did some other things to hurt myself around the same time. If I were more aware of my illness(I am bipolar), I may have not stopped medication.

If you feel good on medication, you feel less stress. It's as simple as that

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? bleauberry

Posted by yxibow on August 23, 2009, at 23:40:29

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by bleauberry on August 23, 2009, at 17:02:40

> Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?
>
> No.
>
> Longterm followup studies show it.

Which?

And if the semantics are misconstrued in this, I don't believe that antidepressants are "life extension" supplements that some people believe will make them live to 200 years old or whatever.


> Stress is not reduced.
> Suicides are not reduced.
> Underlying diseases progress while misdiagnosed as depression.
> New diseases/syndromes are created.
> Remissions are a minority and commonly relapse within 3 years.
>
> Actually unmedicated depression patients who just try to live as healthy as they can the remainder of their miserable lives live longer than the medicated ones.

I also can't believe what borders on complete lack of concern for people with depression

> Stress is not reduced.

No, depression has been commpletely unstressful to me... I feel perfectly at ease with primary and second depression. I've loved having problems, bleauberry.

"> Suicides are not reduced."

WTF ?? Of course they are in people who are suicidal who respond to medication. I've never thought about that at all.

> Underlying diseases progress while misdiagnosed as depression.

Yes, we know, Lyme, Lyme, Lyme.

In all fairness though, comorbid diseases are always going to be there. I'm quite sure I've had the common cold.

> New diseases/syndromes are created.

Side effects occur. Yes, I've had neurological consequences which are RARE to most other people and I'm not happy about that. But I'd be a lot worse without something on board.

> Remissions are a minority and commonly relapse within 3 years.

And where did this scientific paper quote come from?

There are plenty of success stories, antidepressant or therapy or both otherwise.

There's no such thing as 100% remission of anything, there's no "perfect" person.

But if you're successful with medication and continue to take it, you will likely to continue to experience this for some time to come, and that's more than 3 years.


Sorry, I'm trying to be civil, but this is really unfair to people who are fighting for their life and livelihood with depression on this board.

-- Jay

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by SLS on August 24, 2009, at 5:43:30

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? bleauberry, posted by yxibow on August 23, 2009, at 23:40:29

> there's no "perfect" person.

I beg to differ.

:-)


- Scott

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? SLS

Posted by yxibow on August 24, 2009, at 6:41:26

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by SLS on August 24, 2009, at 5:43:30

> > there's no "perfect" person.
>
> I beg to differ.
>
> :-)
>
>
> - Scott
>

Well of course we should have people love each other and call each other/us perfect! :)

I was responding to the intrinsic nature that down to the last genome, nobody is flawless.


And I don't know quite how the first sentence I wrote so perfectly fits into the movie I just watched, Sleeping Dogs Lie.

(Warning, some people may not find the irony in my sentence or the movie their taste. That is, the one by 'Bobcat' Goldthwait)

-- Jay

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by SLS on August 24, 2009, at 7:16:30

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? SLS, posted by yxibow on August 24, 2009, at 6:41:26

> > > there's no "perfect" person.


> > I beg to differ.
> >
> > :-)


> Well of course we should have people love each other and call each other/us perfect! :)


Perfect love is to love the imperfect.

I had a real problem with that when I was younger. I was always looking for the perfect woman. It wasn't until I stopped doing this that I found someone who, at the time, was perfect for me.


- Scott

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? SLS

Posted by yxibow on August 24, 2009, at 7:35:10

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by SLS on August 24, 2009, at 7:16:30

> > > > there's no "perfect" person.
>
>
> > > I beg to differ.
> > >
> > > :-)
>
>
> > Well of course we should have people love each other and call each other/us perfect! :)
>
>
> Perfect love is to love the imperfect.
>
> I had a real problem with that when I was younger. I was always looking for the perfect woman. It wasn't until I stopped doing this that I found someone who, at the time, was perfect for me.
>
>
> - Scott


Exactly, it was a short way of summarizing it with an amusing and sad and potentially not someone's taste in a movie example.


Its what I meant. And I hope someone can find the reverse in myself, because there are so many things going on.... anyhow... I don't want to go down there, its been really a bad set of symptoms lately.

-- Jay

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? yxibow

Posted by SLS on August 24, 2009, at 7:49:14

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? SLS, posted by yxibow on August 24, 2009, at 7:35:10

> I don't want to go down there, its been really a bad set of symptoms lately.
>
> -- Jay


Sorry to hear that. I hope things resolve soon.


