Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 240098

Shown: posts 8 to 32 of 32. Go back in thread:

 

vitamin recommendations? McPac

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 10, 2003, at 8:53:08

In reply to Re:just wanted to ad. . . ., posted by McPac on July 10, 2003, at 0:07:38

> Taking a very good form of magnesium, such as magnesium glycinate, may help. I would seriously try the glycinate form, highly absorbable.

Did you suggest this as a form of migraine prevention?

When I remember to, I'm currently taking 5 cal-mag citrate (1875 mgs) daily. Now that I think of it, last month I did not have the severity of menstrual migraine when I adhered to a vitamin schedule. (For anti-pms, I also took 350 mgs of omega 3's and an evening primrose oil.)

Is the citrate form not as absorbable, I wonder?

 

epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes

Posted by avid abulia on July 10, 2003, at 11:59:14

In reply to vitamin recommendations? McPac, posted by bookgurl99 on July 10, 2003, at 8:53:08

> > Taking a very good form of magnesium, such as magnesium glycinate, may help. I would seriously try the glycinate form, highly absorbable.
>
> Did you suggest this as a form of migraine prevention?
>
> When I remember to, I'm currently taking 5 cal-mag citrate (1875 mgs) daily. .)
>
> Is the citrate form not as absorbable, I wonder?
>


Hey, i have migraines and epilepsy, both. He is probably concerned about epilepsy as a possible cause because it is not uncommon to see persisting neurological deficits in epilepsy (it can happen in migraine, but is less frequent). The sleep apnea would be an issue, because some evidence suggests that migraine is at least partially related to poor oxygen metabolism in the mitochondria (which is why riboflavin is often recommended--it improves oxygen utilization there). Magnesium citrate and magnesium glycinate are roughly the same so far as bioavailability is concerned--but magnesium glycinate, as well as magnesium taurinate, may be superior because the glycine and taurine derived from these forms are both inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitters.

Additionally, researchers at the university of colorado have found through MRI studies that the lower brain centers of migraineurs have crystalline iron deposits in them--so iron restiction may help, or may not. Curcuminoids, found in turmeric, chelate free iron and lead to kidney excretion, so in theory putting more turmeric (preferably in the form of curry, because the black pepper in curry dramatically increases absorption) *might* help, all though i know of no studies backing this.

You mention that your neurological changes have gotten worse, the more you experience migraines--perhaps (if you have good insurance!) Keppra may be useful in that case, because it (more so than other AEDs used for migraine prophylaxis) has been shown to have a specific anti-kindling effect (i.e. it prevents and reverses the phenomenon of more attacks leading to increased frequency and severity in a vicious cycle).

There is very little support for use of triptans as prophylactic drugs, and there is quite a bit of evidence for adverse vascular effects such as stroke and hypertension. They also exacerbate pre-existing seizure disorders. You may want to discuss risk/benefit ratio with your doc.

I currently am using a combo of Lamictal and Keppra, for prophylaxis of seizures and migraine, as well as for "bipolar disorder due to a general medical condition" and when i experience the prodromal symptoms (the symptoms in the day(s) before the aura and actual attack) i take diltiazem CD (a calcium-channel blocker) to make sure my arteries stay dilated (the symptoms of migraine are due to spasm of arteries and a resulting dilation of arterioles in an effort to force greater blood flow by creating a vacuum effect)... i only take the diltiazem during the prodromal period to make sure my body doesn't build a tolerance to it, because it most annoyingly does that quite easily to most drugs, more so than the average person.

A rescue drug that has received relatively little attention, but has fairly good support, is an intravenous bolus of magnesium sulfate, 500-1000mg. You might wish to discuss that with your doc.

Additionally, fish oils are sometimes useful, because of their anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic (nerve-nourishing) effects.

Hope that helps some.

~AA

 

Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!

Posted by Angel1 on July 10, 2003, at 21:41:47

In reply to menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!, posted by bookgurl99 on July 8, 2003, at 13:15:35

I know you are only 27, but maybe it is hormonally related. the week of your period, your estrogen and progesterone are at a low point.

