Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 109458

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Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*??? Mariposa

Posted by Esmarelda on January 13, 2004, at 16:50:08

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???, posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 16:42:12

I responded earlier. I am having same experience only sooner.

 

Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???

Posted by Bali on January 13, 2004, at 17:07:42

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*??? Mariposa, posted by Esmarelda on January 13, 2004, at 16:50:08

Hi Mariposa. I'm sorry that so far no one has responded. It may be due to the fact that once a person has started to feel better, they don't check the posts as often, or it may also be that mostly "newbies" come to this site. I am not a newbie nor an old hand, but I've been on Lex since October 23rd. I'm on 10MG and have begun to think that maybe I need to go up in dosage. Some of the negative thoughts that I was battling pre-Lex are seeping through. I have not had any significant upset in my life, it's just that I don't feel as positive as I did just a short week ago. From my past posts you may have read that I was almost euphoric with the good feelings I was having. So maybe it is "pooping out" on me too. I do know that is still doing something for my mood and attitude because I am smiling more than I used to but not as much as I did a month ago. I wish I could help you. Maybe someone will see our posts who has been on Lex for more than 7 months.

 

Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???

Posted by BLKVETTES on January 13, 2004, at 17:53:22

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???, posted by Bali on January 13, 2004, at 17:07:42

I to will be on lexapro for a year in february. I take it for panic attacks, anxiety and depression. In the last year I thought maybe I have been going through the poop out thing several times. Each time After a week or so Im fine again. Ive been on 7.5mgs for over 6 months thats just guessing. Being depressed or suffering from anxiety time to time is normal for anyone breathing. Sometimes a simple cold or not getting enough sleep triggers these thoughts of poop out. Cant honestly say anyone is having poop out or not. But time to time everyone is going to be depressed with really no reason. Thats just a fact and thats just the way it is!!!!!! Dont dwell on it if possible and see if it passes. The worst thing you can do is just lay around. I find going for a drive or shopping or just getting out of the house does wonders for me. Sometimes I will just sleep and that does the trick. I dont exercise much but hear from others that say that helps so much. DRINK LOTS OF WATER!!!!!!!!!
WAYNE

 

Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???

Posted by KathrynLex on January 13, 2004, at 17:56:18

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???, posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 16:42:12

Hi Mariposa,

I've only been on Lex for a little under a month. But I do have a few thoughts on "the dreaded poop-out."

Feeling inactive for only 3 days might have been a temporary slump, it might not mean you need to increase your meds. You should keep an eye on it for a few more weeks and see if your mood improves. Hopefully it will.

While I am a Lexapro "newbie" I do have some experience with other meds. When I was on Prozac I had a similar experience to yours. I took 10 mg for a year and noticed that it wasn't working as well so my pdoc increased my dose to 20 mg. That stopped being effective after about 6 mo, and I started taking 40 mg. I was horribly worried that this was the beginning of a cycle where I would have to increase my dose every six months. However, my mood was great at 40 mg for the next three years that I took it.

It's entirely possible that you simply haven't found an ideal dosage yet. Also, there are probably other drugs you can take in addition to the Lex that increase its effectiveness.

Having a drug poop-out on you is frustrating, not to mention disappointing. I hope that your mood slump is temporary.

K.

 

TO WAYNE

Posted by Bali on January 13, 2004, at 18:28:06

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???, posted by BLKVETTES on January 13, 2004, at 17:53:22

Wayne, Thanks for your response. I actually exercise a whole lot, but only drink water during the time I'm exercising. I don't drink water at all at other times. I drink Crystal Light and caffeine free Diet Coke (I know, really bad, huh?). I am going to make a conscious effort to drink water, though. Anything to get this drug to work as it did a couple of weeks ago. I hate the dark thoughts I am having again. I actually hide them very, very well, but I'm having them again. (To much lesser extent, though.) Any thoughts from anyone? Bali

 

Re: I'm leaning towards no on Lexapro

Posted by Vandy on January 13, 2004, at 20:08:23

In reply to Re: I'm leaning towards no on Lexapro, posted by Gaza on January 13, 2004, at 14:28:17

10 months here! I'll give that question a shot. (Ooops, does everything have more than one meaning. Darn, I'm just going to let it happen.)

