Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 214008

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Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY? Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 5:30:23

In reply to Re: magnesium, sleeping beardedlady, posted by Larry Hoover on April 6, 2003, at 17:37:46

Hi Larry

Well, after trying and trying to find a suitable form of magnesium I have decided to try good old magnesium chloride as this is arguably THE most bio-available source of magnesium on the available. Magnesium glycinate is very difficult to find in health food stores and the mail order over the internet was my only real option for this substance....but I'm after the magnesium and magnesium glycinate turns out to be a LOT more expensive than magnesium chloride.

However do you know that it is almost impossible to find pure magnesium chloride in health food stores and when you do it's horribly expensive and usually mixed in with other less healthy forms of magnesium. As for the magnesium amino acid chelates trying to get the information as to EXACTLY what the binding amino acid is in this form from the Vitamin Companies is like trying to get the Pentagon's or the CIA's most top secret plans because they think your going to sell their trade secrets to the Chinese or the North Koreans. I suspect they don't want to tell me because they probably use whatever binding amino acid is available and cheap at the time and it probably even varies from batch to batch or may even be a mixture of of different amino acids. Like you told me in another post purchasing magnesium amino acid chelate is like a crap shoot.....you might get glycine but you might also get glutamine or taurine as the binding agent. Which George eby says to avoid.

Then I came across this link on magnesium chloride on the net http://www.mrbean.net.au/~wlast/magnesiumchloride.html
If you click on the link titled "Resources" it brings you to the following link http://www.mrbean.net.au/~wlast/resources.html
This link provided all my answers as to where I could get my supply of pure magnesium chloride.....NOT from health food stores but from chemical suppliers and agricultural suppliers. Now the link says that technical grade Magnesium chloride is absolutely fine. After a few phone calls to a few Pharmaceutical companies I discovered that to make sure it's really safe to consume you should purchase BP grade chemicals which apparently means pharmaceutacial grade. I then called up some chemical companies and yes they did sell BP grade Magnesium Chloride but the minimum purchase I could make was a 25kg bag but it only costs $8.00 Australian dollars per kilo. Now this is seriously cheap for a food supplement but I really don't know what I'd do with 25kg of the stuff. Then I struck pay dirt and one company was kind enough to actually give me the telephone number of a smaller chemical lab who they supplied and this smaller lab on sold it in consumer quantities. It's a little more expensive but I now have in my possession one 500g tub of BP grade Magnesium Chloride flakes for $14.00 Australian dollars. This is still pretty cheap.

FINALLY I get to my question for you Larry.

How much of this substance should I take? In other words how many grams of magnesium are actually contained in my 500g tub of magnesium chloride flakes?

So far I have taken one heaped teaspoon in water.It looks and tastes just like table salt and dissolves VERY easily in a glass of water. I then add some cordial as a sweetener to mask the saltiness and drink it down. How much magnesium do you estimate I took in my one heaped teaspoon?

Thanks for your help Larry?

regards
bluedog

 

Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY? bluedog

Posted by jodeye on April 9, 2003, at 12:21:34

In reply to Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY? Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 5:30:23


> How much of this substance should I take? In other words how many grams of magnesium are actually contained in my 500g tub of magnesium chloride flakes?
>

bluedog,

I have found that the chemical supply houses supply two forms of magnesium chloride.

1) Anhydrous magnesium chloride, (anhydrous).
2) Magnesium chloride hexahydrate, (hydrate).

The hydrate is much more stable and contains six water molecules. Of the three chemical supply houses that I contacted, their product listed as just magnesium chloride, is actually the hydrate form. Anhydrous is close to 26 percent elemental magnesium by weight. The hydrate is close to 12 percent elemental magnesium by weight.

What I do is add the 500g hydrate to a quart jar and then fill it to one quart with water.

According to my math...

1) One quart contains 192 teaspoons.
2) 500g hydrate contains 60,000 mg elemental mag, (500,000 times 0.12).
3) One teaspoon of the mixture equals 312 mg elemental magnesium, (60,000 divided by 192).

