Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 536372

Shown: posts 27 to 51 of 54. Go back in thread:

 

the great part of it is...

Posted by spriggy on August 4, 2005, at 0:54:04

In reply to Re: reporter seeks interviews » Jakeman, posted by Jakeman on August 3, 2005, at 22:38:37

If you don't want to participate, you don't have to.

Other's may wish to and may find it theraputic sharing their experience and story.

 

I agree Jakeman, Spriggy, Fires!Thanks for Support (nm)

Posted by smith562 on August 4, 2005, at 8:39:22

In reply to the great part of it is..., posted by spriggy on August 4, 2005, at 0:54:04

 

Re: reporter seeks interviews » AmyHarmon

Posted by MidnightBlue on August 4, 2005, at 11:18:13

In reply to reporter seeks interviews, posted by AmyHarmon on August 1, 2005, at 13:22:19

Amy,

I've been thinking about this a good deal, and I think you might be missing the main reason some of us come to Babble. Please note I'm speaking primarily for myself here.

Most of us have already been diagnosed by a Pdoc at some point in our lives. Some by several. Sometimes we might disagree or question that diagnosis. For example, right now it seems pretty popular to label everyone with treatment resistant depression as bipolar.

I think it is inaccurate to assume that we are basically treating ourselves, though a few of us may be. I come to Babble to learn about new meds and treatments and if others are having success with them. Also for support and encouragement.

It can be discouraging to try 3 or 4 drugs and receive no benefit. If someone else has tried a drug and found that adding something else has tweaked it and made it work, then we can pass that info on to our doctors.

There may be a few people who come to Babble to diagnosis and treat themselves, but I don't think that is the majority.

If your article is primarily about internet self diagnosis I know of another area where that is going on in what I feel are much greater numbers.

MidnightBlue

 

Re: reporter seeks interviews

Posted by AmyHarmon on August 4, 2005, at 11:29:00

In reply to Re: reporter seeks interviews » AmyHarmon, posted by MidnightBlue on August 4, 2005, at 11:18:13

Thanks, your point is well-taken. I do think there's a broad spectrum of what I'm calling "self-treatment," and people do a lot of their own research and suggest or dictate to a doctor what to prescribe them fall somewhere within it. But I'd be interested to hear about the other area you mentioned where people are doing more independent self-diagnosis/self-prescription too!

> Amy,
>
> I've been thinking about this a good deal, and I think you might be missing the main reason some of us come to Babble. Please note I'm speaking primarily for myself here.
>
> Most of us have already been diagnosed by a Pdoc at some point in our lives. Some by several. Sometimes we might disagree or question that diagnosis. For example, right now it seems pretty popular to label everyone with treatment resistant depression as bipolar.
>
> I think it is inaccurate to assume that we are basically treating ourselves, though a few of us may be. I come to Babble to learn about new meds and treatments and if others are having success with them. Also for support and encouragement.
>
> It can be discouraging to try 3 or 4 drugs and receive no benefit. If someone else has tried a drug and found that adding something else has tweaked it and made it work, then we can pass that info on to our doctors.
>
> There may be a few people who come to Babble to diagnosis and treat themselves, but I don't think that is the majority.
>
> If your article is primarily about internet self diagnosis I know of another area where that is going on in what I feel are much greater numbers.
>
> MidnightBlue

 

Re: please be civil » fires

Posted by Dr. Bob on August 5, 2005, at 22:45:14

In reply to Re: Should this be redirected Dr. Bob/Everybody? » smith562, posted by fires on August 3, 2005, at 15:44:54

> Some here were very rude

Please don't post anything that could lead others to feel accused or put down.

If you or others have questions about this or about posting policies in general, or are interested in alternative ways of expressing yourself, please see the FAQ:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/faq.html#civil

Follow-ups regarding these issues should be redirected to Psycho-Babble Administration. They, as well as replies to the above post, should of course themselves be civil.