It will come. (See what I mean!) But you have to relax. It's just like any other orgasm, or waiting for Santa Claus or your team to win the super bowl. If you get all aprehensive it won't come as fast. Just relax. (Yeah, Vandy is a man, in case you didn't know.) Now for the distaff side of things. I'm married to a wonderful lady who's been taking Lex for over a year. She's very honest. Couldn't lie if she had to do it. I made her promise never to fake it. She promised. She says it comes back, too. For both of us it's just like before only better. Amazing how depression and anxiety can inhibit good sex. It's also amazing how great sex can be without anxiety and depression.

> 7 months?! Can you answer the orgasm question from the previous post. It sure would be nice to know what to expect 7 months out. Please?
>
> > I have been on Lex for 7 months. I did not really have any side effects except for some loss of appetite and nausea. I did feel more depressed and anxious before I got better. At week 5 or so, the Lex really kicked in and I felt a lot better. Hang in there!
>
>

 

Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???

Posted by Vandy on January 13, 2004, at 20:16:26

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???, posted by Bali on January 13, 2004, at 17:07:42

Started ten months ago on 20 mg. from the beginning. Never increased. Never decreased. The only variations I've tried is to do 10 mg. A.M. and 10 mg. P.M. No noticable effect so I went back to 20 all at once. I'm taking it in the evening now. That's something the good people in this thread suggested. It worked for me.

No poop out yet.

My wife is a 10 mg. Lex person. Never complained of side effects, been on it a year and shows no poop out signs.

> Hi Mariposa. I'm sorry that so far no one has responded. It may be due to the fact that once a person has started to feel better, they don't check the posts as often, or it may also be that mostly "newbies" come to this site. I am not a newbie nor an old hand, but I've been on Lex since October 23rd. I'm on 10MG and have begun to think that maybe I need to go up in dosage. Some of the negative thoughts that I was battling pre-Lex are seeping through. I have not had any significant upset in my life, it's just that I don't feel as positive as I did just a short week ago. From my past posts you may have read that I was almost euphoric with the good feelings I was having. So maybe it is "pooping out" on me too. I do know that is still doing something for my mood and attitude because I am smiling more than I used to but not as much as I did a month ago. I wish I could help you. Maybe someone will see our posts who has been on Lex for more than 7 months.

 

Mariposa

Posted by Journeyman on January 13, 2004, at 21:06:24

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???, posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 16:42:12

Hi Mariposa,

I've been on Lex only since Nov. 21, so can't address your particular question, so I'll stick with what I can talk about.

Your presence on this board has helped a number of us significantly. In fact, whether you've written to us directly, or we've just enjoyed the benefits of gathering knowledge from your experience - your encouragement, support, good-heartedness, and helpful suggestions have helped every one of us. (Who among us hasn't learned from the Mariposa Chronicles?)

Vandy's post was helpful (as always), so reread it at least 5 times.

When the blue meanies come back to haunt us, however briefly, it's scary. However, as unsettling as that is, it doesn't necessarily mean that we've suddenly reverted to some earlier state where all we could see was pain, isolation, desperation, and no escape.

To be honest, I think it would be a much more troublesome situation, if we didn't have days when we felt a little sad. That's part of life, and a healthy response to some of the things that go on around (and in) us. Stop for a moment to think about the kind of job you have. (okay, that's long enough! You don't need to bring it ALL back). You spend virtually all of your time dealing with people who need something from you, and give you little or nothing in return for it. Even the healthiest of people, with no environmental or genetic causes for depression, would have moments, days, phases where they would feel 'down' because of circumstances. In a way, your current feelings may just be a very healthy response.

