Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 455823

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Re: THANK YOU!!!

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 9:04:58

In reply to Re: THANK YOU!!! Daniel Hoffman, M.D., posted by KaraS on March 23, 2005, at 3:27:58

The part about technology that I find sociologically difficult is written communication vs. being in the room with a person (it is why I don't do phone psychiatry). I come off the sideline bench to clarify.

First, I hope no one thought I was implying I was the only busy person. What I was trying to say was that for those in the thread, there is a vested interest in taking their time to find help for themselves - which is both admirable as well as necessary because of some of the problems with medicine that many of you mention or allude to. I was doing it only to help and clarify misinformation - which is why I can't turn down projects and am so busy.

I meant no attack on any one email response, but was seeing a trend develop that I wanted no part of (snake oil, trying to drum up business, etc). I devote my life, literally, to this field for no compensation from the dedicated people at the "company" who have formed a volunteer army to advance psychiatry and while I understand frustration with medicine and physicians, I refuse to be lumped into that category.

I think it would be of benefit to get back on track of the real purpose of this topic. Being on the side lines, to me, meant not being as active nor discussing other failures in medicine. My role was to be factual only - not to ever comment again in these posts.

Trusting that we're on the same page, and since I'm not sure how one answeres a specific question in a forum (this is new to me) I've just been responding to the last one, hoping it encompasses everything above it. This is perhaps wrong.

The person in So. Calif who I feel is the most gifted in this area, is one of the two scientists who developed rEEG, Hamlin Emory,M.D. I suppose you could reach him through the website (www.cnsresponse.com).

 

Re: Medication signature question

Posted by Ritch on March 23, 2005, at 10:09:23

In reply to Re: THANK YOU!!!, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 9:04:58

Hi, I've got a specific question. The answer might be way over my head.. but can you clarify or discuss in greater detail how medications affect or "signature" QEEG results? .. perhaps with a specific common medication? Maybe some facts about EEG generally, might help us some. Thanks for any input.

 

Re: Daniel Hoffman M.D.--anyone in the Madison, WI

Posted by ravenstorm on March 23, 2005, at 10:27:06

In reply to Re: Medication signature question, posted by Ritch on March 23, 2005, at 10:09:23

I much appreciate your input. I am two years out of severe paxil withdrawal and still trying to find a medication. My main problem, however, is finding something that my stomach can handle.

My husband and I have decided this will be worth the money to pursue. It will be just devastating, however, if the results come back with a medication that I can not take due to disabling stomach problems.

Do you know of anyone in the midwest who does this or would be open to it?

Also, why aren't the atypicals in the data base yet? I was really disappointed to hear that as I really don't have a lot of antidepressants left to try and was thinking a low dose AP might be the next step.

The thing that really appeals to me about this process, is that, as someone who suffers withdrawal symptoms from nearly everything (prozac and wellbutrin being the only exceptions so far), it could save me months of withdrawal from another drug trial. Currently I am on mirtazapine, which, while not having enough efficacy for me, has also now started causing such severe heartburn that I am sick much of the time, can not eat normally, and the acid is starting to affect my vocal cords (even on prilosec). Unfortunately, when I tried halving the med I went into withdrawal, which for me doesn't seem to be self limiting. So, I will have to do a slow taper and hope my esophagus doesn't get erroded in the mean time. It is amazing to me that if you are mentally ill and have severe stomach problems you are pretty much out of luck.

Any input you could give about doctors in the midwest would be so much appreciated.

Thanks for braving the waters and jumping into psychobabble. I really believe this will be the future of psychiatry. It just seems so much more humane. I know it may not help me because of my stomach issues, but think of all the other people that you may have reached on this board who will be helped by your input. Thanks again.

 

Re: Daniel Hoffman M.D.--anyone in the Madison, WI

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 11:23:33

In reply to Re: Daniel Hoffman M.D.--anyone in the Madison, WI, posted by ravenstorm on March 23, 2005, at 10:27:06

The question about "signature" is not easily answered. Suffice it to say that by knowing what a drug does to brainwaves, which is pretty consistent, it can match it's effect to the problem presented to the database. So if stimulants raise "relative power" in certain parts of the brain, and the patient needs this, the database would suggest this as a possability based on their statistics of 10-20,000 medication trials and the fact that patients responded positively to that intervention. Atypicals haven't been entered due to when they started developing the database, the population they had access to and financial backing. They hope to include them when they can.