Thanks,

Bob

 

OK, I'll do better (nm) » Dr. Bob

Posted by fires on August 5, 2005, at 23:12:44

In reply to Re: please be civil » fires, posted by Dr. Bob on August 5, 2005, at 22:45:14

 

Re: reporter seeks interviews:--- Amy

Posted by alohashirt on August 6, 2005, at 1:44:58

In reply to Re: reporter seeks interviews, posted by AmyHarmon on August 4, 2005, at 11:29:00

Amy,

If you mail me at alohashirt99@yahoo.com I'd be happy to talk without attribution.

 

A message for AmyHarmon

Posted by med_empowered on August 6, 2005, at 10:46:10

Hey! Sorry to post this in babble rather than using Babblemail or whatever...as per usual, my PC is refusing to cooperate with my wishes. Anyway, if you're still looking for people to talk to, I'd like to chat with you. Your article/research sounds intriguing. If you could post a response to this, I think we could probably figure out some way to exchange the necessary contact information. Thanks for your giving all of us here at Babble a chance to participate!

 

Re: A message for AmyHarmon

Posted by spriggy on August 6, 2005, at 12:51:40

In reply to A message for AmyHarmon, posted by med_empowered on August 6, 2005, at 10:46:10

If she doesn't post back to you soon, babblemail me.

Maybe she is out of town or not at work or something.

 

Re: thanks (nm) » fires

Posted by Dr. Bob on August 8, 2005, at 9:31:49

In reply to OK, I'll do better (nm) » Dr. Bob, posted by fires on August 5, 2005, at 23:12:44

 

To Amy, Reporter for NYT

Posted by up'n'down on August 12, 2005, at 21:11:28


Dear Amy;

This is probably too late for your article, but I haven't been posting for awhile, and then thoughts have to percolate for awhile before they jell, sometimes.
You mentioned about psych patients being more into taking responsibility and action for their health care, especially meds. I know this is so, and I will tell you why it is for me. Psych issues are so very subjective. My disease determines how I function in this world.

For instance, I have Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease, and have had some very scary incidents with it. I now have 2 valve replacements; I had severe, life-threatening complications after my surgery. But I don't give near the time and attention to that part of my health.
The reason is that my psych diseases govern how I react to everything.It doesn't matter what is going on with the rest of my body if my head isn't working fairly OK.
To summarize, I have life-threatening physical diseases, but my psych disease is a living-threatening disease!
I hope this gives you some food for thought, if your still on this subject. up 'n' down

 

Ummm, uncomfortable about this

Posted by barbaracat on September 29, 2005, at 23:54:29

In reply to reporter seeks interviews, posted by AmyHarmon on August 1, 2005, at 13:22:19

I don't know why I'm getting a weird feeling about this because I was thinking of doing something similar for a book I'm planning to write. Maybe because it's the newspaper article format and the self-diagnosis do-your-own-meds theme. It feels like an invasion of privacy to alert the world to our board and our lives.

And what really is the point? What case is being laid down? What's the agenda? Letting the mass market know we're here might direct some folks needing help to our board, but I can predict that there's going to be a flood of lurkers and curiosity seekers and it will be a different board. Maybe better, maybe not.

I think the difference I feel in asking you all for info for my book is that I'd protect the privacy of my info source like a pit-bull, but I feel like there are alot of breach privacy issues here, like 'if you don't want me to use your name, I won't'. Would any of you really give a reporter your name/phone number/private email on issues this sensitive?

People who seek out and buy a book on mood disorders are likely going to be sympathetic to the issues. Just broadcasting us this way to everyone and sundry doesn't sit right with me - concerns about the difficulties we go through being viewed with respect and empathy. But you can't stop the presses, so I hope whatever gets published leaves us feeling proud instead of pissed. - BarbaraCat

 

Re: reporter seeks interviews

Posted by Laurie Beth on October 4, 2005, at 13:38:10

In reply to Re: reporter seeks interviews, posted by AmyHarmon on August 4, 2005, at 11:29:00

> But I'd be interested to hear about the other area you mentioned where people are doing more independent self-diagnosis/self-prescription too!

Fertility treatment.