I in no way wish to diminish the potential serousness of your feelings, or deny they aren't real. Of course they are. But to an extent, I think we're all like butterflies (to borrow from your name), in that some of the flowers we land on won't be as pleasant as others (that would be impossible), so we'll keep going and find others that give us what we need. That's just part of the journey.

Thank you for responding to the questions I had when I first posted on this site. It really helped.

May your flight be winged with beauty and grace, and take you where you wish to go.

Journeyman/Richard

 

Re: Thank you guysSO MUCH - I love this place!

Posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 21:52:29

In reply to Mariposa, posted by Journeyman on January 13, 2004, at 21:06:24

Thank you to all who resonded, I came home and found all these wonderful encouraging messages - JUST WHAT I NEEDED!!! You all have very good advice, and I'm going to try to stay positive (as I have encouraged many of you to do also). My hope is that I have not yet found my *ideal* dosage, and better times are ahead.

This is why I find myself coming back, the Best Support Group I have found in all my searching the Internet!! THANKS AGAIN TO EACH OF YOU!!!~~~8|8

 

Re: Mariposa Journeyman

Posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 21:54:43

In reply to Mariposa, posted by Journeyman on January 13, 2004, at 21:06:24

> Hi Mariposa,
>
> I've been on Lex only since Nov. 21, so can't address your particular question, so I'll stick with what I can talk about.
>
> Your presence on this board has helped a number of us significantly. In fact, whether you've written to us directly, or we've just enjoyed the benefits of gathering knowledge from your experience - your encouragement, support, good-heartedness, and helpful suggestions have helped every one of us. (Who among us hasn't learned from the Mariposa Chronicles?)
>
> Vandy's post was helpful (as always), so reread it at least 5 times.
>
> When the blue meanies come back to haunt us, however briefly, it's scary. However, as unsettling as that is, it doesn't necessarily mean that we've suddenly reverted to some earlier state where all we could see was pain, isolation, desperation, and no escape.
>
> To be honest, I think it would be a much more troublesome situation, if we didn't have days when we felt a little sad. That's part of life, and a healthy response to some of the things that go on around (and in) us. Stop for a moment to think about the kind of job you have. (okay, that's long enough! You don't need to bring it ALL back). You spend virtually all of your time dealing with people who need something from you, and give you little or nothing in return for it. Even the healthiest of people, with no environmental or genetic causes for depression, would have moments, days, phases where they would feel 'down' because of circumstances. In a way, your current feelings may just be a very healthy response.
>
> I in no way wish to diminish the potential serousness of your feelings, or deny they aren't real. Of course they are. But to an extent, I think we're all like butterflies (to borrow from your name), in that some of the flowers we land on won't be as pleasant as others (that would be impossible), so we'll keep going and find others that give us what we need. That's just part of the journey.
>
> Thank you for responding to the questions I had when I first posted on this site. It really helped.
>
> May your flight be winged with beauty and grace, and take you where you wish to go.
>
> Journeyman/Richard

Beautiful, elloquent, so encouraging, your posts are always exceptional!! Thank you!!!~~~8|8

 

Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*??? Esmarelda

Posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 22:02:10

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*??? Mariposa, posted by Esmarelda on January 13, 2004, at 16:50:08

> I responded earlier. I am having same experience only sooner.

I'm sorry, somehow I missed the post. How are you dealing w/it? I'm anxious and worry about it too much, and coming here helps. Makes me realize I'm just *obsessing* (another problem Lex has helped curb). Thanks for responding.~~~8|8

 

Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???

Posted by Yogi on January 14, 2004, at 3:23:44

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*??? Esmarelda, posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 22:02:10

Hi, has anyone taken Lexapro for OCD? If so, did it help?