Then I just add a teaspoon of this mixture to a shot of water. Bottoms up!

Aloha,

--jodeye

 

Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY?

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 9, 2003, at 12:43:30

In reply to Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY? Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 5:30:23

> Hi Larry

I'll snip to the core issues.

>Now the link says that technical grade Magnesium chloride is absolutely fine. After a few phone calls to a few Pharmaceutical companies I discovered that to make sure it's really safe to consume you should purchase BP grade chemicals which apparently means pharmaceutacial grade. I then called up some chemical companies and yes they did sell BP grade Magnesium Chloride but the minimum purchase I could make was a 25kg bag but it only costs $8.00 Australian dollars per kilo. Now this is seriously cheap for a food supplement but I really don't know what I'd do with 25kg of the stuff. Then I struck pay dirt and one company was kind enough to actually give me the telephone number of a smaller chemical lab who they supplied and this smaller lab on sold it in consumer quantities. It's a little more expensive but I now have in my possession one 500g tub of BP grade Magnesium Chloride flakes for $14.00 Australian dollars. This is still pretty cheap.

Technical grade has higher levels of impurities. You don't want to take the risk of unknown contaminants, IMHO.

> FINALLY I get to my question for you Larry.
>
> How much of this substance should I take? In other words how many grams of magnesium are actually contained in my 500g tub of magnesium chloride flakes?

Well, it depends on the actual form of the crystals. It could be Mg(Cl)2, or it could be the hexahydrate Mg(Cl)2.6(H20).

The molecular weight of the former is 95.21, of which 25.5% is elemental magnesium. So, you've got 125 grams, more or less.

In the second case, the weight of the water of hydration has to be considered, and it's 12% magnesium by weight, yielding about 60 grams elemental Mg.

> So far I have taken one heaped teaspoon in water.It looks and tastes just like table salt and dissolves VERY easily in a glass of water. I then add some cordial as a sweetener to mask the saltiness and drink it down. How much magnesium do you estimate I took in my one heaped teaspoon?

A teaspoon is a volume measurement. The only way to know how much magnesium is in a teaspoon is to develop some sort of relationship between mass and volume. Two ways: weigh a teaspoonful, in miligrams, and use the percentages I found above, or take the volume of the whole container in mL, and work it out per teaspoonful (assuming 5 mL per *level* teaspoonful).

> Thanks for your help Larry?
>
> regards
> bluedog

You're welcome.

Lar

 

Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY?

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 9, 2003, at 12:51:08

In reply to Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY? bluedog, posted by jodeye on April 9, 2003, at 12:21:34

> What I do is add the 500g hydrate to a quart jar and then fill it to one quart with water.

Excellent solution! (pun intended)

> According to my math...
>
> 1) One quart contains 192 teaspoons.

Assuming an American quart of 32 ounces. The (ahem) civilised world uses a 40 oz. quart.

> 2) 500g hydrate contains 60,000 mg elemental mag, (500,000 times 0.12).
> 3) One teaspoon of the mixture equals 312 mg elemental magnesium, (60,000 divided by 192).
>
> Then I just add a teaspoon of this mixture to a shot of water. Bottoms up!
>
> Aloha,
>
> --jodeye

Well done!

Lar

 

Re: Thankyou, Jodeye jodeye

Posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 12:57:33

In reply to Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY? bluedog, posted by jodeye on April 9, 2003, at 12:21:34

>
> > How much of this substance should I take? In other words how many grams of magnesium are actually contained in my 500g tub of magnesium chloride flakes?
> >
>
> bluedog,
>
> I have found that the chemical supply houses supply two forms of magnesium chloride.
>
> 1) Anhydrous magnesium chloride, (anhydrous).
> 2) Magnesium chloride hexahydrate, (hydrate).
>
> The hydrate is much more stable and contains six water molecules. Of the three chemical supply houses that I contacted, their product listed as just magnesium chloride, is actually the hydrate form. Anhydrous is close to 26 percent elemental magnesium by weight. The hydrate is close to 12 percent elemental magnesium by weight.
>
> What I do is add the 500g hydrate to a quart jar and then fill it to one quart with water.
>
> According to my math...
>
> 1) One quart contains 192 teaspoons.
> 2) 500g hydrate contains 60,000 mg elemental mag, (500,000 times 0.12).
> 3) One teaspoon of the mixture equals 312 mg elemental magnesium, (60,000 divided by 192).
>
> Then I just add a teaspoon of this mixture to a shot of water. Bottoms up!
>
> Aloha,
>
> --jodeye
>