 

Redirect: planning to write

Posted by Dr. Bob on October 4, 2005, at 22:35:02

In reply to Ummm, uncomfortable about this, posted by barbaracat on September 29, 2005, at 23:54:29

> I don't know why I'm getting a weird feeling about this because I was thinking of doing something similar for a book I'm planning to write...

Those are good questions that you raised, let's discuss them further at Psycho-Babble Administration. Here's a link:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/admin/20050823/msgs/563040.html

Thanks,

Bob

 

Re: reporter seeks interviews

Posted by AmyHarmon on October 5, 2005, at 10:02:04

In reply to Re: reporter seeks interviews, posted by Laurie Beth on October 4, 2005, at 13:38:10


> Fertility treatment.

really? could you explain a bit more -- that's intriguing...amy

 

Re: reporter seeks interviews » AmyHarmon

Posted by Laurie Beth on October 5, 2005, at 12:06:23

In reply to Re: reporter seeks interviews, posted by AmyHarmon on October 5, 2005, at 10:02:04

Well, this is getting off topic, so I'll e-mail you instead. But my point is that it's not just mental health patients who are doing internet research and exerting a degree of autonomy nowadays. It's probably more common for chronic health problems (it takes a while to find relevant information on the 'net) of younger people (who are comfortable with the 'net).

In fact, I just thought of a third area where patients are doing a lot of internet research and then finding doctors who will at least discuss treatment options with them: thyroid disease, see, e.g., M. Shomon (spelling?) on about.com.

 

Internet research

Posted by barbaracat on October 5, 2005, at 14:27:03

In reply to Re: reporter seeks interviews » AmyHarmon, posted by Laurie Beth on October 5, 2005, at 12:06:23

> In fact, I just thought of a third area where patients are doing a lot of internet research and then finding doctors who will at least discuss treatment options with them: thyroid disease, see thyroid.about.com.

**Put me down for fibromyalgia. Mainly because most doctors don't have a clue what causes it, it's an orphan condition, and if you want to improve, you'd best do your own footwork or learn to just live with greatly diminished quality of life.

I'd like to answer your question Amy, since this format is fine with me and I look forward to reading others' opinions. It's the private contacting and covert feeling of discussing our board that way that doesn't feel right.

So, I consider myself my primary care physician with my other doctors as my healthcare team. I am not a licensed doctor but have much of the science background and so am not flying blind. For acute illnesses and accidents my first choice is my GP or the ER, for wellness and chronic conditions, I go to a naturopath. For mental health, both conventional and alternative modalities have been necessary. But the most help and information I've gotten has been through boards like this and my own research which I will then pass on to my heathcare team. Unfortunately, I do not have utmost confidence in any one of them alone, but I'm tired of looking and as a group, there's hope.

In fact, I'll stick my neck out and say any condition that is chronic and not immedidately life threatening, does not respond well or long term to drugs OR the patient cannot afford healthcare is a candidate for do-it-yourself healthcare and self-medicating, whether it's through the internet, or just talking with friends and family. In other words, there's been an erosion of trust in the current healthcare system and people are going elsewhere.

Many of us get disgusted with the inconsistency of our healthcare and eventually look for something alternative, like a naturopath, herbalist, who usually take much longer per session to become familiar with the underlying dysfunctions, and tend to suppport wellness instead of focusing on disease. They'll consider underlying conditions that most managed care physicians today don't have the time (or experience) to sleuth out. Unless those underlying conditions are addressed, the symptom will return.

But alternative practitioners aren't perfect by a long shot either. Sometimes you just run out of healthcare people because no one has the experience or talent to deal with the environmental illnesses that are coming to light. Unless you luck upon a talented specialist, the others simply aren't much help.

This is certainly true in my fibromyalgia condition. I've gotten bits and pieces from the many types of doctors I've seen but I've had to take the time and energy I've had very little of to put the pieces together and understand the 'why' of things - something rarely discussed in a doctor's visit for lack of time.

I'd boil it down to saying that managed care has removed the 'care'. Too much beaurocracy for someone who is desperate to feel better. And although I'd venture to say that the majority of people are pretty disgusted with managed care, they're either not aware of or can't find a good integrative care doctor where they might fare better.