 

CAFFEINE

Posted by BLKVETTES on January 14, 2004, at 4:53:54

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*??? Esmarelda, posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 22:02:10

SORRY I POSTED THIS TWICE!!!!!!!! I PUT THE WRONG SUBJECT. THATS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU THINK BEFORE DAYLIGHT!!!!!! I have a feeling quite a few of you consume a lot of caffeine. In a sense some develop a toxicity. It can mimic biopolar disorder and also anxiety disorder. The article is kind of deep but parts are easy to understand.

>With the upswing of "chemical imbalance" disorders that surfaced in the latter twentieth century, many researchers frantically attempt to unravel the brain's intricate clockworks. In turn, as the number of persons suffering with mental issues mount, it seems that doctors, pressed for time, are quick to refer patients to psychiatrists. Failing to request a medical physical, many psychiatrists hand out medications, often masking the underlying physical problem.
People have overlooked two simple but deleterious factors: 1,3,7 trimethylxanthine and allergy. Simply put: caffeine allergy. It is medical knowledge that the longer a person is exposed to a drug, the higher the chances are for developing a tolerance, and an allergy to the substance. Once this happens, caffeine allergic persons can't properly metabolize caffeine, which is rapidly absorbed by all organs, and distributed into intracellular compartments, and extracellular water.
Mentioned in a 1936 article by Drs. McManamy and Schube, a young woman, allergic to caffeine, presented with alternating states of delirium and mania, resembling schizophrenia (1). After the recorded case, allergy documentation becomes rare. And not surprisingly.
The drug's stimulating properties masks its allergic symptoms. Circulating adrenaline (epinephrine) increases in caffeine consuming persons (2,3). In its synthetic form, epinephrine is the drug of choice for anaphylactic reactions, halting allergic reactions. But added to a stimulant reaction, excess adrenaline may induce delusions. And the breakdown of some adrenaline byproducts mimics symptoms of schizophrenia (4).
Brain levels increase proportionately with dosage (5). In allergic persons, each cup of coffee, cola, tea, every piece of chocolate, and any ingested caffeine products, intensifies toxic psychosis. Half-life increases. Subsequent doses, including minute amounts, act as a bolus. Cells are poisoned, including neurons.
Symptoms of cerebral allergy can range from minimal reactions, such as lack of comprehension and inability to focus, to severe psychotic states, such as delusions, paranoia, and hallucinations (6). It's known that amphetamine psychosis can't be distinguished from schizophrenia (7,8). With a caffeine allergic person's inability to eliminate, continually ingesting caffeine, neurotransmitter levels, including dopamine and adrenaline, quickly increase. Cells rapidly absorb the drug.
Dopamine increases proportionately to the amount of stress (9). The higher the adrenaline level, the greater the increase in dopamine. Serotonin also increases. Dopamine and serotonin decrease during partial, toxic withdrawal states. But as long as caffeine remains in the toxic body, neurotransmitters never adjust to the victim's natural state.
Toxicity is known to cause excitement, agitation, restlessness, shifting states of consciousness, and toxic psychosis (10), mimicking amphetamine psychosis. Allergic individuals may be erroneously diagnosed, medicated, and lost in a dark disturbed world, until death.
Adenosine receptors are blocked by caffeine (11,16), maintaining neuronal firing. Persons remain excited and often euphoric.
Caffeine toxicity may be mistaken for bipolar disorder (1,12). Symptoms include: chattiness, repetitive thought and action (resembling obsessive compulsive disorder, OCD), restlessness, psychomotor agitation, alternating moods, anger, impulsiveness, aggression, omnipotence, delirium, buying sprees, lack of sexual inhibition, and loss of values.
Allergy can mimic Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) (13). As far back as 1902, T. D. Crothers noted that many caffeine consuming children "exhibit precocity" and "functional exaltation" (14).