Regarding referrals, I can only suggest that you contact the company to see if they know of anyone in a particular area that is capable of providing the data to them.

While for obvious reasons I won't comment on particular cases nor practice medicine via a forum, stomach problems can be difficult but usually manageable with the H2 blockers or other GI meds. Of course some people are more sensitive than others.

 

Re: Daniel Hoffman M.D.--anyone in the Madison, WI

Posted by ravenstorm on March 23, 2005, at 11:49:18

In reply to Re: Daniel Hoffman M.D.--anyone in the Madison, WI, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 11:23:33

Ok, I will contact them. I am on H2 blockers currently to no avail. If I can't tolerate a med, stomach wise, the only thing that helps is not taking the med anymore. Thanks for the speedy reply

 

Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches

Posted by Iansf on March 23, 2005, at 17:32:40

In reply to Re: THANK YOU!!!, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 9:04:58

Dr. Hoffman,
How would you compare your approach to alternative approaches that also use brain data, such as the BrainSpect system of the Amen Clinic? There's a clinic in Walnut Creek, Calif. - whose name I can't recall - that uses some other system based on MRIs or some such. I imagine there's even more that I don't know of. All seem to focus on measures of actual brain function for either diagnosis or prescription, yet all take different approaches.

 

Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 18:59:12

In reply to Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches, posted by Iansf on March 23, 2005, at 17:32:40

> Dr. Hoffman,
> How would you compare your approach to alternative approaches that also use brain data, such as the BrainSpect system of the Amen Clinic? There's a clinic in Walnut Creek, Calif. - whose name I can't recall - that uses some other system based on MRIs or some such. I imagine there's even more that I don't know of. All seem to focus on measures of actual brain function for either diagnosis or prescription, yet all take different approaches.


SPECT imaging is cerebral blood flow. Daniel Amen has pioneered some great work in looking as sub-typing of disorders. From a clinical perspective, I find I need to know HOW to treat a brain more so than what's wrong with it. Once SPECT scans identify the areas of abnormality, it is a clinical decision knowing what medicines effect that part of the brain - and if you don't know what's off, that can be helpful. But the problems I see more is a treatment resistant patient who's been on many medications, but still has significant symptoms. I want to know which medicines, or combination of medicines, and sometimes in WHAT ORDER of use will help the person.

As far a I'm concerned, you can't give me enough information to help figure out my patients. This is the neonatal development of neuro-imaging and it won't be long before some form of scan that matches a treatment with a patient will be performed routinely before you ever even see the doctor. We're the only field of medicine that has no test for a diagnosis and this is the beginning. We still have a long way to go.

 

Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches

Posted by ravenstorm on March 23, 2005, at 20:09:19

In reply to Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 18:59:12

Exactly!!! No one would set a broken leg without an x-ray first! The developement of this technology/field is way over due in my opinion. Its too bad some of the money spent by the drug companies couldn't be used to fund this. Hopefully, the major universities now studying this will get the funding they need.

 

Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches Daniel Hoffman, M.D.

Posted by KaraS on March 23, 2005, at 22:11:22

In reply to Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 18:59:12

Dr. Hoffman,
Does the database include MAOI medications? So many physicians are reticent to prescribe them. Also, I have been afraid to try them but would be more inclined if a test showed that one of them would be a good match for me. Perhaps once this kind of testing becomes more mainstream, this would also encourage more physicians to prescribe MAOIs rather than just routinely handing out the latest SSRI.

Thanks,
Kara

 

Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 22:22:37

In reply to Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches Daniel Hoffman, M.D., posted by KaraS on March 23, 2005, at 22:11:22

> Dr. Hoffman,
> Does the database include MAOI medications? So many physicians are reticent to prescribe them. Also, I have been afraid to try them but would be more inclined if a test showed that one of them would be a good match for me. Perhaps once this kind of testing becomes more mainstream, this would also encourage more physicians to prescribe MAOIs rather than just routinely handing out the latest SSRI.
>
> Thanks,
> Kara

Yes, the database includes MAOI's, but they don't fall under the "antidepressant" category. To the brain, they act similar to the "stimulants", which is often why only certain patients respond to them. rEEG had dramatically increased my use of MAOI's. American psychiatrists way under utilize these medications. Even a website by Harvard has chastised us for not using them the way European psychiatrists do. We're so afraid of litigation that we've scared ourselves and the public from considering these meds. None of my patients have had a problem with them, but it is initially scary to think about taking them. They are afraid of all the diet and medication restrictions. Several websites have reworked the foods you can eat categorizing them into high. medium and low risk. Newer MAOI's, which are reversible (but not available in the US) will not have the interactions that we see now. I think they are a definite viable option - but until rEEG I'd never used one. Shame on me!