- Scott

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? SLS

Posted by Ron Hill on August 24, 2009, at 17:15:52

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by SLS on August 24, 2009, at 5:43:30

> > there's no "perfect" person.
>
> I beg to differ.
>
> :-)
>
>
> - Scott
>

And humble too!

(-:

-- Ron

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? SLS

Posted by yxibow on August 24, 2009, at 17:18:52

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? yxibow, posted by SLS on August 24, 2009, at 7:49:14

> > I don't want to go down there, its been really a bad set of symptoms lately.
> >
> > -- Jay
>
>
> Sorry to hear that. I hope things resolve soon.
>
>
> - Scott

Thanks Scott, you're kind... well, this particularly strange and distressing set of the same 24/7 phenomenon that has been going on for almost 8 years, has been going on for 2 1/2 years, but I guess there's always chances....

-- Jay

 

Re: Do Antidepressants.....Response to All

Posted by bleauberry on August 25, 2009, at 18:09:42

In reply to Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by trainspotter on August 20, 2009, at 11:03:06

My previous response provoked a surprising uprising of emotions. That was not intended. I am sorry that happened.

As Dr Bob's disclaimer says, don't believe everything you see here. Opinions are opinions, everyone has them. Mine were not meant to cause an uprising. Mine are formed from a combination of "big picture", "scientific evidence", "anecdotal evidence", and "both sides of the fence views" all combined. I believe it is important for everyone to become as informed as possible on both sides of any debate before taking one's own side, and to strictly set aside personal emotions, biases, and preheld beliefs while gathering information.

I'm sick like you. On a day with more energy and time I would hunt for studies I saw. Do I trust those studies? Somewhat, not completely. Anywhere humans are involved, errors are inevitable. But they do become part of the "big Picture" "both sides of the fence".

Do I trust anecdotal evidence? Same as above.

Not mentioning the poster's name, I took the comments, "Lyme, lyme, lyme" very personally. That was a punch between the legs and a rather immature heartless malignant stab. You are forgiven my friend and I ask blessings on your day.

There is scientific evidence that the antidepessant Mianserin extends the life of nematodes by 30%. No other drug in hundreds did that.

There was someone on this earth who was perfect and flawless. You may have heard of JESUS?

My overall opinion remains that antidepressants can extend the lifespan of individual people on individual cases, but that when a sample population of thousands is considered, lifespan is shorter overall as a group. The reasons are involved and lengthy.

Longterm antidepressant samples have equal suicide rates as non-antidepressant samples. Studies are flawed in one way or another, interpretations can be twisted by any viewer, and I take that into account.

In the shortrun there is no doubt that the correct antidepressant for the correct person can add some years to their life. I just think that somewhere later in the majority of people's lives, those years are taken back. Alas, they were only borrowed.

 

Re: Do Antidepressants.....Response to All

Posted by Sigismund on August 25, 2009, at 20:07:37

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants.....Response to All, posted by bleauberry on August 25, 2009, at 18:09:42

We're all different here and we all have to find our own way.

I am thankful that there is such a variety of approaches represented on the boards.

There are people who I don't agree with from whom I have learned a great deal.

It is sometimes personally challenging, but I think we should welcome this.

 

Re: Do Antidepressants.....Response to All bleauberry

Posted by yxibow on August 25, 2009, at 23:15:20

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants.....Response to All, posted by bleauberry on August 25, 2009, at 18:09:42

> My previous response provoked a surprising uprising of emotions. That was not intended. I am sorry that happened.

I understand... but you're right, it was emotional.

> As Dr Bob's disclaimer says, don't believe everything you see here. Opinions are opinions, everyone has them. Mine were not meant to cause an uprising. Mine are formed from a combination of "big picture", "scientific evidence", "anecdotal evidence", and "both sides of the fence views" all combined. I believe it is important for everyone to become as informed as possible on both sides of any debate before taking one's own side, and to strictly set aside personal emotions, biases, and preheld beliefs while gathering information.

And you're entitled to your opinion, and its quite true I don't believe everything I see here -- this isn't aimed at anyone in particular but I see a lot of antipsychiatry and questionable information that doesn't examine cause and effect, and causation is not always causality.

I see surprising and unexplainable things that people believe cause them depression, which I question causation/causality.

But on the other hand I am incredibly sensitive to -certain- medications, not all, so I understand what a rare side effect and what medications can do. I am an example of that.