Caffeine poisoning may also resemble schizophrenia. One woman's conversational topics wandered from subject to subject. She screamed, and believed that she was in prison. Natural judgement was impaired (1). In 1931, a truck driver brought to the hospital in a confused and irritable condition, complained of being attacked by flies. Flies were never present. Examination revealed that he'd consumed large amounts of cola (15). One gentleman ended his political speech with predictions and threats, out of the ordinary for his personality, stunning the audience (14). Another case describes a man, who imagined himself very wealthy, and assumed that his mental state was normal (14).
Caffeine toxicity may also masquerade as depression, and anxiety. In 1925, Powers described nervousness, visual problems, and dizziness, in patients he discovered suffered from caffeine toxicity (16). In 1974, caffeine toxic patients, experiencing the same symptoms, were erroneously admitted to a psychiatric hospital, for treatment of anxiety (16,17). In other studies, depression and anxiety are also correlated with caffeine intake (18,19,20,21).
In several reports, patients diagnosed with anxiety disorder experienced panic attacks with ingestion of caffeine (18,19,20). One study reveals that six persons improved with caffeine cessation and remained improved for at least six months (21). Other reports reveal that some persons not afflicted with panic disorder, experienced panic attacks with intravenously administered caffeine (22, 23).
Written materials on panic disorder symptoms and anaphylactic symptoms do not clearly differentiate between the two. Parasthesia (pins and needle sensations), a feeling of choking, hyperactive symptoms, chest pains, and hyperventilation, amongst other symptoms, are common in both conditions. They're also common in many caffeine consuming persons.
This suggests that caffeine allergy may be responsible for many cases of panic disorder. In which case, panic attacks in allergic individuals are suppressed anaphylactic reactions - mimicking ADHD, and panic disorder. They're "have to get up and run" and "I think I'm losing my mind" feelings, brought about by increased neurotransmitter levels, associated with the "fight or flight" syndrome.
Dr. William Walsh connected anxiety and severe allergic reactions. Dr.Walsh maintains that allergic anxiety stems from a choking sense, and loss of air; not a psychological deficit (24).
Caffeine converts into many byproducts, including theophylline. Theophylline keeps the bronchial tubes open. Allergic individuals are less likely to suffer respiratory collapse, during an anaphylactic reaction.
A proficient Boston neurologist mentions that sixty-six percent of elevated CPK MM (creatine phosphokinase of muscle) levels are of an "unknown origin" (25). Innumerable mid to late twentieth century studies reveal that a high number of persons diagnosed with mental disorders, including personality disorder, mania, BPD, depression, catatonia, and schizophrenia, exhibit elevated CPK MM levels (26,27,28-38,39,40-50).
The high majority of these studies, and others, attribute elevated CPK levels to a commonality between patients with mental disorders. Not one focuses on caffeine allergy as a contributing factor of mental disorders.
CPK MM, a muscle enzyme, increases with severe muscle trauma, burns, inflammatory states, and poisoning. This may stem from drugs (36,37,38,39), including cocaine, alcohol, amphetamines, heroin, and stimulants (37,40). Antihistamines, salicylates, cyclic antidepressants, theophylline, and others also cause this disorder (37).
This condition, called rhabdomyolysis, stresses and inflames tissues, including brain cells, breaking down muscle fibers, and discharging potentially toxic cellular matter into the bloodstream (37). Caffeine poisoning can cause rhabdomyolysis (10,37,41).
Myoglobinuria is a symptom of rhabdomyolysis, but often urine myoglobin disappears early in the course of the disorder, or is absent altogether (37). Generalized muscle cramping (associated with rhabdomyolysis) (14,37) may also be absent, or subside early on. Accumulation of caffeine acts as morphine, alleviating pain and discomfort, often inducing muscle rigidity.