Researchers are finding out now that some women's hormones are too low and it affects their minds and bodies in negative ways. You might want to get your hormone levels checked, even at your age. Especially, estradiol levels. I know it may sound like a long shot, but it could be the answer too. =It's my Ovaries, Stupid= is the name of the book for such information.

 

Re: epilepsy questions

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 10, 2003, at 22:45:39

In reply to epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes, posted by avid abulia on July 10, 2003, at 11:59:14

AA,

thanks so much for your well-thought-out post.

a question re: persistent neuro deficits in epilepsy; do you ever get some of these losses back? last year, when i had my 'severe migraine'/whatever, i became quite confused. (btw, this was accompanied with a severe headache.) however, within a few weeks i had 'most' of me back, except for a persistent shorter term memory and (to me) slightly slower processing. scans (ct and mri) and eeg, as you know, showed nothing.

i guess i am really fearful of not overcoming the latest (mostly mild) loss. i am noticing when i scan to read or to find something in the market that my processing is once again slower. i also think that the neuro changes push me further into depression.

my other concern is; are you able to lead a relatively normal life, despite the diagnosis? i have a strong desire to make a lasting change in the world. my latest plan, before the latest bad migraine, was to go on to study speech language pathology. (i'm sure i still have the capacity to do it, but i fear losing the capacity if these continue.)

also, any suggestions re: keppra and side effects of it? i want to avoid meds if at all possible.

books

> > > Taking a very good form of magnesium, such as magnesium glycinate, may help. I would seriously try the glycinate form, highly absorbable.
> >
> > Did you suggest this as a form of migraine prevention?
> >
> > When I remember to, I'm currently taking 5 cal-mag citrate (1875 mgs) daily. .)
> >
> > Is the citrate form not as absorbable, I wonder?
> >
>
>
> Hey, i have migraines and epilepsy, both. He is probably concerned about epilepsy as a possible cause because it is not uncommon to see persisting neurological deficits in epilepsy (it can happen in migraine, but is less frequent). The sleep apnea would be an issue, because some evidence suggests that migraine is at least partially related to poor oxygen metabolism in the mitochondria (which is why riboflavin is often recommended--it improves oxygen utilization there). Magnesium citrate and magnesium glycinate are roughly the same so far as bioavailability is concerned--but magnesium glycinate, as well as magnesium taurinate, may be superior because the glycine and taurine derived from these forms are both inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitters.
>
> Additionally, researchers at the university of colorado have found through MRI studies that the lower brain centers of migraineurs have crystalline iron deposits in them--so iron restiction may help, or may not. Curcuminoids, found in turmeric, chelate free iron and lead to kidney excretion, so in theory putting more turmeric (preferably in the form of curry, because the black pepper in curry dramatically increases absorption) *might* help, all though i know of no studies backing this.
>
> You mention that your neurological changes have gotten worse, the more you experience migraines--perhaps (if you have good insurance!) Keppra may be useful in that case, because it (more so than other AEDs used for migraine prophylaxis) has been shown to have a specific anti-kindling effect (i.e. it prevents and reverses the phenomenon of more attacks leading to increased frequency and severity in a vicious cycle).
>
> There is very little support for use of triptans as prophylactic drugs, and there is quite a bit of evidence for adverse vascular effects such as stroke and hypertension. They also exacerbate pre-existing seizure disorders. You may want to discuss risk/benefit ratio with your doc.
>
> I currently am using a combo of Lamictal and Keppra, for prophylaxis of seizures and migraine, as well as for "bipolar disorder due to a general medical condition" and when i experience the prodromal symptoms (the symptoms in the day(s) before the aura and actual attack) i take diltiazem CD (a calcium-channel blocker) to make sure my arteries stay dilated (the symptoms of migraine are due to spasm of arteries and a resulting dilation of arterioles in an effort to force greater blood flow by creating a vacuum effect)... i only take the diltiazem during the prodromal period to make sure my body doesn't build a tolerance to it, because it most annoyingly does that quite easily to most drugs, more so than the average person.
>
> A rescue drug that has received relatively little attention, but has fairly good support, is an intravenous bolus of magnesium sulfate, 500-1000mg. You might wish to discuss that with your doc.
>
> Additionally, fish oils are sometimes useful, because of their anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic (nerve-nourishing) effects.
>
> Hope that helps some.
>
> ~AA