Eventually you realize the necessity of doing your own detective work because we finally have the means (the Internet) and we make the time because we have the greater incentive. We'll do whatever it takes to get better.

Unless it's something mechanical, like removing or repairing something or employing wonderful high-tech machinery, conventional medicine is lacking. Most doctors cannot seem to look outside the pharmaceutical box, which is where you have to go for more than just relief from acute illness.

If they're not taking the time or interest to talk to us, to find out why we're sick, how we got that way and how we can keep well, then it's up to us, but unfortunately we're not always our best doctors either. The internet empowers our self-care, either for good or for making big mistakes. - Barbara


 

NY Times story finally scheduled to run

Posted by AmyHarmon on November 15, 2005, at 21:22:24

In reply to Ummm, uncomfortable about this, posted by barbaracat on September 29, 2005, at 23:54:29

Hi, Psycho-Babblers. I wanted to let you know that the story that I posted a query on here about many moons ago is finally running in tomorrow's paper. Although the focus changed somewhat, as often happens with projects like these (I ended up focusing on young people, for instance), Psycho-Babble does make a brief appearance, and many of your comments gave me valuable insight into the subject. Thanks for letting me lurk in your midst and for sharing your thoughts. I do hope you enjoy the story. You should be able to find it at www.nytimes.com tomorrow morning.
best,
Amy

 

Re: NY Times story finally run

Posted by Dr. Bob on November 16, 2005, at 0:01:59

In reply to NY Times story finally scheduled to run, posted by AmyHarmon on November 15, 2005, at 21:22:24

> Hi, Psycho-Babblers. I wanted to let you know that the story that I posted a query on here about many moons ago is finally running

Thanks for letting us know! Here's a link:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/16/health/16patient.html?pagewanted=print

Bob

 

NY Times story finally scheduled to run - Playing » AmyHarmon

Posted by Nickengland on November 17, 2005, at 12:24:07

In reply to NY Times story finally scheduled to run, posted by AmyHarmon on November 15, 2005, at 21:22:24

Hi Amy Harmon,

>I’m looking for people to interview for an article about the growing number of Americans who are self-diagnosing their own ailments and self-prescribing their own remedies.

When you say "Americans" may I ask why you chose to use other than American people from your news report (Explained further below) By that I also mean you came here to interview people, with which you then use the head line - Young, Assured and Playing Pharmacist to Friends. Basically you're suggesting we are here "playing" - when one plays are they playing games, instruments etc? - as a child I used to play doctors and nurses. Now the media, is directly advertising to the public that as a grown adult the mentally ill are (the young ones) a culture who are now playing the role of a Pharmacist? Which truth is it that you have led the millions of readers to believe here with your story? When one plays a game is there a loser and a winner? ~ who are you making out to be the loser and the winner with your title?

>Another regular participant, known as "med-empowered," replied that the poster was out of luck, and went on to suggest a private e-mail exchange: "I think I know some sites where you could post your experience and also get info about more reliable sites."

The other poster who was - as you say or is it both posters you're saying are playing? One of them however is not from the US (not stated to the reader). He is from the UK. You stated you was looking to interview people from the US and asked questions about Direct-to-consumer drug advertising in another post. Direct to consumer advertising is illegal in the UK - but the growing trend of your perception in the US of people playing - is somewhat influenced by Direct-to-consumer drug advertising. On the other hand the relevant issue with which you quoted in your report, is relevant to the UK reader - with which opens up a whole new can of worms - to which is about UK issues...not confusing the issue with Americans and drug advertising. We don't have that. We have the NHS though which is equally as good. If this was printed in the UK Do you think an accurate description describing issues about the NHS health system, would be accurate and relevant to a reader in New York effected by Direct-to-consumer drug advertising? Would a case put forward backed up by academic research, scientific medical analysis, from a health reporter establish clearly the link and state it as follows - or would they summerise the mentally ill on a global basis as playing?

> "Which ones to take, many advertisements suggest, is largely a matter of personal choice."