With toxins leaking into the bloodstream, the CPK increases. The higher the CPK, the higher the neurotransmitters, and the deeper into psychosis a person spirals.

In the late 1960's, Bengzon et al proposed that the leakage of CPK and aldolase might explain schizophrenia (26). Studies on patients with non-restrictive diets, concentrated on various factors, including medication, but failed to include caffeine as a possible factor (26). More recent studies have also overlooked caffeine allergy as a factor in any mental disorders, including schizophrenia.

A study theorized caffeine as a possible, psychosis inducing agent. Researchers eliminated patients' caffeine for a short duration. It was decided that caffeine aggravates symptoms of thought disorder and psychosis (42). Caffeine was reintroduced-never allowing for sufficient withdrawal times-and significant improvements.

Proportionate to toxicity, physical withdrawal may take up to 12 months, or longer. Recovery symptoms include memory loss, confusion, tremors, agitated states, insomnia or somnolence, and nightmares associated with amphetamine withdrawal. Following physical recovery, residual mental symptoms, primarily confusion and mood alterations, may exist for several months.

Evidence suggests that caffeine, and synthetic neurotransmitter altering medications, merely balance one another, and that upon cessation of caffeine, medication is no longer needed. Several reports indicate that upon caffeine cessation, tremors increased in lithium consuming individuals (43). In some patients, caffeine withdrawal increased lithium levels (44). After experiencing a 10-year course of seasonal BPD, a woman eliminated caffeine from her diet. She no longer needed BPD medication (45).

Caffeine may compete for benzodiazepine receptors (5). In which case, benzodiazepines reduce caffeine's effects and vice versa; balancing each other.

Chronic toxicity may affect functional aspects of every organ (14). Allergic persons may become sensitive to bright light, and resort to sunglasses. It's not uncommon to find dilated but reactive pupils on examination (14). Toxic persons usually present with a whitish, or grayish coated tongue (14, 46). Other findings imply that caffeine inhibits anaphylaxis, by suppressing histamine release (47,48). Due to caffeine's antihistamine properties, a skin test for caffeine allergy may be negative.

Several laboratory tests may be used as markers for allergic toxicity. A detectable Theophylline level in a patient not receiving Theophylline therapy, and an elevated CPK level are indicative of caffeine toxicity. Along with these, an increased glucose level (10,49) and an elevated white blood count (1,49) may also be significant of toxicity, as many patients assumed afflicted with mental disorders present with elevation of these (1,50). An elevated sedimentation rate, indicative of inflammatory processes, might signify rhabdomyolysis.

It's highly probable, that millions of consumers developed an allergy to caffeine, especially since availability and production increased rapidly mid- twentieth century. In which case, natural insights, and physical and mental health, have been sacrificed to chronic toxicity, resulting in organic brain, silently posing as ADD, ADHD, anxiety, BPD, depression, OCD, panic, and schizophrenia. Physical ailments resemble amphetamine poisoning, and include drug eruptions, masquerading as "rosacea."

Back in 1936, McManamy and Schube maintained that in all probability, many people of that era might have already been erroneously diagnosed with some form of mental illness. The doctors further predicted, that in the future, with lack of time, and proper medical insight, many doctors would not be able to diagnose simple disorders such as caffeine allergy, and would label many patients as psychotic (1).
Well, here we are. Welcome to the future.

WAYNE

 

Re: CAFFEINE

Posted by vandy on January 14, 2004, at 6:27:31

In reply to CAFFEINE, posted by BLKVETTES on January 14, 2004, at 4:53:54

Reminds me of that Three Stooges bit: "I am trying to think but nothin' happens!" Nyuk nyuk nyuk

 

Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP

Posted by Mrs C. on January 14, 2004, at 8:53:47

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP , posted by dreaminoftx on January 12, 2004, at 9:10:25

> Your messages have helped me so very much to understand that I can get through the side effects with time. The medication has helped me feel so very much better! Thanks for sharing!

I'm so glad that you are feeling better and that I have helped. This board got me through the first difficult weeks too. Mrs. C.

 

Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP

Posted by hanging on on January 14, 2004, at 8:54:07

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP , posted by Gaza on January 13, 2004, at 14:32:26

day 8 of lex and feeling anxiety today. to many pressures in the world. job insecurity, the economy, wife and child... is this really going to help me get through life? how does anyone handle this? Please someone tell me what you do to get through...