 

Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches Daniel Hoffman, M.D.

Posted by KaraS on March 24, 2005, at 1:16:32

In reply to Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 22:22:37

> > Dr. Hoffman,
> > Does the database include MAOI medications? So many physicians are reticent to prescribe them. Also, I have been afraid to try them but would be more inclined if a test showed that one of them would be a good match for me. Perhaps once this kind of testing becomes more mainstream, this would also encourage more physicians to prescribe MAOIs rather than just routinely handing out the latest SSRI.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Kara
>
> Yes, the database includes MAOI's, but they don't fall under the "antidepressant" category. To the brain, they act similar to the "stimulants", which is often why only certain patients respond to them. rEEG had dramatically increased my use of MAOI's. American psychiatrists way under utilize these medications. Even a website by Harvard has chastised us for not using them the way European psychiatrists do. We're so afraid of litigation that we've scared ourselves and the public from considering these meds. None of my patients have had a problem with them, but it is initially scary to think about taking them. They are afraid of all the diet and medication restrictions. Several websites have reworked the foods you can eat categorizing them into high. medium and low risk. Newer MAOI's, which are reversible (but not available in the US) will not have the interactions that we see now. I think they are a definite viable option - but until rEEG I'd never used one. Shame on me!


Thanks again. That's surprising to me that the MAOIs are in the stimulant category, not so much for Parnate but for Nardil and Marplan. I had a feeling that rEEG would (and will) lead to more use of MAOIs. rEEG sounds like such a great improvement on the way things are currently done. I'm very encouraged by it. I wonder if I might ask you one more question about how success is measured here. An SSRI/SNRI might lift mood a lot and control anxiety but leave the patient feeling apathetic and without motivation. Would this be considered success according to this diagnostic system?

K

 

Question for Dr. Hoffman M.D Daniel Hoffman, M.D.

Posted by scatterbrained on March 24, 2005, at 2:39:36

In reply to Re: rEEG System Helps Guide Prescribing, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 22, 2005, at 8:51:16

This all sounds really great and really promising and I commend you for not only using and helping develop this method but TELLING us about it. My question is as follows. After your post I read up a bit about this method and i would like to know how long you have to be off medication prior to taking the test? What if the drugs you are on are working partly but not in a lasting of complete way, it seems that going off at that moment would be sort of a gamble? Also I found that interesting what you said about maoi doing something similar to what a stimulant does considering that i take a stimulant Adderall, which has been the most helpful drug, along with zyprexa, for my depression. Perhaps an maoi would help my very extreme cognitive symptoms and anhedonia? Are there any other drugs that are not maoi that seem to do something similar in the brain as stimulants? If I could get away with not having to take an maoi, that would be ideal. Anyway, thanks again

 

To:Daniel Hoffman MD-multiple diagnoses and rEEG

Posted by Cairo on March 24, 2005, at 7:58:54

In reply to Re: rEEG System Helps Guide Prescribing, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 22, 2005, at 8:51:16

Do multiple diagnoses muddy the water with rEEGs in terms of prescribing? Or not? In my teen daughter's case, we have ADHD, dysthymia, social anxiety, Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue features, learning disabilities, dyslexia, and language disorder. How effective would an rEEG be in sorting out all these issues as symptoms overlap so much? Medication side effects are a big problem, thus limiting dosing.

Thank you for any GENERAL insight you could give regarding managing multiple diagnoses.