 

Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 10, 2003, at 23:01:35

In reply to Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!, posted by Angel1 on July 10, 2003, at 21:41:47

hmm. wonder if in the same dr's visit, i could bring up :

+ seeing an endo for my girl hormones.

+ possibly getting tested for sleep apnea.

+ getting an eeg in case my 'migraines' are part of epilepsy.

wouldn't make me sound like too much of a hypochondriac, now would it?

 

Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!

Posted by Ed O`Flaherty on July 11, 2003, at 16:16:04

In reply to Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!, posted by bookgurl99 on July 10, 2003, at 23:01:35

It looks like migraine here.Have you considered blocking ovulation e.g. by having a Mirena intra-uterine contraceptive coil fitted or by having Depo-Provera injections? The contraceptive pill may make migraine worse and is contraindicated if you get focal migraine where e.g. you lose the power of a limb.If that is not a problem consider taking the pill for 3 months without a break (omitting the dummy pills) and you will get only 4 attacks per year.

 

Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!

Posted by noa on July 11, 2003, at 19:41:21

In reply to Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!, posted by Ed O`Flaherty on July 11, 2003, at 16:16:04

I have a friend who has menstrual seizures. It was diagnosed as epilepsy, then the dx was changed to migraines, and then back to epilepsy again. But she definitely has many more seizures around her period.

 

Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes avid abulia

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 11, 2003, at 21:38:57

In reply to epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes, posted by avid abulia on July 10, 2003, at 11:59:14

> I currently am using a combo of Lamictal and Keppra, for prophylaxis of seizures and migraine, as well as for "bipolar disorder due to a general medical condition" and when i experience the prodromal symptoms (the symptoms in the day(s) before the aura and actual attack)

this combination of disorders sounds interesting, particularly because they sound - - familiar to my experience. two days before a severe (and remember, usually painles) 'migraine,' i become quite hypomanic. this has never been severe enough to earn me a dx of bipolar, but i wonder if the conditions are related -- if that is why the same medications work for all 3.

i am curious about how you got diagnosed and were able to pinpoint the 3 different disorders?

books

 

Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes bookgurl99

Posted by Dinah on July 12, 2003, at 17:44:56

In reply to Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes avid abulia, posted by bookgurl99 on July 11, 2003, at 21:38:57

Migraine has so many odd ways of expressing itself. I was really worried about my neurological functioning before I read "Migraine" by Oliver W. Sacks and realized that so many things that seemed so odd occurred around the same time as my migraines. I get migraines off and on for a period of time, maybe a couple of weeks. Then I have periods when nothing could trigger a migraine. It doesn't seem related to my menstrual cycle, but may be related to my cyclothymic mood cycle. I wonder if they have done any research on the connection between the three. At any rate, before the actual headaches start (and between headaches) solid objects seem insubstantial, everything seems a bit "off", and I describe things that had my therapist writing furiously in his notes. But I now think they're "just" migraine things, not temporal lobe epilepsy or anything more serious.

Who knows though...