 

Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP

Posted by Mrs C. on January 14, 2004, at 8:56:26

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP , posted by hanging on on January 12, 2004, at 11:15:45

> just started on 10mg of lex. on day 6. its going a little rough. I think I have had long term depression, but it has been brought to the surface due to recent job insecurity. Was on effexor for about a year in 2001... didn't work well.
>
> Trouble focusing. No end in sight. Will this actually get better? Will I actually feel better? Even if my life situation doesn't improve? thanks for some support.

It will absolutely get better. Hang in there and as I have said before, please read old posts on this board. Anything you are feeling right now I am positive someone else has felt it and is now feeling great! Mrs. C

 

Re: Day 21 and a ?

Posted by Mrs C. on January 14, 2004, at 9:00:34

In reply to Day 21 and a ?, posted by sexylexy on January 12, 2004, at 21:17:50

I like my husband alot better since I started Lex. Although the first month I sort of felt numb. Not really sad but not happy either. That has been replaced by more patience and more acceptance towards his annoying habits and more appreciation for his good qualities. We've been married 15 years this February so we are obviously committed to eachother but every little bit helps. Good Luck! Mrs. C.

 

Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP

Posted by LynneDa on January 14, 2004, at 9:09:49

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP , posted by hanging on on January 14, 2004, at 8:54:07

Hanging on -
Give it a little more time . . . you will get there! From all the posters here, it seems to take an average of 4 - 6 weeks to feel evened out. Your body is still adjusting. Once it starts working, you will be better able to deal with all the pressures and stress. I find that troubles come in layers and the more I have, the more it hurts. But with this medication, my anxiety has diminished to the point that I can peel away some of the layers and don't feel quite so burdened by every little thing. That way, I can deal with the really big things and let go of the smaller, nagging things.

You'll start seeing small changes in your abilities (like I finally had the mental energy to clean out under my bathroom sink or I finally cleaned out a particular file drawer at work). Sounds insignificant, but you'll start seeing these changes in a couple of weeks.

I hope this makes sense and helps a bit! Please don't give up, you just need a little more time. We're here for you!
~ Lynne

 

Mariposa - THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???

Posted by Esmarelda on January 14, 2004, at 9:20:00

In reply to Re: IS IT THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*??? Esmarelda, posted by Mariposa on January 13, 2004, at 22:02:10

I am not sure what to do. I upped my dosage around the first of December because I was staying depressed since before Thanksgiving. I think the holidays may have something to do with it as I never do well during them, I think I have always had seasonal affective disorder and this was the first holidays without my beloved grandmother. However, be that as it may, I stayed busy enough that the holidays weren't too bad, but as soon as everything was over, I felt like I crashed. So, about a week ago, I started taking Wellbutrin with Lexapro to see if that helps. I seem to just not be able to get up and do it in the mornings. I get better as the day wears on. But, the bad part is I can really feel the disease lying to me again and putting negative thoughts in my head although I try to push them out. I hope this helps. I am hanging in there. If I have to increase or the Wellbutrin winds up helping, then so be it! Take care and you have helped me alot over the last few months. I truly wish you the best!

 

Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP hanging on

Posted by BobYuma on January 14, 2004, at 11:15:33

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP , posted by hanging on on January 14, 2004, at 8:54:07

> > > day 8 of lex and feeling anxiety today. to many pressures in the world. job insecurity, the economy, wife and child... is this really going to help me get through life? how does anyone handle this? Please someone tell me what you do to get through > > >

Dear, hanging on:
First of all, God bless you, life can certainly appear to be anything but a bowl of cherries most of the time, can't it?
Second, yes, Lexapro really will help you get through life. I promise. At eight days, you're still taking baby steps as far as Lexapro being able to help you. Trust that with each day, Lexapro is settling itself deeper within your system in order to do what it's meant to do ... help you through life.

