Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 397165

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generic drugs are not tested enough..pts suffer

Posted by stargazer2 on October 31, 2007, at 8:31:50

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by CaveMan on October 30, 2007, at 18:15:18

This issue has been brought to the FDA's attention becasue of so many complaints. They are looking into it. Many people have said it is not working as well as Buproprion did.

This happened with Nardil as well but since there are not as many people on Nardil, so I think it has fallen on deaf ears.

The pharmaceutical companies have gottn away from testing the generic drugs since the generics supposedly contain the same active ingredients as the brand name. But what is not the same are some of the 'non-active" ingredients which affect thing like the absorption time, etc.

It's not happening just with psych meds either. People on BP meds are finding their BP is not being controlled with some of the generics.

It's bad enough when it happens to one generic but many brands have multiple generics.

How many people out there are taking generics and suffering from them and don't even know it?

It sounds like a major blunder on the part of the FDA....They don't have enough staff as it is to test all the new 'brand' name meds, let alone,all of the generic forms of the brand.

Wellbutrin is the brand, Bupropprion is the generic, so what is Budeprion, the generic of the generic? It's mind boggling and the impact of all of this is more patients who have been stabalized being destabalized. A real health care crisis if you ask me.

Stargazer

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by pandawat on November 29, 2007, at 11:08:26

In reply to Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by Daniel2000 on September 30, 2004, at 7:41:28

I've been on Wellbutrin for years, and just tried Budeprion this past week. My opinion is that Budeprion sucks elephant *#@*!@#!!! Whoever tried to pass it off as Wellbutrin should be shot. I've never been this close to suicide in my life. It's as if I just stopped taking Wellbutrin cold turkey. Also stopped smoking a long time ago, but am craving cigarettes again now.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by doylethug on December 5, 2007, at 17:52:05

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by Dubster on September 5, 2005, at 21:28:05

I recently took budeprion and experieced nausea for about 2 weeks. Then the prescription ran out and now I'm on buprion XL. When I take them in the morning I feel really angry and confused. Has anyone experienced this and if so did it subside?

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by sdworaczyk on December 6, 2007, at 8:52:06

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by Dubster on September 5, 2005, at 21:28:05

My son and I started having boughts of rage or being set off by the smallest thing and castrophizing the situation on the name brand Wellbutrin XL after a few months, (however I had such horrible affects on the generic I wanted to just die for the brief 2 weeks I took it). We are both still taking the Wellbutrin XL, however our doctor added 10mg of Lexapro daily to it and we have both had excellent results, I feel better than I have in years with the added Lexapro. I hope this helps.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by 30years on December 28, 2007, at 14:24:08

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by sdworaczyk on December 6, 2007, at 8:52:06

I honestly don't understand the complaints between the brand-name and the generics. I've been on anti-depressents for the worst kind of depression for about 30 years now and have never noticed any difference going from brand-name to generics. Generics are the identical chemical composition as the brand-names (such as Wellbutrin).

The New England Journal of Medicine reports that "Generic-drug manufacturers must establish bioequivalence to the active ingredients of the original drug and demonstrate adherence to FDA-approved manufacturing processes."

I've been switched from Wellbutrin XL to Budeprion XL and now to Bupropion HCL--all contiain the chemical makeup of "bupropion HCL." I've never had new side effects or noticed any difference in efficaciousness. Same is true for all the generics I've been on the last 30 years.

The ONLY thing that might make a difference is if the XL (extended release) process is different in the differing generics versus the brand-name drug--i.e., if the extended release of the drug is somehow not equivalent over time. Seems the FDA oversight of the manufacturing process should also eliminate any problems there as well.

Perhaps Dr-Bob has some insight.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by mom2 on January 12, 2008, at 15:34:15

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin Arlene223, posted by kingcolon on April 22, 2007, at 12:51:23

I got my Wellbutrin XL filled yesterday, and also was switched to the generic Budeprion XL without notice from the pharmacy. I am curious if there is anyone that has taken the Budeprion XL without any problems? I am nervous about taking a generic for depression when the brand works so well. Thanks!

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by Mclscotts on January 12, 2008, at 15:41:18

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by mom2 on January 12, 2008, at 15:34:15

I HAVE USED BUDEPRION XL FOR ALMOST A YEAR NOW AND I HAVE HAD NO PROBLEMS WITH IT, I TRIED THE WELLBUTRIN XL NAME BRAND FOR A MONTH AND THEN SWITCHED TO THE GENERIC. I REALLY DON'T SEE ANY DIFFERENCE AT ALL AND I DON'T UNDERSTAND WHY SO MANY PEOPLE ARE COMPLAINING ABOUT IT.