 

Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes bookgurl99

Posted by avid abulia on July 12, 2003, at 21:55:58

In reply to Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes avid abulia, posted by bookgurl99 on July 11, 2003, at 21:38:57


> this combination of disorders sounds interesting, particularly because they sound - - familiar to my experience. two days before a severe (and remember, usually painles) 'migraine,' i become quite hypomanic. this has never been severe enough to earn me a dx of bipolar, but i wonder if the conditions are related -- if that is why the same medications work for all 3.
>
> i am curious about how you got diagnosed and were able to pinpoint the 3 different disorders?
>
> books


Huh! How did i get diagnosed?! Man, that would be a book on its own, there... long story short, i confused the hell out of loads of doctors and was referred to more and more highly respected experts, until finally i was seen by a guy from Syria, a guy from Laos, and a guy from California, *and somehow my insurance actually paid for all of them!* and together they figured it out... it took a lot of brain scans (if i ever see another MRI again... )

But yeah, it is speculated that all three disorders may be linked, at least in some people. There is pretty good evidence that they are, at least in some patients, disorders of the proteins that gate the entry of ions in and out of cells.

~AA

 

Re: epilepsy questions bookgurl99

Posted by avid abulia on July 12, 2003, at 22:13:47

In reply to Re: epilepsy questions, posted by bookgurl99 on July 10, 2003, at 22:45:39


> a question re: persistent neuro deficits in epilepsy; do you ever get some of these losses back? last year, when i had my 'severe migraine'/whatever, i became quite confused. (btw, this was accompanied with a severe headache.) however, within a few weeks i had 'most' of me back, except for a persistent shorter term memory and (to me) slightly slower processing. scans (ct and mri) and eeg, as you know, showed nothing.


The brain has remarkable healing capacities, whatever anyone else might try to tell you... and the more mentally active you stay, the more it helps. I've had some slight deficits (mainly in recognizing faces) that are slowly but surely improving. But the longer the damaging process goes on, the less likely total recovery becomes.

Inter-ictal EEGs (EEGs taken between seizures) are still normal in 50% of people with chronic seizure disorders... and unless you have brain surgery to implant leads deep in your brain, they can't "see" *everywhere* (just almost everywhere). So many epileptologists are starting to believe that consistent medical history coupled with a response to AEDs is more reliably indicative of epilepsy than an EEG, in some cases.

Keppra... well, it really depends on the person, but more so even than that, it depends on how long you are willing to tough it out if the initial fog is very bad for you. It is one of the more easily tolerated AEDs, it is not like Dopey-max or Tegretal in that it has a good chance of turning you into a drooling idiot (or at least someone who feels like one). For me, the main problem was short-term memory loss and drowsiness, but that has improved over the last month of being on a stable dose, and it continues to get easier every day.

Eh... one side effect i feel pretty ambivalent about is, it has made me lose weight. I am anorexic, so while i perceive it as a good thing, the rational parts of me say, "Dude! Your BMI is less than 16 right now, you better eat before you catch the fast train to Slab City, pal."

~AA

 

Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes Dinah

Posted by avid abulia on July 12, 2003, at 22:24:23

In reply to Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes bookgurl99, posted by Dinah on July 12, 2003, at 17:44:56

>It doesn't seem related to my menstrual cycle, but may be related to my cyclothymic mood cycle. I wonder if they have done any research on the connection between the three. At any rate, before the actual headaches start (and between headaches) solid objects seem insubstantial, everything seems a bit "off", and I describe things that had my therapist writing furiously in his notes. But I now think they're "just" migraine things, not temporal lobe epilepsy or anything more serious.
*****************************

Estrogenic hormones (estradiol, etc.) are calcium-channel blockers, so hormone fluctuations could well have an effect on any thing that is heavily influenced by ion-distribution... and *something* has to be messing with ion distribution if it ever turns out that that is involved in bipolar-spectrum disorders, so there are probably other factors involved... calcitonin and calcitonin-gene-regulating factor come to mind, just because those are some things that fall within my limited knowledge, and i am sure that other things, things that influence magnesium absorption, distribution, and excretion, probably could effect things in similar ways, as well as vanadium and vitamin C and vitamin E, but my knowledge of ion ATPases, ionophores, etc. is pretty rudimentary as i am not like a research scientist or anything, just a geek with too much time on my paws.

~AA

 

Dr. Ed--in all due respect...