> I'm sick like you. On a day with more energy and time I would hunt for studies I saw. Do I trust those studies? Somewhat, not completely. Anywhere humans are involved, errors are inevitable. But they do become part of the "big Picture" "both sides of the fence".


I am rather poorly too. Its not a good state at the moment. I also have hunted for studies, although I base them on HonCode, and scientific journals that I happen to have access to or PubMed citations.

> Do I trust anecdotal evidence? Same as above.

No comment there... although I can theorize from a real peer reviewed journal that there is perhaps promise from a case study (like 3 people) but that doesn't provide enough information base.


> Not mentioning the poster's name, I took the comments, "Lyme, lyme, lyme" very personally. That was a punch between the legs and a rather immature heartless malignant stab. You are forgiven my friend and I ask blessings on your day.

I'm sorry about that, and I apologize. Its very hard sometimes on here where this is the MEDICINE board and not the alternative board and I see certain things stated over and over again....

....about alternative theories that include dangerous practices of things such as chelation which should only be done in medical emergencies

..... and contrary to standard psychiatric practice advice about how first one should always be checked for Lyme disease.

And I cracked. I'm sorry to offend you. I am strangled every time I post on here by civility rules. Admittedly it was coarse... I'm trying to figure a way I could have said it civilly and yet strangling what I really wanted to say which is that I think is..... well.... can't say it on here.

I don't pretend to be above anyone's views and I try not to "practice medicine without a license" but I guess without saying anything more, I believe in things that come from relative to strongly mainstream medical journals. That's just my view.

Again, I apologize, but we obviously greatly disagree.


(I admit... I had a lot of tests done because I have a disorder category and symptoms that besides two people very vaguely have mentioned, nobody else has such a condition and I still wonder about other tests... dont get me wrong.)


It has gripped me for 8 years and robbed me of what I think most people take for granted of average sensory properties in life (visual amplifications and distortions that I think the average person would find rather scary if they could see through my psychiatric eyes) so maybe I am also bitter.


> There is scientific evidence that the antidepessant Mianserin extends the life of nematodes by 30%. No other drug in hundreds did that.

I don't know about that... I haven't seen that study, and I'm not a nematode... its hard to transfer things from other species to humans... sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn't.

Mianserin also has some detractions, and it is why mirtazapine is used these days... and I also see the same Wikipedia study that you mentioned, in Nature.

Yes, Nature is relatively mainstream, but that doesn't mean its absolute. But, so, its interesting, thanks..


I hope some day that the... and I'm probably going to offend someone, I can't help it... mm... ugh... again strangled by "being civil"... anti-scientific religious circle will allow us to use stem cells and other contentious non-living entities to expand what is the forefront of what could help millions of people.

> There was someone on this earth who was perfect and flawless. You may have heard of JESUS?

It is impossible to scientifically debate the existence of someones god.

If you believe Jesus was perfect and flawless, then so be it. I can't refute this.


But I am agnostic, and I am Jewish. I am basically not religious, my scientific background makes me agnostic, which means I may believe at times that e.g. perhaps a higher power was looking out for me when I almost went over a cliff. I am strongly culturally though.


Religion helps some people explain the things that cannot be explained otherwise scientifically.

And that's fine... in my mind... and here comes the civility again... as long as it is a completely personal belief. This is the same belief I have that people should have basic human rights and be able to do things in life that as best as possible don't infringe on others. As is said, it is hard to please everyone all the time.

I have a strict view of separation of church and state and to an extent the view of the founding Deists of the US. So I cannot countenance proselytizing, infringing on others' human rights (e.g. domestic partnerships, marriage to all, the right for women to have abortions in just about all circumstances, civil liberties and rights to all [e.g. extreme unnamed religion practices of flogging women, not allowing them to drive, putting veils on them, and flying airplanes into buildings occupied by people]).


I could go on about how religion has become the chief ruler of democracy but I wont because again, I am strangled by "being civil".

But, and this is going into the religious area, if I recall one is here, and I just can't get into such debates


> My overall opinion remains that antidepressants can extend the lifespan of individual people on individual cases, but that when a sample population of thousands is considered, lifespan is shorter overall as a group. The reasons are involved and lengthy.

Actually I believe when a population of thousands are considered its just the same and more valid of a study than 10 people, just like the required amount of people to be in studies for FDA approved medication. But we can disagree.. that's fine.


> Longterm antidepressant samples have equal suicide rates as non-antidepressant samples. Studies are flawed in one way or another, interpretations can be twisted by any viewer, and I take that into account.