> I got my Wellbutrin XL filled yesterday, and also was switched to the generic Budeprion XL without notice from the pharmacy. I am curious if there is anyone that has taken the Budeprion XL without any problems? I am nervous about taking a generic for depression when the brand works so well. Thanks!

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by slogan on February 14, 2008, at 23:02:33

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by Mclscotts on January 12, 2008, at 15:41:18

i just started taking Budeprion 2 weeks ago, i've had headaches, been dizzy, no sex drive and i feel like i cant breathe. i have never been on wellbutrin and wonder if its worth even giving it a try

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by Ladybug56 on February 15, 2008, at 10:53:31

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by slogan on February 14, 2008, at 23:02:33

> i just started taking Budeprion 2 weeks ago, i've had headaches, been dizzy, no sex drive and i feel like i cant breathe. i have never been on wellbutrin and wonder if its worth even giving it a try

There is a difference between the brand name and the generic. With the brand name Wellbutrin I felt no difference in my libido, which I had on other medications, and it really calmed my anxiety and depression. When I had to switch to the generic due to insurance I could definately tell the difference. If your insurance pays for it, or your co-payment doesn't triple like mine did, you should try to go back on the name brand, at least long enough to see how it really works for you. But then again everybody reacts to medications differently, thats apparent by reading some of these posts. Some people say they can tell no difference at all, others really suffer from the change. Good luck!

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin mom2

Posted by 30years on February 18, 2008, at 3:51:40

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by mom2 on January 12, 2008, at 15:34:15

> I got my Wellbutrin XL filled yesterday, and
> also was switched to the generic Budeprion XL
> without notice from the pharmacy. I am curious
> if there is anyone that has taken the Budeprion
> XL without any problems? I am nervous about
> taking a generic for depression when the brand
> works so well. Thanks!

I've never noticed any difference whatsoever between the brand and the generics over the 30 years I've been taking medication (and that's about all of them--I'm treatment resistant). They are chemically identical, which means there is no way your body can tell the difference (as long as the generic is identical in all aspects; for example: immediate release, sustained release (SR), extended release (XR or XL), etc.)

My guess is that for those that notice a difference, it is either psychological or symptoms that would have occurred regardless. Aspirin is aspirin, regardless of what brand you buy.

 

Re: generic drugs are not tested enough..pts suffer stargazer2

Posted by 30years on February 18, 2008, at 4:00:14

In reply to generic drugs are not tested enough..pts suffer, posted by stargazer2 on October 31, 2007, at 8:31:50

> Wellbutrin is the brand, Bupropprion is the generic, so what is Budeprion, the generic of the generic? It's mind boggling and the impact of all of this is more patients who have been stabalized being destabalized. A real health care crisis if you ask me.

Budeprion is one generic company's "brand name" for the generic buproprion--the prescription label will always include both the "name" given by any company, generic or not, as well as the generic (chemical) name. The same is true of Budeprion, but it's still just another generic.

There was a "generics scare" widely reported in the press several years ago. Turned out after the FDA investigated, the generics were found to be just fine.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin 30years

Posted by kingcolon on February 18, 2008, at 11:00:24

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin mom2, posted by 30years on February 18, 2008, at 3:51:40

> > I got my Wellbutrin XL filled yesterday, and
> > also was switched to the generic Budeprion XL
> > without notice from the pharmacy. I am curious
> > if there is anyone that has taken the Budeprion
> > XL without any problems? I am nervous about
> > taking a generic for depression when the brand
> > works so well. Thanks!
>
> I've never noticed any difference whatsoever between the brand and the generics over the 30 years I've been taking medication (and that's about all of them--I'm treatment resistant). They are chemically identical, which means there is no way your body can tell the difference (as long as the generic is identical in all aspects; for example: immediate release, sustained release (SR), extended release (XR or XL), etc.)
>
> My guess is that for those that notice a difference, it is either psychological or symptoms that would have occurred regardless. Aspirin is aspirin, regardless of what brand you buy.