Meanwhile, there are things you can do to help yourself. First of all, if you're a religious or spiritual person, or even if you're not, don't forget to say a prayer every morning that you live. This is imperative for being able to "get through life on earth" ... trust me. Just ask God to help you though the next few hours, don't worry about tomorrow, it'll be taken care of in time.

That's pretty close to the second thing you need to do, and that's live life one-second at a time. Everyone tells us to take things "a day at a time" .. well, a day is too much to take at one time. Don't think any further than the moment that you're now living in. Think about how you feel "now" .. but know that you are going to feel better no matter how bad you may feel at any given moment.

I honestly believe that being able to do this can help us more that just about anything else we can do, other than prayer. Try not to think about how you're going to handle what happens tomorrow, or next week or month, just the present moment.

I'm not saying it's easy to live one moment at a time, it takes a lot of practice. But if you try it, and succeed, you'll be surprised at what a load it takes off of you, and how good you feel about life.


Moments

Our lives are made up of a millions different moments.

Some moments are spent searching for love, searching for peace and harmony, and laughing with loved ones. Other moments are spent simply surviving life.

But that life, with all it's joys and sorrows, is meant to be lived one moment at a time. It is with this knowledge that we discover a most wonderful truth ...
that Life was actually meant to be enjoyed.

Whether we live in a forty-room mansion, surrounded by servants and wealth, or find it a struggle to manage the rent month to month, we have it within our power to be fully satisfied and live a life full of true meaning.

Living one moment at a time we have that ability, through cherishing each moment and rejoicing in each smile, each dream.
Bringing tender awareness, forgiving awareness, merciful awareness to each moment. We can experience each day anew, and with this fresh start we have what it takes to make all our dreams come true.

Each moment is new, and living one moment at a time enables us to truly enjoy our life and live it to the fullest.

Take care, BobYuma

 

Re: Wonderful inspiration! BobYuma

Posted by LynneDa on January 14, 2004, at 11:23:20

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP hanging on, posted by BobYuma on January 14, 2004, at 11:15:33

Bob - that's wonderfully inspirational for us all (as your posts usually are!). Thank you, I'll be looking back at that one again and may even print it out :-) I wish everyone the ability to be able to live in the moment and appreciate the small things that are sent our way!

~ Lynne

 

Re: Mariposa - THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???

Posted by Gaza on January 14, 2004, at 11:43:30

In reply to Mariposa - THE DREADED *POOP-OUT*???, posted by Esmarelda on January 14, 2004, at 9:20:00

2 questions: How much Wellbutrin are you taking, and do you have to go to work when you get up in the morning.

> I am not sure what to do. I upped my dosage around the first of December because I was staying depressed since before Thanksgiving. I think the holidays may have something to do with it as I never do well during them, I think I have always had seasonal affective disorder and this was the first holidays without my beloved grandmother. However, be that as it may, I stayed busy enough that the holidays weren't too bad, but as soon as everything was over, I felt like I crashed. So, about a week ago, I started taking Wellbutrin with Lexapro to see if that helps. I seem to just not be able to get up and do it in the mornings. I get better as the day wears on. But, the bad part is I can really feel the disease lying to me again and putting negative thoughts in my head although I try to push them out. I hope this helps. I am hanging in there. If I have to increase or the Wellbutrin winds up helping, then so be it! Take care and you have helped me alot over the last few months. I truly wish you the best!

 

Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP hanging on BobYuma

Posted by hanging on on January 14, 2004, at 11:45:42

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP hanging on, posted by BobYuma on January 14, 2004, at 11:15:33

thank you so much for the support... it realy does help.

I feel I have so much to be thankful for and am very fortunate, but many times I feel I have no where to go but down from here. Any shift in the "plan" makes me think its all going to go down... I am hanging in there... thanks again.

 

Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP hanging on BobYuma

Posted by Esmarelda on January 14, 2004, at 11:51:03

In reply to Re: Loosing my mind on Lex? - HELP hanging on, posted by BobYuma on January 14, 2004, at 11:15:33

You're Great Bob!


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[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

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