I agree with the first part, because I believe that all the warnings placed on EVERY antidepressant available in the pharmacy back to the 1950s are put there for CYA (cover your tushy) purposes.

Sure, a sample of people could react in "rare" ways (as a prescribing information notes... 1/1000, 1/10000 or less typically) and have worsened problems that lead to suicide.

But people who are depressed (and the standard gamut of listings of signs, we don't have to describe it all, I'm sure we know this) have a potential to be suicidal in the first place and the medicine may have zero to do with it.


> In the shortrun there is no doubt that the correct antidepressant for the correct person can add some years to their life. I just think that somewhere later in the majority of people's lives, those years are taken back. Alas, they were only borrowed.


I am allowed to disagree with this. There is no guarantees in life, and I have sorely learned this in the past years with an intense disorder I cannot believe is even in the class or state of conditions I have had before and have conquered or gotten around them in a fairly functional manner.


So I can't see how borrowing or taking has validity. It doesn't make sense to me. If you stay on medication, however imperfect it is, and yes, even for me, especially right now, very imperfect, that allows you greater functionality than otherwise, use what you have.

Unfortunately, I am really down about "using what I have".


Yes, I have talked alot about me and perhaps not addressed you enough, but its not often I really bare my chest and say what is bothering me not because I dont think people wouldnt be sympathetic and empathic but because they extremely complex things that vex me as much as they have vexed some people that have heard or evaluated my case. Considering for myself, that it happened literally overnight like a snap.


So I will try not to be uncivil and not to offend you. Perhaps it is just better not to debate how I feel strongly. Perhaps we just but heads. I don't know anyway other to put it.


Take my apology, this is not religious, or otherwise, it is just face value to someone who has felt offended and I am sorry for that.

-- tidings

Jay


 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? bleauberry

Posted by SLS on August 26, 2009, at 6:19:37

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?, posted by bleauberry on August 23, 2009, at 17:02:40

Hi Bleuberry.

You show a lot of courage to post your views, and even more courage to continue to post in the face of opposition. However, you made statements in a manner that would lead a reasonable person to believe they were fact. It is your privilege to post in any manner you wish. I don't doubt that you have a sense of duty to inform people of things you believe will harm them. In kind, I have the privilege, and perhaps the duty, to challenge your opinions, especially since they are stated as fact rather than being qualified as opinions.

The onus is really on you to provide supporting evidence for your statements. I don't know if I will continue posting along this thread about your contentions, but if I do, it is not up to me to disprove anything you have to say. However, I will want to evaluate any supporting evidence you have for your views, and then reevaluate my own belief system.

I believe that the consequences of people acting upon your statements as if they were fact can lead to deleterious behavior, and perhaps shorten their life. That major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder are associated with cardiovascular disease and a shortened life-span is but one fact that I feel you must take into consideration.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071015131515.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19592517?ordinalpos=5&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2976950

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19689508?ordinalpos=10&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16520433?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=3&log$=relatedarticles&logdbfrom=pubmed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19566773?ordinalpos=6&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum


************************************************


> > Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?
> >
> > No.
> >
> > Longterm followup studies show it.
> > Stress is not reduced.
> > Suicides are not reduced.
> > Underlying diseases progress while misdiagnosed as depression.
> > New diseases/syndromes are created.
> > Remissions are a minority and commonly relapse within 3 years.
> >
> > Actually unmedicated depression patients who just try to live as healthy as they can the remainder of their miserable lives live longer than the medicated ones.
>
>
> I can't believe you wrote all of these things.
>
> I disagree with everything.
>
> However, I have a mind that is ready to take a look at any citations you would like to provide us with.
>
> Those are some very weighty conclusions you have come to. I would recommend that anyone who is inclined to be influenced by your post do their own research.
>
> What turned you? Disappointment?
>
>
> - Scott

 

Hey no fights!

Posted by trainspotter on August 26, 2009, at 10:34:14

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? bleauberry, posted by SLS on August 26, 2009, at 6:19:37

Once again it's turning into who can insult who! Hey buster no fighting, it increases stress and reduces life, I have other posts about anxiety and panic and many people take this as a supportive group.

 

Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan?

Posted by swan600 on August 26, 2009, at 13:48:34

In reply to Re: Do Antidepressants extend lifespan? bleauberry, posted by SLS on August 26, 2009, at 6:19:37

I read a study that sais it shortens the life span just like a person who smokes.


Go forward in thread:


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Medication | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

Script revised: February 4, 2008
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-17 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.