My feeling is that the question is not whether the chemical bupropion is identical in the generics vs. the brands, but whether the release formulation is identical. Even if a generic says XL or SR, I believe the FDA does not monitor the composition of the release component. Therefore, a generic might release differently--eg, more erratically, with poorer absorption, leading to lower bupropion blood levels. Some sustained release formulations have been known to pass through the GI tract intact and emerge as whole pills!

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by pollyjean on February 18, 2008, at 18:06:03

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin mom2, posted by 30years on February 18, 2008, at 3:51:40

>> I've never noticed any difference whatsoever between the brand and the generics over the 30 years
>> I've been taking medication (and that's about all of them--I'm treatment resistant). They are chemically
>> identical, which means there is no way your body can tell the difference (as long as the generic
>> is identical in all aspects; for example: immediate release, sustained release (SR), extended
>> release (XR or XL), etc.)
>>
>> My guess is that for those that notice a difference, it is either psychological or symptoms that
>> would have occurred regardless. Aspirin is aspirin, regardless of what brand you buy.

That's not entirely true. Generics are supposed to be identical to brand name with respect to their "active" ingredients, but their "inactive" ingredients can differ (which is why generic pills often look different than their brand name analogs). The inactive ingredients are things other than the drug itself, like fillers, coloring, etc, and so differences aren't supposed to affect the efficacy of the drug. However, sometimes switching between generic and brand name can result in different symptoms either because your body has an allergy to one of the inactives, or because your body is just used to the combination of the drug with specific inactives.

So it certainly isn't supposed to make any difference whether you take generic or brand, and generic is a lot cheaper. But if you have a problem on generic it's worth trying the brand name (if you can afford it or get insurance to cover it).

Judging from message boards like this, it seems to me that there have been a lot more negative responses to generic Wellbutrin than there usually are to generics, which would suggest that the generic companies are either using inactive ingredients that are problematic or they aren't being very consistent with their quality/strength/etc. (They have to meet strict FDA quality conditions to get certified as a generic, but that doesn't mean they don't slack off on quality once they've got approval).

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by grinch on February 18, 2008, at 19:05:08

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by pollyjean on February 18, 2008, at 18:06:03

After a month on Budeprion XL generic I switched back to the brand. I noticed a change while on the generic. I have no preconceived ideas about the ineffectiveness of generics vs brands because of my many years working as a pharmacy clerk. I don't know how many times I heard and said the generic is just as good as the brand. Overall, I really do believe that generics are the same. In this case I noticed a difference in my level of agitation. However, I do feel some level of agitation on the brand as well and even though I am back on the brand my prescriber added 5mg of Lexapro to the Wellbutrin and that combination has worked very well for me for the past 10 months. I might try the generic again due to cost.

 

re: Generics et alia

Posted by yxibow on February 22, 2008, at 2:38:29

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by pollyjean on February 18, 2008, at 18:06:03

There are few compounds that are sensitive enough for individuals generally to detect between generic and patented. Also there are a few compounds that are required to be especially monitored.

There are other issues -- there can be a placebo effect when one knows they're using generic medication. This is not entirely baseless.

Some generics, little known are actually made by a subsidiary of their own original patented company. Gabapentin (Greenstone brand) is made by Greenstone, a generic subsidiary of Pfizer, the original maker of Neurontin.

The most important thing with generics if one really finds they actually have sustained differences is attempting to insist on obtaining the same generic brand from the pharmacy. Some pharmacies may change suppliers from time to time which is based on their own cost issues. This may result in having to fill it at another pharmacy if one needs this route.

Finally, generally things like propranolol, diazepam, and the like have been generic for years, used generically in hospitals, and it is far expensive to get the few remaining "originals" of Xanax, Klonopin, and Valium.


Patent regulations and years are different in Canada and there is already generic Seroquel (Cipla) in Canada. There is also a provision in the US for "hostile" or non-notifying of application for generic. Teva is currently trying to apply for generic Seroquel, which may cost them patent infringement fees but could come to market. I'm not a lawyer so I don't quite understand these provisions but these things have happened apparently.


Just a view

-- Jay

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by grey on February 26, 2008, at 19:57:24

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin mom2, posted by 30years on February 18, 2008, at 3:51:40

> I've never noticed any difference whatsoever between the brand and the generics over the 30 years I've been taking medication (and that's about all of them--I'm treatment resistant). They are chemically identical, which means there is no way your body can tell the difference (as long as the generic is identical in all aspects; for example: immediate release, sustained release (SR), extended release (XR or XL), etc.)<

> My guess is that for those that notice a difference, it is either psychological or symptoms that would have occurred regardless. Aspirin is aspirin, regardless of what brand you buy.<

According to the FDA generics do not have to be "identical" in all aspects, such as XL = XL. They only have to be within a 20% range of the name brand sustainable level. That can be higher or lower. The same is true for all different type releases, i.e. XL, SR, ER. For some people that 20% different can be the difference in a drug working or not. But then, all generics are not the same. Hypothetically, while Bupropion XL might be only a 5% sustainable difference Budeprion XL might be an 8% sustainable difference.