Thats interesting - what about the "poster" who you quote, who is firstly not from the US, therefore I did not see that your article address other countries, and you specifically asked for people in the US, secondly he was asking how to get a refund, not how to purchase, as this was done through his privite business - which is not for the US readers of New York to be told is illegal, when US laws differ from UK - which again is touching on why is he purchasing in the first place?...because of the UK health sytem ~ the NHS, relevant to the UK and of course don't get me wrong please let the New York Readers know about why we across the water might be purchasing goods from an internet website and discussing such matters via personal email. Is your email contents viewed as personal, or public to millions of readers? And how accurate would it be for me to predict how you view stigma towards the mentally ill for instance when you publically describe them as playing to treat serious genetic mental illness? Play with the doctor and you might get burned. Play with yourself you may well keep out of the fire. Watch the media play with the public ~ and do you think that the level and perception of stigma rises or reduces with the surfaces you have touched upon? I speak for myself here about playing, as you've included UK people in your quote, I'd like to bring to your attention that i'm a grown adult who doesn't play with Consultant Psychiatrists and the heads of Pharmacists at hospitals when reaching drugs decisions to treat the symptoms of incurable biological illness.

>(in quotes: "Amy Harmon") in the search box. Or, you can just Google me and a rather random selection of my past stories…

Google.co.uk - 3rd result down.

http://annotatedtimes.blogrunner.com/snapshot/D/5/5/386D97E000120655/

>Although the focus changed somewhat, as often happens with projects like these (I ended up focusing on young people, for instance), Psycho-Babble does make a brief appearance, and many of your comments gave me valuable insight into the subject.

How much of the focus was already in place before the story went into print?

>Direct-to-consumer drug advertising, approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1997, has for most of their adult lives sent the message that pills offer a cure for any ill. Which ones to take, many advertisements suggest, is largely a matter of personal choice.

True to the US reader. However you used a UK reader in your quote ;-) A matter of personal choice?

*News Flash*

MASS *MEDIA* PLAYS AVERTISING MARKETETING STRATEGIES WHICH PROVIDES "PLAYING PHARMACIST" PUBLIC PERCEPTION ABOUT DRUG COMSUMER OF THE YOUNG MENTALLY ILL - FDA APPROVED - NYTIMES APPROVED - BUT REMEMBER ITS YOUR CHOICE. The Fda of course are of all ages, and the media who advertise in all areas are of course Assured.

The European Union currently forbids advertising of
prescription drugs to the public, as do all other
countries except the United States and New Zealand.
This restriction on advertising is part of the
protection offered to the public by prescription-only
status.

Why maintain the current ban on direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of
prescription drugs?
• DTC advertising drives up prescription drugs costs, threatening the
sustainability of national health care services and universal access to health care as a
fundamental human right.

• DTC advertising fails to inform. It does not provide the impartial, objective
information consumers and patients need for informed health care decisions.

• DTC advertising compromises public safety. It can lead to rapid widespread
exposure to dangerous drugs before risks are fully recognized, as occurred with
troglitazone (Rezulin) for diabetes and cisapride (Propulsid) for nighttime heartburn in the
US. Additionally, most new drugs are costlier than existing treatments, but few provide any
therapeutic advantage.

• DTC advertising promotes the medicalisation of normal life. The most heavily
advertised drugs are for long-term use by large target audiences, often for mild conditions
and ‘lifestyle’ problems that may not need drug therapy.

The US experience – drug costs
out of control
Spending on DTC advertising has grown exponentially
in the US within the last decade, from $55
million in 1991 to $2.5 billion in 2000. If DTCA did
not stimulate sales, companies would not be spending
more and more each year on this marketing
strategy.

>>>>>>>>>>If the money was spent on advertising was instead used for reducing stigma - making the public aware about the issues - researching develepments for more accurate diagnostic testing and drug treatment - maybe the media perception would not be that we are playing - when perhaps we are forced to do so by the media advertising itself - in effect of course - i'm playing guessing now, a minute ago the media had the public to believe I was playing pharmacist?!