Posted by avid abulia on July 12, 2003, at 22:44:29

In reply to Re: menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!, posted by Ed O`Flaherty on July 11, 2003, at 16:16:04

> It looks like migraine here.Have you considered blocking ovulation e.g. by having a Mirena intra-uterine contraceptive coil fitted or by having Depo-Provera injections? The contraceptive pill may make migraine worse and is contraindicated if you get focal migraine where e.g. you lose the power of a limb.If that is not a problem consider taking the pill for 3 months without a break (omitting the dummy pills) and you will get only 4 attacks per year.
****************************

I'm quite curious (and i'm quite aware it is totally irrelevant in my situation, but curiosity is my nature)... how do you know that 4 attacks will occur per year? What triggers those? Is it, like on the solstices and the equinoxes, or what? How do you know that hormonal therapy would not be even more effective, and help her even more in this instance?

Is that the advice you give all of your patients, do you tell them, do this, and you will get 4 attacks per year... and presto! Just as predicted, 4 attacks per year?

Because to me--bear with me, i'm a terrible thorn in peoples sides--it would seem like, while your advice is undoubtedly sound (you are a doctor, i am not, and i would completely bow to your advice with no questioning if this hadn't been so glaring to me)... you are not being very aware of the power of suggestion that doctors have over their patients.

While i am aware that this is a forum for medical treatments, the power of suggestion has power over physical ailments and ergo one could safely guess that there is some physical influence involved there... and while i am aware many people in positions of authority like doctors do not like to hear questions phrased like this, and i am totally at the mercy of yourself and the moderators to not be booted for this, which is not meant to be a heckle... I am still curious, and if there is a good physiological explanation for why it would be 4, and not "about 4," or "4 or less," i would be interested to hear it. If i am out of line by bringing such a concern up, please tell me and i will never again do such a thing.

~AA

 

Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect... avid abulia

Posted by Zenclearer on July 12, 2003, at 23:40:24

In reply to Dr. Ed--in all due respect..., posted by avid abulia on July 12, 2003, at 22:44:29

I am gussing that the 4 migraines per year result from the 4 intervals between taking the 3-month duration of BC pills (no dummies). That's: 3 into 12 months = 4.

> > It looks like migraine here.Have you considered blocking ovulation e.g. by having a Mirena intra-uterine contraceptive coil fitted or by having Depo-Provera injections? The contraceptive pill may make migraine worse and is contraindicated if you get focal migraine where e.g. you lose the power of a limb.If that is not a problem consider taking the pill for 3 months without a break (omitting the dummy pills) and you will get only 4 attacks per year.
> ****************************
>
> I'm quite curious (and i'm quite aware it is totally irrelevant in my situation, but curiosity is my nature)... how do you know that 4 attacks will occur per year? What triggers those? Is it, like on the solstices and the equinoxes, or what? How do you know that hormonal therapy would not be even more effective, and help her even more in this instance?
>
> Is that the advice you give all of your patients, do you tell them, do this, and you will get 4 attacks per year... and presto! Just as predicted, 4 attacks per year?
>
> Because to me--bear with me, i'm a terrible thorn in peoples sides--it would seem like, while your advice is undoubtedly sound (you are a doctor, i am not, and i would completely bow to your advice with no questioning if this hadn't been so glaring to me)... you are not being very aware of the power of suggestion that doctors have over their patients.
>
> While i am aware that this is a forum for medical treatments, the power of suggestion has power over physical ailments and ergo one could safely guess that there is some physical influence involved there... and while i am aware many people in positions of authority like doctors do not like to hear questions phrased like this, and i am totally at the mercy of yourself and the moderators to not be booted for this, which is not meant to be a heckle... I am still curious, and if there is a good physiological explanation for why it would be 4, and not "about 4," or "4 or less," i would be interested to hear it. If i am out of line by bringing such a concern up, please tell me and i will never again do such a thing.
>
> ~AA

 

Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect... Zenclearer

Posted by avid abulia on July 13, 2003, at 15:53:32

In reply to Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect... avid abulia, posted by Zenclearer on July 12, 2003, at 23:40:24

i must misread this then... I got the impression he was saying take a 3 month course, not take continuous three-month courses.