Jodeye

Thanks for the information. I have just one question as I am not familiar with what a quart is as my feeble brain can only cope with purely metric/decimal measures

Would you be able to tell me how many ml (or litres) there is in a quart?

I will ring up my supplier tommorrow to find out whether the mag chlor I purchased is hydrate or anhydrate but from what your telling me my guess is it's probably the hydrated form.

From your calculations I suspect that my my heaped teaspoon of the crystals that I dissolved in water contained more magnesium than 312mg (my guess is probably between 600-900mg) because I did experience what you would term a mild laxative effect. I've never experienced this before as the most elemental magnesium I've ever taken at once is probably around 200mg. So I probably need to spread out the dose that I took over two or three smaller doses in a 24 hour period because 600-900mg all at once was probably more than my is body is used to.

cheers
bluedog

 

Re: Thank you Larry as well Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 13:05:08

In reply to Re: Magnesium Chloride - some questions LARRY?, posted by Larry Hoover on April 9, 2003, at 12:43:30

> >Now the link says that technical grade Magnesium chloride is absolutely fine. After a few phone calls to a few Pharmaceutical companies I discovered that to make sure it's really safe to consume you should purchase BP grade chemicals which apparently means pharmaceutacial grade. I then called up some chemical companies and yes they did sell BP grade Magnesium Chloride but the minimum purchase I could make was a 25kg bag but it only costs $8.00 Australian dollars per kilo. Now this is seriously cheap for a food supplement but I really don't know what I'd do with 25kg of the stuff. Then I struck pay dirt and one company was kind enough to actually give me the telephone number of a smaller chemical lab who they supplied and this smaller lab on sold it in consumer quantities. It's a little more expensive but I now have in my possession one 500g tub of BP grade Magnesium Chloride flakes for $14.00 Australian dollars. This is still pretty cheap.
>
> Technical grade has higher levels of impurities. You don't want to take the risk of unknown contaminants, IMHO.
>


Thanks Larry

I actually thanked Jodeye before your response appeared on the radar.

So have I done the right thing in going for BP grade Mag Chlor? Apparently the BP stands for British Pharmaceutical....is this correct?

regards
bluedog

 

Re. Quarts and ounces ??? - Larry and Jodeye

Posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 13:32:57

In reply to Re: Thank you Larry as well Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 13:05:08

A quart equals 32 oz or 40 oz?

Looking at both your responses I assume you are both referring to the (allegedly uncivilized) version of 32 oz as equalling a quart.

Larry , I beg to differ. In the TRULY civilized world we refer to mililitres and litres not to quarts and ounces

If you could tell me how many ml or litres there are in a a quart (either the 32oz version or the 40 oz version) I can then work it out further on my own :)

thanks
bluedog

 

Re: Re. Quarts and ounces ??? - Larry and Jodeye

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 9, 2003, at 14:47:53

In reply to Re. Quarts and ounces ??? - Larry and Jodeye, posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 13:32:57

> A quart equals 32 oz or 40 oz?

Both. You just need to know which one *you're* using.

> Looking at both your responses I assume you are both referring to the (allegedly uncivilized) version of 32 oz as equalling a quart.

> Larry , I beg to differ. In the TRULY civilized world we refer to mililitres and litres not to quarts and ounces

Touche.

> If you could tell me how many ml or litres there are in a a quart (either the 32oz version or the 40 oz version) I can then work it out further on my own :)
>
> thanks
> bluedog

One litre is about 35.2 ounces.