Cairo

 

Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 8:27:33

In reply to Re: Dr. Hoffman - alternative approaches Daniel Hoffman, M.D., posted by KaraS on March 24, 2005, at 1:16:32

> > > Dr. Hoffman,
> > > Does the database include MAOI medications? So many physicians are reticent to prescribe them. Also, I have been afraid to try them but would be more inclined if a test showed that one of them would be a good match for me. Perhaps once this kind of testing becomes more mainstream, this would also encourage more physicians to prescribe MAOIs rather than just routinely handing out the latest SSRI.
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > > Kara
> >
> > Yes, the database includes MAOI's, but they don't fall under the "antidepressant" category. To the brain, they act similar to the "stimulants", which is often why only certain patients respond to them. rEEG had dramatically increased my use of MAOI's. American psychiatrists way under utilize these medications. Even a website by Harvard has chastised us for not using them the way European psychiatrists do. We're so afraid of litigation that we've scared ourselves and the public from considering these meds. None of my patients have had a problem with them, but it is initially scary to think about taking them. They are afraid of all the diet and medication restrictions. Several websites have reworked the foods you can eat categorizing them into high. medium and low risk. Newer MAOI's, which are reversible (but not available in the US) will not have the interactions that we see now. I think they are a definite viable option - but until rEEG I'd never used one. Shame on me!
>
>
> Thanks again. That's surprising to me that the MAOIs are in the stimulant category, not so much for Parnate but for Nardil and Marplan. I had a feeling that rEEG would (and will) lead to more use of MAOIs. rEEG sounds like such a great improvement on the way things are currently done. I'm very encouraged by it. I wonder if I might ask you one more question about how success is measured here. An SSRI/SNRI might lift mood a lot and control anxiety but leave the patient feeling apathetic and without motivation. Would this be considered success according to this diagnostic system?
>
> K
>
>

Success was orinignally determined by significant changes in CGI scores that lasted over time. Now we determine success by using a "helpfulness index" to rate the value of this tool in where the patient ended up.

 

Re: Question for Dr. Hoffman M.D

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 8:30:33

In reply to Question for Dr. Hoffman M.D Daniel Hoffman, M.D., posted by scatterbrained on March 24, 2005, at 2:39:36

> This all sounds really great and really promising and I commend you for not only using and helping develop this method but TELLING us about it. My question is as follows. After your post I read up a bit about this method and i would like to know how long you have to be off medication prior to taking the test? What if the drugs you are on are working partly but not in a lasting of complete way, it seems that going off at that moment would be sort of a gamble? Also I found that interesting what you said about maoi doing something similar to what a stimulant does considering that i take a stimulant Adderall, which has been the most helpful drug, along with zyprexa, for my depression. Perhaps an maoi would help my very extreme cognitive symptoms and anhedonia? Are there any other drugs that are not maoi that seem to do something similar in the brain as stimulants? If I could get away with not having to take an maoi, that would be ideal. Anyway, thanks again


A type I test must be done with a clean or naive brain. The person must be off their meds for 5 half lifes. If after using the suggestions the person isn't where they need to be, a type II can be done on the medications for comparison purposes to see if dosing is right or if this regieme is not moving the EEG, so alternatives are recommended. This means some people who can't go off meds would be precluded from using the rEEG.

 

Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-multiple diagnoses and rEEG

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 8:32:00

In reply to To:Daniel Hoffman MD-multiple diagnoses and rEEG, posted by Cairo on March 24, 2005, at 7:58:54

> Do multiple diagnoses muddy the water with rEEGs in terms of prescribing? Or not? In my teen daughter's case, we have ADHD, dysthymia, social anxiety, Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue features, learning disabilities, dyslexia, and language disorder. How effective would an rEEG be in sorting out all these issues as symptoms overlap so much? Medication side effects are a big problem, thus limiting dosing.
>
> Thank you for any GENERAL insight you could give regarding managing multiple diagnoses.
>
> Cairo

This test does not care about what you call the problem. It simply sees how the brain is "off" and tries to match it with drugs that have a high probability of correcting it, thus, theoretically leading to symptom improvement.

 

Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?

Posted by ravenstorm on March 24, 2005, at 9:57:17

In reply to Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-multiple diagnoses and rEEG, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 8:32:00

You mentioned the newer RIMA's not avaliable in the U.S. Are these drugs, such as moclobemide (available in canada) in the drug database?

Also, doesn't a person being in drug withdrawal affect the outcome of the rEEG?

 

Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?

Posted by Iansf on March 24, 2005, at 10:41:48

In reply to Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?, posted by ravenstorm on March 24, 2005, at 9:57:17

> You mentioned the newer RIMA's not avaliable in the U.S. Are these drugs, such as moclobemide (available in canada) in the drug database?
>
What about newer drugs such as Lyrica and the new sleeping pill with anti-depressant effects, the name of which I've forgotten? Also what about epilepsy and Parkinson's drugs often used to augment antidepressants?