> I am gussing that the 4 migraines per year result from the 4 intervals between taking the 3-month duration of BC pills (no dummies). That's: 3 into 12 months = 4.
>
> > > It looks like migraine here.Have you considered blocking ovulation e.g. by having a Mirena intra-uterine contraceptive coil fitted or by having Depo-Provera injections? The contraceptive pill may make migraine worse and is contraindicated if you get focal migraine where e.g. you lose the power of a limb.If that is not a problem consider taking the pill for 3 months without a break (omitting the dummy pills) and you will get only 4 attacks per year.
> > ****************************
> >
> > I'm quite curious (and i'm quite aware it is totally irrelevant in my situation, but curiosity is my nature)... how do you know that 4 attacks will occur per year? What triggers those? Is it, like on the solstices and the equinoxes, or what? How do you know that hormonal therapy would not be even more effective, and help her even more in this instance?
> >
> > Is that the advice you give all of your patients, do you tell them, do this, and you will get 4 attacks per year... and presto! Just as predicted, 4 attacks per year?
> >
> > Because to me--bear with me, i'm a terrible thorn in peoples sides--it would seem like, while your advice is undoubtedly sound (you are a doctor, i am not, and i would completely bow to your advice with no questioning if this hadn't been so glaring to me)... you are not being very aware of the power of suggestion that doctors have over their patients.
> >
> > While i am aware that this is a forum for medical treatments, the power of suggestion has power over physical ailments and ergo one could safely guess that there is some physical influence involved there... and while i am aware many people in positions of authority like doctors do not like to hear questions phrased like this, and i am totally at the mercy of yourself and the moderators to not be booted for this, which is not meant to be a heckle... I am still curious, and if there is a good physiological explanation for why it would be 4, and not "about 4," or "4 or less," i would be interested to hear it. If i am out of line by bringing such a concern up, please tell me and i will never again do such a thing.
> >
> > ~AA
>
>

 

Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect...

Posted by Ed O`Flaherty on July 13, 2003, at 18:24:02

In reply to Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect... Zenclearer, posted by avid abulia on July 13, 2003, at 15:53:32

If you take the pill for 3 months at the time you will probably get a migraine attack only when you come off it for a break and so you will get 4 or 5 a year.Depo-Provera if you are lucky will give you no periods after a few injections (given 12 weeks apart) but the weight gain is often a problem.Mirena might work like that too but it does not suit everybody either.

 

Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes

Posted by Dinah on July 13, 2003, at 20:53:42

In reply to Re: epilepsy, migraine, Mg, permanent neuro changes Dinah, posted by avid abulia on July 12, 2003, at 22:24:23

I did some research today, and found that migraines also have a high comorbidity with essential tremor, as well as epilepsy and bipolar. My mother has familial tremor, which started when she was less than fifty and which really affects her ability to do anything with her hands. I see it's a dominant gene so I've got a fifty fifty chance of inheriting it. Something new to worry about.

On the other hand, she says she's never had a migraine, so perhaps there is no direct correlation.

 

Re: epilepsy questions avid abulia

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 13, 2003, at 23:19:06

In reply to Re: epilepsy questions bookgurl99, posted by avid abulia on July 12, 2003, at 22:13:47

> I've had some slight deficits (mainly in recognizing faces) that are slowly but surely improving. But the longer the damaging process goes on, the less likely total recovery becomes.
>

Yeah; last year I mostly had some visual deficits; scanning, facial recognition -- my brain would sort of 'insert' the wrong person's face from it's bank; then i'd look again and it'd be a different (the 'right') person! Like I said, I got most of it back -- to the point where some days I feel totally normal again. Only at times like now, since my last bad 'migraine' 2 weeks ago, do I have concerns. I hope you can get it all back.