A friend of mine who is a neurologist told me that even a 1% difference can affect how someone responds to a drug. He also said that he has seen someone not tolerate a 1st level generic like Bupropion XL (ANCHEN) but can tolerate a 2nd level generic such as Budeprion XL (TEVA)with no problem. On top of that it will also depend what other meds they are on.

The bottom line is that you may have to try several brands of generics to find one that works for you. Most drugs have several generic manufacturers. You might also have to go back to Wellbutrin XL.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin grey

Posted by yxibow on February 27, 2008, at 0:21:34

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by grey on February 26, 2008, at 19:57:24

> > I've never noticed any difference whatsoever between the brand and the generics over the 30 years I've been taking medication (and that's about all of them--I'm treatment resistant). They are chemically identical, which means there is no way your body can tell the difference (as long as the generic is identical in all aspects; for example: immediate release, sustained release (SR), extended release (XR or XL), etc.)<
>
> > My guess is that for those that notice a difference, it is either psychological or symptoms that would have occurred regardless. Aspirin is aspirin, regardless of what brand you buy.<
>
> According to the FDA generics do not have to be "identical" in all aspects, such as XL = XL. They only have to be within a 20% range of the name brand sustainable level. That can be higher or lower. The same is true for all different type releases, i.e. XL, SR, ER.


Releases -- is the important word. Once someone is on a stabilized set of medication, it is more of a difference of plasma level. They would have already reached that stage so tolerance of 80-120% under the AUC curve should not be an issue. Personally, some of the releases of Wellbutrin I believe are patent extensions, such as XL... others like ER are important because they have demonstrated a lower seizure threshold. But that's just my 2c.

For some people that 20% different can be the difference in a drug working or not. But then, all generics are not the same. Hypothetically, while Bupropion XL might be only a 5% sustainable difference Budeprion XL might be an 8% sustainable difference.
>
> A friend of mine who is a neurologist told me that even a 1% difference can affect how someone responds to a drug. He also said that he has seen someone not tolerate a 1st level generic like Bupropion XL (ANCHEN) but can tolerate a 2nd level generic such as Budeprion XL (TEVA)with no problem. On top of that it will also depend what other meds they are on.


That sounds like an extremely isolated case, and may have to do with more than binding. Don't forget, this is a secondary knowledge of a patient of a neurologist, not a psychiatrist. The individual could have much other different problems.

Not even some of the -brand- name manufacturers have stamped every pill of a batch will be within 1% tolerance of itself although they should generally.

There are only a few important compounds where there are issues of safety and mortality and are monitored to the Nth degree or are only "original". There is a small list of these types of drugs that the FDA does scrutinize differently, including Synthroid and agents that could be more life threatening.

> The bottom line is that you may have to try several brands of generics to find one that works for you. Most drugs have several generic manufacturers. You might also have to go back to Wellbutrin XL.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by heather66 on June 6, 2008, at 13:26:34

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin grey, posted by yxibow on February 27, 2008, at 0:21:34

I just received Bupropion HCL XL without notice from pharmacy when previous refills were Budeprion XL. The pharmacy told me this is a difference in manufacturer but medication is same. I am wondering if I will notice a difference. This new pill is round white circle marked with A 102. I like that it is smaller than the long yellow pill.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by GregS on June 8, 2008, at 0:48:54

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin grey, posted by yxibow on February 27, 2008, at 0:21:34

Whatever you take(generic or brand names), there is a small chance that it may not be quite right and if I found that there is a major change in how I was feeling I would report the results to my doctor. Opinions between physicians still differ but there is strong evidence to suggest that most doctors will try generics first. I've talked to a fairly large number of physicians and pharmacists who would agree that medications like bupropion would be safe to try in generic form.

Over 30 years ago, it was found that forms of digitalis(a heart medicine) and thyroid hormone were more consistent in the branded form rather than the generic form. Another study more recently reported that the generic form of a certain hormone was more consistent than the brand name.