 

Now I am confused! - Bluedog

Posted by jodeye on April 9, 2003, at 16:48:14

In reply to Re. Quarts and ounces ??? - Larry and Jodeye, posted by bluedog on April 9, 2003, at 13:32:57

Hi,

You were measuring your doses in rounded teaspoons, now mixing in metric, the math gets more involved.

Actually, my Dr. told me I could mix it anyway I like, without knowing the milligrams, since I am trying to consume maximum magnesium without causing laxative effect, however much that may be. I just need to be sure to mix it the same way each time.

Aloha,

--jodeye


 

JLx

Posted by McPac on April 9, 2003, at 17:02:36

In reply to Re: To johnj: exercise and sleep johnj, posted by JLx on April 8, 2003, at 21:12:32

Didn't you go through the nasty withdrawal when you stopped taking your Zoloft cold turkey?

 

Re: JLx McPac

Posted by JLx on April 9, 2003, at 17:12:49

In reply to JLx, posted by McPac on April 9, 2003, at 17:02:36

> Didn't you go through the nasty withdrawal when you stopped taking your Zoloft cold turkey?

I think I answered this before. I did have some shortness of breath and a tightness sort of feeling in my chest the first day off, but I went for a long walk and felt better afterwards, so I guess the short answer is "no". I've gone off and on Zoloft several times without incident.

 

Re: Now I am confused! - Bluedog jodeye

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 12:26:07

In reply to Now I am confused! - Bluedog, posted by jodeye on April 9, 2003, at 16:48:14

> Hi,
>
> You were measuring your doses in rounded teaspoons, now mixing in metric, the math gets more involved.

Actually, getting away from imperial measure vastly simplifies the math. Everything's decimal, as contrasted to three teaspoons in a tablespoon, two tablespoons in an ounce, 32 (or 40) ounces in a quart, etc.

For example: Dissolving the 500 grams of Mg chloride hexahydrate in one liter of water gives you a solution of 60 grams of Mg in 1000 mL of water (determined in previous posts). To get a particular mass of Mg, you solve for a volume in mL. To get 0.5 grams Mg (500 mg), you set up a ratio like this:

1000 mL/ 60 grams = X mL/ 0.5 grams

Rearrangement gives : X mL = (1000 mL)(0.5)/60 (the grams cancel out)

= 8.33 mL

You can get graduated "spoons" measured in mL at any pharmacy, as pediatric medication is often in a liquid form, permitting dosing by body mass.

Setting up the ratio a little differently allows you to figure out how much Mg is in a specific volume. A standard teaspoon is 5 mL.

> Actually, my Dr. told me I could mix it anyway I like, without knowing the milligrams, since I am trying to consume maximum magnesium without causing laxative effect, however much that may be. I just need to be sure to mix it the same way each time.

> Aloha,
>
> --jodeye
>
>
>

 

Re: Thanks Larry - some questions on spec sheets? Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 12:40:18

In reply to Re: Now I am confused! - Bluedog jodeye, posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 12:26:07

Hi Larry

The following links provide the grade specs analysis for two forms of Magnesium Chloride I can purchase from a supplier in my city.

1. http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html

2. http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html

The second product is slightly more expensive than the first product but they are made by the same company and the supplier in my city can supply either of these products in 500g size.

The next size up is unfortunately 5kg which of course would make it more economical but I don't know how long you could store these products before they go off (if this actually happens at all) and I think it would take me a long time to use up 5kg.

Unfortunately, these specs go way above my chemical knowledge so I'd like to ask you whether you would consider either of these products as suitable for human consumption based on the spec sheet analysis of these products?

If your answer is yes which one would you recommend I purchase?

Thanks in advance Larry

regards
bluedog

 

Re: Larry something went wrong in those links

Posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 12:55:49

In reply to Re: Thanks Larry - some questions on spec sheets? Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 12:40:18

Sorry about that but the following link http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html brings you to a page where there is another link on a tab called "products" and when you get to that page then the product codes I'm looking at are as follows.