Um . . can I run my last' migraine' past you; since you have both, maybe you can tell me whether to think of it as a 'seizure' or a migraine or both?

Ok -- for two days previous, I was very hyper. My attention span was somewhat low, but my friends said I seemed like my 'old' (before last year's weirdness) self. I felt pretty good, normal brain speed, everything.

Then, I started feeling dizzy out of the blue. Came home, sat down at the computer, and had a sudden balance change -- felt almost as though I 'were' moving, or were going to fall, -- jerked in the chair I was sitting in, clinging to the side to make sure I wouldn't fall. My friend visiting looked at me strangely, but I felt ok and brushed it off.

Next day, got up early, felt ok, went to work. During work became nauseated, had trouble concentrating, tense neck but no real pain, colors looking really bright and blurry left eye vision. Left work early. Rested rest of day.

Whole week after, felt sleepy. Wanted to sleep all the time, but couldn't due to work. Have had little initiative out of work; want to rest. Friends have complained about my low attention span. Have felt a little slow, unusually dumb. Now, two weeks later, my brain still feels slow. I don't recall where I just set something down, etc. things I would normally recall. I had some symptoms like this last year, and after some time they resolved. I hope these do too.

I'm still having many visual weirdnesses -- optical migraines -- and times where I feel slightly better or worse. Today the keyboard I type on at work was 'pulsating' in my vision.

So whad'ya think? Could someone really have a cognition-impairing 'seizure' without losing consciousness? Or am I just having the mother of all migraine disorders?

p.s. i know you're not a dr. _and_ i'm gonna go to my dr. on tue and play dumb; i'm gonna say i keep having these funny migraines.

 

Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect...

Posted by AnneL on July 14, 2003, at 9:45:10

In reply to Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect..., posted by Ed O`Flaherty on July 13, 2003, at 18:24:02

> If you take the pill for 3 months at the time you will probably get a migraine attack only when you come off it for a break and so you will get 4 or 5 a year.Depo-Provera if you are lucky will give you no periods after a few injections (given 12 weeks apart) but the weight gain is often a problem.Mirena might work like that too but it does not suit everybody either.
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<Many women with mood disorders need to be careful when using hormonal contraceptives, particularly those that contain synthetic progestins contained in Depo-Provera and in the Mirena intrauterine device. Synthetic progestins are well-known to exacerbate existing mood disorders or to cause depression in women who have not been previously diagnosed with depression and/or other mood disorders. Yes, hormonal suppression of ovulation can help with a specific type of hormonally mediated migraine pattern, but caution is advised in those whom already suffer from a mood disorder. :) AnneL

 

Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect...

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 14, 2003, at 10:17:29

In reply to Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect..., posted by AnneL on July 14, 2003, at 9:45:10

>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<Many women with mood disorders need to be careful when using hormonal contraceptives, particularly those that contain synthetic progestins contained in Depo-Provera and in the Mirena intrauterine device.

Yes, but Ed was giving the advice to _me_, and I have not been dx'd with a mood disorder.

I would hate to see people stop giving suggestions on this board because everyone jumps on them and says -- but that suggestion wouldn't work for MEEEEEeee because of THIS.

books


 

Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect... Ed O`Flaherty

Posted by avid abulia on July 14, 2003, at 22:16:11

In reply to Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect..., posted by Ed O`Flaherty on July 13, 2003, at 18:24:02

> If you take the pill for 3 months at the time you will probably get a migraine attack only when you come off it for a break and so you will get 4 or 5 a year.Depo-Provera if you are lucky will give you no periods after a few injections (given 12 weeks apart) but the weight gain is often a problem.Mirena might work like that too but it does not suit everybody either.

ah, thanks for clearing that up! :-)

 

Re: epilepsy questions bookgurl99

Posted by avid abulia on July 14, 2003, at 22:21:34

In reply to Re: epilepsy questions avid abulia, posted by bookgurl99 on July 13, 2003, at 23:19:06