There is very little testing that goes on after the medication is produced and it is really quality control of the process and the quality of the initial quality of the ingredients that are more important manufactured medications like those that are measured in mg.or gm.. Buproprion falls in to this category.

There are a few important exceptions. Medications that are measured in units, frequently written
as I.U. such as insulin, heparin and a few others are not measured in weights but in units of biological activity. Testing of lots after the production is essential to quality control.

The second exception that has been already mentioned is time release medication. Although a generic would have the same amount of medication in it, it might not be released at the same rate as the brand name. The difference is likely to be negligible but possible. So a switch from a generic sustained release to a brand name or visa versa may be noticed.

This whole phenomenon doesn't mean that one is better than the other; it just means that they are slightly different. If a generic is available, myself, would try the generic and see if it agrees with me. The drug companies make enough money anyway, and I don't have money to throw away. If on a generic delayed or sustained release or long acting medication I would stay on the same generic. If the pill looks different I might ask a physician about the advisability of taking the new pill or capsule. If you disease is poorly controlled, you and your physician may want to keep everything exactly the same.

Another consideration is "counterfeit " drug. A "counterfeit " drug is a drug that look like the real drug (whether it be generic or brand name) but has less or none of the actual medication in them. The concern about such drugs may be more of a concern lately (and this is only my opinion) due decreased funding of the FDA are more of the government's money is being spent on the war effort. The manufacturing, distributing and dispensing of such drug is heinous and criminal. When medications can cost up to $1000.00 and more a dose the to motive to profit is great. Too often these problem go unpunished. Ask your doctor if anything seemes to be wrong.

Finally there are tainted medications. By tainted I mean that the medicine may not be what they say it is but it may be toxic to the point that it may cause illness or death. Here again the FDA does not have the teeth to control this problem and distributors buy medication from producers that are substandard. Here to motivation for a quick profit is high and the ability to protect you or me is left on primarily our shoulders. One lesson is clear any company has no business buying any medications from China.

There is no government agency or private entities that has the ability to protect us from counterfeit or tainted medications branded or generic. As they say, let the buyer beware. It is up to the patient to inform the doctor of any significant problems.

So those are the exceptions. Totally unrelated to the quality of the medicine is the response of you and me to what we take. First if the tablet or capsule looks different, tastes different, or has a different name on the bottle relatively 30% of those taking the new form of the drug will report a difference even when there isn't any difference to be found by legitimate scientific methods whether the change is from generic to branded or visa versa. The physician can reduce these concerns to less than an estimated 5% if the patient is informed and reassured beforehand. The other factor are the "true believers," those patients or doctors that have strong or fixed beliefs about the superiority of generic or brand name medicine. In such cases, the chances are much greater that the patient you or I might experience a preference for one over the other.

I myself would not hesitate to take the generic buproprion and believe that I have in the past. It worked very well for me.


 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by clemons on June 12, 2008, at 0:30:56

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by GregS on June 8, 2008, at 0:48:54

I was just given Budeprion XL instead of Wellbutrin XL, with not a word from my pharmacist, after years of getting the brand name. I decided to do some research before I started the new drug and all I have found is disturbing news.

But mostly what I want to contribute to this conversation is to tell anyone with questions to check out ConsumerLab.com. It's a consumer advocacy group that has done its own tests (more thorough than the FDA's) in response to excessive consumer complaints. Basically they found that it is the extended release mechanism that truly causes a problem in the Budeprion, even though it is "chemically identical" to the brand name. The Budeprion is releasing its active ingredient more quickly, causing the increased side effects and decreased efficacy of the drug. They explain it more thoroughly, so go check it out for yourselves.

Anyway, just wanted to throw out some independent information so no one will think they're crazy for what they're experiencing, and maybe those who have been fortunate enough to not have a bad reaction will not try to make others feel crazy, either. I am all for generics when they work the same, and they usually do. But sometimes they don't. Personally, I will be starting my morning with however many phone calls are needed to get my Wellbutrin back.

Good luck to all

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by Bulldogmama on June 16, 2008, at 22:16:44

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by clemons on June 12, 2008, at 0:30:56

How well do I know that! My pharmacy also snuck in generic buproprion on me. I couldn't figure out what was wrong with me over the next 6 weeks or so. I read a blurb in some magazine somewhere and sure enough, my MD confirmed that the generic is sometimes not as efficacious as the brand. He said it seemed to be mostly with women. And I though I was going crazy (again)!