296-500g and 297-500g

Alternatively (and more simply) you can simply type in magnesium chloride and it will give you links to the products listed under the trade names of Univar and Unilab with another tab called info sheet at each separate product page which gives you the analytical tech sheets.

Sorry about the bother Larry

Regards
bluedog

 

Re: Thanks Larry - some questions on spec sheets?

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 13:19:24

In reply to Re: Thanks Larry - some questions on spec sheets? Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 12:40:18

> Hi Larry
>
> The following links provide the grade specs analysis for two forms of Magnesium Chloride I can purchase from a supplier in my city.
>
> 1. http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html
>
> 2. http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html

The links didn't work, but I presume that they relate to Univar and Unilab grade mag chloride, respectively?

> The second product is slightly more expensive than the first product but they are made by the same company and the supplier in my city can supply either of these products in 500g size.

Given that they state that Unilab grade meets BP standards, I'd go with the more expensive one.

> The next size up is unfortunately 5kg which of course would make it more economical but I don't know how long you could store these products before they go off (if this actually happens at all) and I think it would take me a long time to use up 5kg.

They would be expected to have an indefinite shelf life. There's nothing that can happen if you keep it dry. I'd presume that both the 500 mg and 5 kg containers would be plastic with screw tops. That would be fine.

> Unfortunately, these specs go way above my chemical knowledge so I'd like to ask you whether you would consider either of these products as suitable for human consumption based on the spec sheet analysis of these products?
>
> If your answer is yes which one would you recommend I purchase?
>
> Thanks in advance Larry
>
> regards
> bluedog

The more expensive one.

Lar

 

Re: Thanks Larry - some questions on spec sheets? Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 13:56:41

In reply to Re: Thanks Larry - some questions on spec sheets?, posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 13:19:24

> > Hi Larry
> >
> > The following links provide the grade specs analysis for two forms of Magnesium Chloride I can purchase from a supplier in my city.
> >
> > 1. http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html
> >
> > 2. http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html
>
> The links didn't work, but I presume that they relate to Univar and Unilab grade mag chloride, respectively?
>
> > The second product is slightly more expensive than the first product but they are made by the same company and the supplier in my city can supply either of these products in 500g size.
>
> Given that they state that Unilab grade meets BP standards, I'd go with the more expensive one.
>
> > The next size up is unfortunately 5kg which of course would make it more economical but I don't know how long you could store these products before they go off (if this actually happens at all) and I think it would take me a long time to use up 5kg.
>
> They would be expected to have an indefinite shelf life. There's nothing that can happen if you keep it dry. I'd presume that both the 500 mg and 5 kg containers would be plastic with screw tops. That would be fine.
>
> > Unfortunately, these specs go way above my chemical knowledge so I'd like to ask you whether you would consider either of these products as suitable for human consumption based on the spec sheet analysis of these products?
> >
> > If your answer is yes which one would you recommend I purchase?
> >
> > Thanks in advance Larry
> >
> > regards
> > bluedog
>
> The more expensive one.
>
> Lar

Thanks Larry

Believe it or not the Unilab British Pharmacopoeia (BP) grade Magnesium Chloride is actually the cheaper of the two products.

The Univar Magnesium Chloride (the more expensive one)conforms to to both American Chemical Society standards (ACS) and Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) standard which is apparently the standard required for a chemical to be allowed to be added to food in Australia.

In light of the above would you still recommend I go for the more expensive one. (It costs about $8.00 Australian Dollars more for the 500g pack of the more expensive Univar product.

I know I'm being paranoid but I assume that all these standards mean that these chemicals are quite pure and fit for human consumption....Right???????

thanks again Larry

regards
bluedog

 

Re: Larry something went wrong in those links

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 14:02:39

In reply to Re: Larry something went wrong in those links, posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 12:55:49

> Sorry about that but the following link http://www.ajaxfinechem.com/products/products.html brings you to a page where there is another link on a tab called "products" and when you get to that page then the product codes I'm looking at are as follows.
>
> 296-500g and 297-500g
>
> Alternatively (and more simply) you can simply type in magnesium chloride and it will give you links to the products listed under the trade names of Univar and Unilab with another tab called info sheet at each separate product page which gives you the analytical tech sheets.
>
> Sorry about the bother Larry
>
> Regards
> bluedog

I said Unilab on the last message, when I meant Univar. In the top section of the analytical report, it lists purity at 99-100.5%. The other one is 98-101%. If the cost difference is small, go with the purer stuff. I don't think you have anything to fear, even with the less pure product.