>
>
> Um . . can I run my last' migraine' past you; since you have both, maybe you can tell me whether to think of it as a 'seizure' or a migraine or both?
>
> Ok -- for two days previous, I was very hyper. My attention span was somewhat low, but my friends said I seemed like my 'old' (before last year's weirdness) self. I felt pretty good, normal brain speed, everything.
>
> Then, I started feeling dizzy out of the blue. Came home, sat down at the computer, and had a sudden balance change -- felt almost as though I 'were' moving, or were going to fall, -- jerked in the chair I was sitting in, clinging to the side to make sure I wouldn't fall. My friend visiting looked at me strangely, but I felt ok and brushed it off.
>
> Next day, got up early, felt ok, went to work. During work became nauseated, had trouble concentrating, tense neck but no real pain, colors looking really bright and blurry left eye vision. Left work early. Rested rest of day.
>
> Whole week after, felt sleepy. Wanted to sleep all the time, but couldn't due to work. Have had little initiative out of work; want to rest. Friends have complained about my low attention span. Have felt a little slow, unusually dumb. Now, two weeks later, my brain still feels slow. I don't recall where I just set something down, etc. things I would normally recall. I had some symptoms like this last year, and after some time they resolved. I hope these do too.
>
> I'm still having many visual weirdnesses -- optical migraines -- and times where I feel slightly better or worse. Today the keyboard I type on at work was 'pulsating' in my vision.
>
> So whad'ya think? Could someone really have a cognition-impairing 'seizure' without losing consciousness? Or am I just having the mother of all migraine disorders?
>
> p.s. i know you're not a dr. _and_ i'm gonna go to my dr. on tue and play dumb; i'm gonna say i keep having these funny migraines.
>


I dunno... to me, it all sounds like migraine stuff. That doesn't seem much like anything *i've* experienced with epilepsy, but epilepsy, like migraine, is a complex phenomenon and everyone is different. i don't think it is usual to have that stuff that starts to happen a few days in advance with epilepsy, but it is pretty normal for migraine.

 

Re: epilepsy questions

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 14, 2003, at 22:29:56

In reply to Re: epilepsy questions bookgurl99, posted by avid abulia on July 14, 2003, at 22:21:34

hey avid,

thx for your response. yes, from what i've recently read about migraine/epilepsy, migraine is more likely to have these long weirdnesses, whereas with ep. they're short-term.

books

 

Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect...

Posted by stjames on July 15, 2003, at 16:36:09

In reply to Re: Dr. Ed--in all due respect..., posted by bookgurl99 on July 14, 2003, at 10:17:29

> >> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<Many women with mood disorders need to be careful when using hormonal contraceptives, particularly those that contain synthetic progestins contained in Depo-Provera and in the Mirena intrauterine device.
>
> Yes, but Ed was giving the advice to _me_, and I have not been dx'd with a mood disorder.

You missed this part:

or to cause depression in women who have not been previously diagnosed with depression and/or other mood disorders

 

the verdict

Posted by bookgurl99 on July 15, 2003, at 22:06:27

In reply to menstrual migraines or epilepsy? so frustrated!, posted by bookgurl99 on July 8, 2003, at 13:15:35

Went to the dr. today; we discussed the whole case history.

He determined that I have classic symptoms of Familial Hemiplegic Migraine, or Basal Artery Migraine. He basically said that prevention _is_ the treatment.

I believe him, and was glad that he understands the mechanism whereby these 'migraines' cause damage.

He suggested depakote for treatment. I asked for effexor, which I'm trying at the fairly low dose of 75 mgs.

Anyone got experiences on depakote? Is it really not so bad? I'm nervous about the liver damage, blood testing stuff.

Thanks so much to everyone, especially aa, for spending so much time on helping me out with this.

I'm open to any suggestions for how to get a handle on this.


This is the end of the thread.


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Medication | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

Script revised: February 4, 2008
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-17 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.