Needless to say, a few weeks back on Welbutrin and I was feeling tons better.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by Cindy Eggleston on June 17, 2008, at 21:18:23

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by Bulldogmama on June 16, 2008, at 22:16:44

Ah ha! I'm glad I'm not the only one who noticed this, thought I was going nuts and it was all in my head. Even on this site I've read from different people that there is no difference between generic and name brand, I'm so glad someone else noticed! I just wish my darn insurance company didn't jack our co-payment sky high for the name brand because now I am kind of stuck having to keep taking this lousy generic so called Wellbutrin.

 

Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by Manhattanbabe on June 18, 2008, at 19:25:02

In reply to Re: Budeprion (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by CaveMan on October 30, 2007, at 18:15:18

>Seven days ago I went to pick up my script from the pharmacy and I was given Budeprion XL 150mg. For the past three years I have been taking Wellbutrin XL 150mg 1 tab daily. And I have been calm, relaxed, happy, except for a occasional blue day, once in awile. Which I can deal with. The first and second day I was fine. By the third day I was so thirsty. I was anxious, couldn't sleep at nite, my mind was racing, was having these crying jags. I wanted to hide from the world. I felt I was going to explode. My memory stunk,I made a hair appt and my sister was with me. For the life of me I couldnt remember, what time it was. Me who used to worked for Dr.'s and could remember every patients name and what meds they took. My sister kept saying, what the hell is wrong with you. I felt like i was starting all over again, with being in this grey area. Which I so hated.
I take several other generic drugs for high blood pressure and thyroid and never had any other problems with.
I went online and looked up this drug and read all the negative reports written on it, and the clinical trials. I needed my Dr. to call in a new script for me. Figuring the drug company is really trying to push this drug to the masses really fast. Not thinking of the consequences that could happen.

So as I went to pick up the script today, she tell me 347.00 dollars for a sixty day supply. I look at her like your kidding me. Im not going to pay that. She hands me six pills, says to me come back on the 22 of this month and we can put it into your insurance company and they will pay most of it.
Today is the start of a new day and im back on my Wellbutrin XL and im going be back in that calm, happy, place which makes me smile and makes life so much enjoyable.

Manny aka Manhattanbabe


Ok, my insurance company switched me from Wellbutrin XL to the generic version without telling me. When the pharmacist told me it was over $100 dollars, I thought there was a mistake. No mistake here. Both my therapist and I have been sending letters and filling out forms, but I just recieved a final "NO" from AvMed.
> The generic version made me feel more depressed than ever with horrible mood swings and bursts of rage. I didn't want to go out or see my friends. All I wanted was to stay home with the doors closed, the lights out, and feel sorry for myself. When I did decide to meet some friends, I felt completely out of place. It was like I was seeing myself from the outside and just wanting to run. I could hardly maintain a conversation. Bottom line. There is a huge difference between brand vs generic budiprion.
> Jeff

 

Re: Budeprion XL (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin

Posted by On Meds Too on July 2, 2008, at 10:51:18

In reply to Re: Budeprion XL (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by BME on July 12, 2007, at 9:37:47

I too started out taking Wellbutrin XL and my pharmacy (Walgreens) automatically switched me to Budiprion XL when it came out. It was an oval yellow pill. After a few weeks I didn't feel that it was working and thought it was the drug itself and had nothing to do with it being generic. I recently moved and switched pharmacies to use one that is closer to my new house. This pharmacy, which is in a grocery store, does not buy Budiprion, but instead buys a different generic which is just listed as the the original generic name of Bupropion. This pill is the same size and shape as Wellbutrin, only it is white instead of purple like the 300mg Wellbutrin XL. This generic works as well for me as the brand name, but Budiprion did not work for me.

 

Re: Budeprion XL (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin BME

Posted by judi in Ut on July 10, 2008, at 11:04:15

In reply to Re: Budeprion XL (Generic) vs. Wellbutrin, posted by BME on July 12, 2007, at 9:37:47

I too felt like I was going crazy and it felt like a horrible depression accompanied by anxiety atack symptoms. About 2 1/2 weeks ago the pharmacey switched my Buproprion to Budeprion. Thanks to all who wrote in,especially the guy who said it felt like he was outside of himself looking in. There is a big difference in generics.
After calling my pharmacist in the middle of a bad panic attack yesterday, she said whe will have the Buproprion in today.


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