Top 50 DTC advertised drugs responsible for
large cost increases
- In 2000 over 95% of DTC advertising spending
was on 50 drugs;
- These 50 drugs had combined retail sales of
$41.3 billion;
- This was nearly one third of total US retail
prescription drug spending in 2000;
- These 50 drugs were responsible for $9.94
billion of the $20.8 billion increase in US
retail prescription drug spending from 1999 to
2000, or 47.8% of this increase.

>>>>>>>>> Online interent pharmacies are not cheap - whats further interesting is on the one hand in the US you're advertised a product - with which you cannot actually buy without a prescription.... Hmmm. On the other hand you're very ill with what the doctor is giving you - the adverts/media are sending mixed messages...what do you do, you can't think properly because your mentally ill - but then hey - its your choice - when your read the papers.

The bottom line: why does the industry want
legislative change?
A US market research firm, PERQ/CHI analyzed the
returns on investments for print and television DTC
ads in 1999, based on spending and sales data supplied
by 25 major manufacturers. On each dollar
invested in DTC advertising, the average return was
$1.69 for TV ads alone; $2.51 for magazine advertising,
and $2.11 for campaigns involving a mix of
print and TV ads. (PERQ/CHI, 1999) These are
impressive returns – but they also mean impossible
costs for public and private drug plans.

“Aggressive direct-to-patient marketing by pharmaceutical companies, high prices for new drugs are
making prescription drugs one of the major costs of health care. This issue is not being given the attention it
deserves. It’s time to put science ahead of marketing.”

Health Action International (HAI) is an informal network of some
150 consumer, health, development action and other public
interest groups involved in health and pharmaceutical issues in
more than 70 countries.

http://www.haiweb.org/campaign/DTCA/BMintzes_en.pdf

>Feel free to agree or disagree -- I'm here to learn.

Me too, I learnt a lot today about culture, media, type of advertising, stigma perception and the NY Times.

Kind regards

Nick

 

Re: NY Times story finally scheduled to run - Pla » Nickengland

Posted by fires on November 17, 2005, at 14:20:07

In reply to NY Times story finally scheduled to run - Playing » AmyHarmon, posted by Nickengland on November 17, 2005, at 12:24:07

Although addressed to Amy Harmon, I will make a comment.

>> By that I also mean you came here to interview people, with which you then use the head line - Young, Assured and Playing Pharmacist to Friends. Basically you're suggesting we are here "playing" - when one plays are they playing games, instruments etc? - as a child I used to play doctors and nurses. Now the media, is directly advertising to the public that as a grown adult the mentally ill are (the young ones) a culture who are now playing the role of a Pharmacist? Which truth is it that you have led the millions of readers to believe here with your story? When one plays a game is there a loser and a winner? ~ who are you making out to be the loser and the winner with your title?<<

What verb would you have had her use? It's clear to me that see didn't use the word in the literal sense of children playing, or playing as in a competive event.

 

Re: NY Times story finally scheduled to run - Pla » fires

Posted by Nickengland on November 17, 2005, at 15:10:42

In reply to Re: NY Times story finally scheduled to run - Pla » Nickengland, posted by fires on November 17, 2005, at 14:20:07

Hi fires

>Although addressed to Amy Harmon, I will make a comment.

No worries :-)

>What verb would you have had her use?

Not really up to me to tell her what to use I guess. - I guess I would have rather further research would have been put into the article - therefore then perhaps the title would have read differently.

>It's clear to me that see didn't use the word in the literal sense of children playing, or playing as in a competive event.

Quick defintions..

noun: the act of playing a musical instrument
noun: the action of taking part in a game or sport or other recreation
noun: the performance of a part or role in a drama

Further defitions..