Lar

 

Thanks Larry and Goodnight, I'm Off to bed now:) (nm) Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 14:24:48

In reply to Re: Larry something went wrong in those links, posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 14:02:39

 

Re: Thanks Larry bluedog

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 14:53:44

In reply to Thanks Larry and Goodnight, I'm Off to bed now:) (nm) Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 10, 2003, at 14:24:48

Just a bit about seeking out the highest quality of supplements (where evidence for such is available)....

You're not contemplating a one-time exposure to the supplement, you're contemplating a recurrent exposure to the same material. If there was to be any adverse effect, the most likely would arise from cumulative exposure to some impurity. So, the higher the standard of purity, the safer you are.

Lar

 

Re: Is my Maths correct? Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 11, 2003, at 5:23:45

In reply to Re: Thanks Larry bluedog, posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 14:53:44

> Just a bit about seeking out the highest quality of supplements (where evidence for such is available)....
>
> You're not contemplating a one-time exposure to the supplement, you're contemplating a recurrent exposure to the same material. If there was to be any adverse effect, the most likely would arise from cumulative exposure to some impurity. So, the higher the standard of purity, the safer you are.
>
> Lar


Hi Larry

I ended up buying the cheaper of the two substances because the supplier only had a 500g quantity avaialable of the (slightly) less pure substance in my city. However I contacted the companies head office and they assured me that the BP grade I purchased was actually Pharmaceutical grade AND food grade and was in fact pure enough to feed intravenously to hospital patients. The company actually pointed out to me that the BP grade Mag Chlor I was purchasing would in all probability be purer than the tap water I drink each day with regard to trace element contaminants so I felt safe purchasing the BP grade Mag Chlor.


If my magnesium trial with the 500g pack works out well for my health and overall vitality, I will then order a 5kg tub of the (slightly) purer product next time round.

Now for my maths...please correct me if I am wrong.

Firstly To prevent the laxative effect kicking in I wish to start out conservatively and take only 150mg of elemental Mg in each separate dose.

1. My 500g tub of MgCL26H20 contains 400x150mg doses of elemental magnesium...Right?????

Secondly I just so happen to have a 20ml measuring cup at home (came with a cough mixture I once purchased). So rearranging your formula around I calculate the following:_

2. If I dissolve 62.5g of my Mag Chlor in 1000ml of water I will get 150mg of elemental Mg in every 20ml dose....Right????

This is the easiest way I can think of with the resources I currently have at home of getting a fairly accurate 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. (I'm not particularly worried about a few mg more or less each way).

3. Please correct me if I'm wrong :) :). My maths has definitely slipped over the years...what you don't use you lose...Right?????

Thanks Larry

regards
bluedog


 

Re: Is my Maths correct? bluedog

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 11, 2003, at 9:11:37

In reply to Re: Is my Maths correct? Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 11, 2003, at 5:23:45

> Hi Larry
>
> I ended up buying the cheaper of the two substances because the supplier only had a 500g quantity avaialable of the (slightly) less pure substance in my city. However I contacted the companies head office and they assured me that the BP grade I purchased was actually Pharmaceutical grade AND food grade and was in fact pure enough to feed intravenously to hospital patients. The company actually pointed out to me that the BP grade Mag Chlor I was purchasing would in all probability be purer than the tap water I drink each day with regard to trace element contaminants so I felt safe purchasing the BP grade Mag Chlor.

Sounds all right to me, too. <grin>

> If my magnesium trial with the 500g pack works out well for my health and overall vitality, I will then order a 5kg tub of the (slightly) purer product next time round.