In fact, is there a site where we could find a list of drugs included in the rEEG data base?

 

Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 14:08:10

In reply to Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?, posted by ravenstorm on March 24, 2005, at 9:57:17

> You mentioned the newer RIMA's not avaliable in the U.S. Are these drugs, such as moclobemide (available in canada) in the drug database?
>
> Also, doesn't a person being in drug withdrawal affect the outcome of the rEEG?

I'd rather not comment on the drugs that are in or not in the database, especially for those not FDA approved in this country.

Usually a withdrawal, with a proper taper, is not in play after 5 half lifes, but a proper taper is important.

 

Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?

Posted by Phillipa on March 24, 2005, at 14:50:33

In reply to Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 14:08:10

I believe the drug you were thinking about in re to sleep and depression is Lunesta. Realesing this week. Fondly, Phillipa

 

Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?

Posted by ravenstorm on March 24, 2005, at 15:47:02

In reply to Re: To:Daniel Hoffman MD-is moclobemide included?, posted by Phillipa on March 24, 2005, at 14:50:33

You've obviously never gone through paxil withdrawal. I tapered very slowly and still had withdrawal and it lasted a lot longer than two weeks.

 

Re: Question for Dr. Hoffman M.D Daniel Hoffman, M.D.

Posted by KaraS on March 24, 2005, at 17:37:56

In reply to Re: Question for Dr. Hoffman M.D, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 8:30:33

"A type I test must be done with a clean or naive brain. The person must be off their meds for 5 half lifes. If after using the suggestions the person isn't where they need to be, a type II can be done on the medications for comparison purposes to see if dosing is right or if this regieme is not moving the EEG, so alternatives are recommended. This means some people who can't go off meds would be precluded from using the rEEG."


I can't function without any medication. The anxiety becomes unbearable and I can't eat or sleep. Would I be able to take a benzo during the drug washout time and then get the testing done with only that in my system?



 

Re: Question for Dr. Hoffman M.D

Posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 24, 2005, at 17:45:26

In reply to Re: Question for Dr. Hoffman M.D Daniel Hoffman, M.D., posted by KaraS on March 24, 2005, at 17:37:56

> "A type I test must be done with a clean or naive brain. The person must be off their meds for 5 half lifes. If after using the suggestions the person isn't where they need to be, a type II can be done on the medications for comparison purposes to see if dosing is right or if this regieme is not moving the EEG, so alternatives are recommended. This means some people who can't go off meds would be precluded from using the rEEG."
>
>
> I can't function without any medication. The anxiety becomes unbearable and I can't eat or sleep. Would I be able to take a benzo during the drug washout time and then get the testing done with only that in my system?
>
>
>
>

NO

 

Re: THANK YOU!!! Daniel Hoffman, M.D.

Posted by MeriLee on August 25, 2005, at 14:27:29

In reply to Re: THANK YOU!!!, posted by Daniel Hoffman, M.D. on March 23, 2005, at 9:04:58

> The part about technology that I find sociologically difficult is written communication vs. being in the room with a person (it is why I don't do phone psychiatry). I come off the sideline bench to clarify.
>
> First, I hope no one thought I was implying I was the only busy person. What I was trying to say was that for those in the thread, there is a vested interest in taking their time to find help for themselves - which is both admirable as well as necessary because of some of the problems with medicine that many of you mention or allude to. I was doing it only to help and clarify misinformation - which is why I can't turn down projects and am so busy.
>
> I meant no attack on any one email response, but was seeing a trend develop that I wanted no part of (snake oil, trying to drum up business, etc). I devote my life, literally, to this field for no compensation from the dedicated people at the "company" who have formed a volunteer army to advance psychiatry and while I understand frustration with medicine and physicians, I refuse to be lumped into that category.
>
> I think it would be of benefit to get back on track of the real purpose of this topic. Being on the side lines, to me, meant not being as active nor discussing other failures in medicine. My role was to be factual only - not to ever comment again in these posts.
>
> Trusting that we're on the same page, and since I'm not sure how one answeres a specific question in a forum (this is new to me) I've just been responding to the last one, hoping it encompasses everything above it. This is perhaps wrong.
>
> The person in So. Calif who I feel is the most gifted in this area, is one of the two scientists who developed rEEG, Hamlin Emory,M.D. I suppose you could reach him through the website (www.cnsresponse.com).