Play

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To engage in sport or lively recreation; to exercise for the sake of amusement; to frolic; to spot.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To act with levity or thoughtlessness; to trifle; to be careless.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To contend, or take part, in a game; as, to play ball; hence, to gamble; as, he played for heavy stakes.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To perform on an instrument of music; as, to play on a flute.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To act; to behave; to practice deception.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To move in any manner; especially, to move regularly with alternate or reciprocating motion; to operate; to act; as, the fountain plays.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To move gayly; to wanton; to disport.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To act on the stage; to personate a character.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To put in action or motion; as, to play cannon upon a fortification; to play a trump.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To perform music upon; as, to play the flute or the organ.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To perform, as a piece of music, on an instrument; as, to play a waltz on the violin.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To bring into sportive or wanton action; to exhibit in action; to execute; as, to play tricks.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To act or perform (a play); to represent in music action; as, to play a comedy; also, to act in the character of; to represent by acting; to simulate; to behave like; as, to play King Lear; to play the woman.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To engage in, or go together with, as a contest for amusement or for a wager or prize; as, to play a game at baseball.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To keep in play, as a hooked fish, in order to land it.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Amusement; sport; frolic; gambols.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Any exercise, or series of actions, intended for amusement or diversion; a game.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The act or practice of contending for victory, amusement, or a prize, as at dice, cards, or billiards; gaming; as, to lose a fortune in play.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Action; use; employment; exercise; practice; as, fair play; sword play; a play of wit.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A dramatic composition; a comedy or tragedy; a composition in which characters are represented by dialogue and action.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The representation or exhibition of a comedy or tragedy; as, he attends ever play.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Performance on an instrument of music.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion; movement, regular or irregular; as, the play of a wheel or piston; hence, also, room for motion; free and easy action.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hence, liberty of acting; room for enlargement or display; scope; as, to give full play to mirth.

http://www.brainydictionary.com/words/pl/play203760.html

Even more

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=playing

>To act on the stage; to personate a character.

Acting? Who is acting here? Personate a character - to do that in effect of a policeman is a criminal offense?

Are we criminals then? Whats the perception?

I know what she meant ~ I didn't agree with the generalised tone/perception so to speak - with regards to me personally as a reader, young whom she mentions.

How did you feel it was said? She spoke of young adults in her story...

Kind regards

Nick


 

Finding Information Online From Peers and Profess

Posted by Nickengland on November 17, 2005, at 16:44:02

In reply to NY Times story finally scheduled to run, posted by AmyHarmon on November 15, 2005, at 21:22:24

Hello Amy,

Your Article - Finding Information Online From Peers and Professionals

Says -

>Web sites and mental health support groups, many doctors agree, can provide patients with valuable information about treatments for depression, anxiety, attention deficit disorder and other problems.

:-)

>And learning about psychiatric medications from peers, they say, can destigmatize mental illness in a way that no medical authority ever could.

Yes you're right it can help destigmatise ~ you're correct - all kinds of information which is put forward which distorts areas of mental health on a global basis which can be destigmatised here. Its a very useful website for education and support.

My Applogies if my tone come across as playing "THE AMATEUR PHARMACIST" from part 8 of your series. I feel I have to applogise as I am not one.

Levels of expertise about ones brain - is in my case, known to me.

An expert Pharmacist can ask all kinds of questions to which I'll gladly take on board. Likewise I gladly question them given the chance.

When you own, lets say you own a Lamborghini Murcielago. You've taken it to a fair number of mechanics. They've looked under the bonet (hood) nothings been fixed, the problems been made worse. What do you do? Do you become an Amateur mechanic. Conversely, do you find out the exact nature of the problem as its your car (its priceless) you want it to perform the best it can. You become an expert in matters. You become an expert of what you own.

Compare that to your brain if that makes sense.

Amateur vs the expert the workings of your own brain and what makes it tick - correctly.

Speaking for myself, and reducing stigma for myself.

Best Wishes

Nick

 

...ionals - Above for Amy about the Amateur Story (nm) » AmyHarmon

Posted by Nickengland on November 17, 2005, at 18:32:07

In reply to NY Times story finally scheduled to run, posted by AmyHarmon on November 15, 2005, at 21:22:24

 

PART 8 | THE AMATEUR PHARMACISTS - Correction.

Posted by Nickengland on November 17, 2005, at 18:35:57

In reply to ...ionals - Above for Amy about the Amateur Story (nm) » AmyHarmon, posted by Nickengland on November 17, 2005, at 18:32:07

Sorry if the above come up out alittle mis-read - time for bed!

Kind regards

Nick


Go forward in thread:


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Medication | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

Script revised: February 4, 2008
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-17 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.