I whole-heartedly agree with Dr. Hoffman. Dr. Emory is extremely gifted in the area of using rEEG to prescribe. I speak from first hand experience. I have a 14 year old daughter that exhibited numerous painful, physical symptoms (stabbing abdominal pains, pains mimicking heart attacks, constant nausea, etc.) for which I took her from doctor to doctor to doctor who performed test upon test to find nothing physically wrong. She was somewhat suicidal, cut herself on occasion, called 911 at the drop of a hat, was extremely angry, and because of the pain, ended up using a wheelchair at school and a cane at home - basically, hell to live with, to say nothing about how she must have felt! Dr. Emory began working with her very aggressively and within a couple of weeks we were seeing positive results. That was 8 months ago and she just continues to get better. I now have a typical 14 year old girl, which I can handle. As I understand it, it usually doesn't take this much work to see results, but Dr. Emory said that she was one of his most difficult cases. I see a miracle and my daughter calls him her "Hero". In my mind, prescribing using rEEG is not psycho-babble. It works! Dr. Emory can be reached through his website at www.drhamlinemory.com

MeriLee (an extremely grateful mom)

 

Re: Glad that rEEG/Dr. Emory saved your daughter MeriLee

Posted by KaraS on August 25, 2005, at 21:50:46

In reply to Re: THANK YOU!!! Daniel Hoffman, M.D., posted by MeriLee on August 25, 2005, at 14:27:29

> > The part about technology that I find sociologically difficult is written communication vs. being in the room with a person (it is why I don't do phone psychiatry). I come off the sideline bench to clarify.
> >
> > First, I hope no one thought I was implying I was the only busy person. What I was trying to say was that for those in the thread, there is a vested interest in taking their time to find help for themselves - which is both admirable as well as necessary because of some of the problems with medicine that many of you mention or allude to. I was doing it only to help and clarify misinformation - which is why I can't turn down projects and am so busy.
> >
> > I meant no attack on any one email response, but was seeing a trend develop that I wanted no part of (snake oil, trying to drum up business, etc). I devote my life, literally, to this field for no compensation from the dedicated people at the "company" who have formed a volunteer army to advance psychiatry and while I understand frustration with medicine and physicians, I refuse to be lumped into that category.
> >
> > I think it would be of benefit to get back on track of the real purpose of this topic. Being on the side lines, to me, meant not being as active nor discussing other failures in medicine. My role was to be factual only - not to ever comment again in these posts.
> >
> > Trusting that we're on the same page, and since I'm not sure how one answeres a specific question in a forum (this is new to me) I've just been responding to the last one, hoping it encompasses everything above it. This is perhaps wrong.
> >
> > The person in So. Calif who I feel is the most gifted in this area, is one of the two scientists who developed rEEG, Hamlin Emory,M.D. I suppose you could reach him through the website (www.cnsresponse.com).
>
>
> I whole-heartedly agree with Dr. Hoffman. Dr. Emory is extremely gifted in the area of using rEEG to prescribe. I speak from first hand experience. I have a 14 year old daughter that exhibited numerous painful, physical symptoms (stabbing abdominal pains, pains mimicking heart attacks, constant nausea, etc.) for which I took her from doctor to doctor to doctor who performed test upon test to find nothing physically wrong. She was somewhat suicidal, cut herself on occasion, called 911 at the drop of a hat, was extremely angry, and because of the pain, ended up using a wheelchair at school and a cane at home - basically, hell to live with, to say nothing about how she must have felt! Dr. Emory began working with her very aggressively and within a couple of weeks we were seeing positive results. That was 8 months ago and she just continues to get better. I now have a typical 14 year old girl, which I can handle. As I understand it, it usually doesn't take this much work to see results, but Dr. Emory said that she was one of his most difficult cases. I see a miracle and my daughter calls him her "Hero". In my mind, prescribing using rEEG is not psycho-babble. It works! Dr. Emory can be reached through his website at www.drhamlinemory.com
>
> MeriLee (an extremely grateful mom)
>


Hi MeriLee,

I am a current patient of Dr. Emory's. I have been very impressed with his diagnostic skills so far. He quickly diagnosed my ADD which had gone undiagnosed my entire life (and I am now middle-aged.) I am in the process of trying out what he has prescribed for me. I hope I have as much success as your daughter has.

Kara



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