If the stuff is IV grade, you can probably save the extra cost.

> Now for my maths...please correct me if I am wrong.

'kay

> Firstly To prevent the laxative effect kicking in I wish to start out conservatively and take only 150mg of elemental Mg in each separate dose.
>
> 1. My 500g tub of MgCL26H20 contains 400x150mg doses of elemental magnesium...Right?????

Right.

> Secondly I just so happen to have a 20ml measuring cup at home (came with a cough mixture I once purchased).

Is it just marked at 20 mL, or does it have other graduations?

>So rearranging your formula around I calculate the following:_
>
> 2. If I dissolve 62.5g of my Mag Chlor in 1000ml of water I will get 150mg of elemental Mg in every 20ml dose....Right????

Yes, but....how do you propose to measure out 62.5 mg?

Alternatively, and using the ratio method, I've calculated that to get 150 mg Mg, from the whole lot dissolved in one litre, you'd need to take 2.5 mL, or 1/2 teaspoon. A baking measure will do fine.

> This is the easiest way I can think of with the resources I currently have at home of getting a fairly accurate 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. (I'm not particularly worried about a few mg more or less each way).

Your method depends on determining the right mass of Mg(Cl)2 in the first place.

> 3. Please correct me if I'm wrong :) :). My maths has definitely slipped over the years...what you don't use you lose...Right?????

That's why we invented calculators, non?

> Thanks Larry
>
> regards
> bluedog

Welcome.

Lar

 

Re: Is my Maths correct? Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 11, 2003, at 12:20:20

In reply to Re: Is my Maths correct? bluedog, posted by Larry Hoover on April 11, 2003, at 9:11:37

> > Hi Larry
> >
> > I ended up buying the cheaper of the two substances because the supplier only had a 500g quantity avaialable of the (slightly) less pure substance in my city. However I contacted the companies head office and they assured me that the BP grade I purchased was actually Pharmaceutical grade AND food grade and was in fact pure enough to feed intravenously to hospital patients. The company actually pointed out to me that the BP grade Mag Chlor I was purchasing would in all probability be purer than the tap water I drink each day with regard to trace element contaminants so I felt safe purchasing the BP grade Mag Chlor.
>
> Sounds all right to me, too. <grin>
>
> > If my magnesium trial with the 500g pack works out well for my health and overall vitality, I will then order a 5kg tub of the (slightly) purer product next time round.
>
> If the stuff is IV grade, you can probably save the extra cost.
>
> > Now for my maths...please correct me if I am wrong.
>
> 'kay
>
> > Firstly To prevent the laxative effect kicking in I wish to start out conservatively and take only 150mg of elemental Mg in each separate dose.
> >
> > 1. My 500g tub of MgCL26H20 contains 400x150mg doses of elemental magnesium...Right?????
>
> Right.
>
> > Secondly I just so happen to have a 20ml measuring cup at home (came with a cough mixture I once purchased).
>
> Is it just marked at 20 mL, or does it have other graduations?


It only has one other graduation at 1ml


>
> >So rearranging your formula around I calculate the following:_
> >
> > 2. If I dissolve 62.5g of my Mag Chlor in 1000ml of water I will get 150mg of elemental Mg in every 20ml dose....Right????
>
> Yes, but....how do you propose to measure out 62.5 mg?
>


Good point, I just checked out my kitchen scales and it would be rather difficult to measure out 62.5mg accurately. However doubling the amount to 125mg would be easier to measure out give or take a few grams but effectively doubling the strength of each 20ml dose to 300mg elemental Mg.


> Alternatively, and using the ratio method, I've calculated that to get 150 mg Mg, from the whole lot dissolved in one litre, you'd need to take 2.5 mL, or 1/2 teaspoon. A baking measure will do fine.


I can see your point, it would probably be a lot easier to buy a really cheap measuring cup with more graduations including 2.5ml, 5ml, 10ml etc to make things a little easier for me, or one of those sucky thingy's (I don't even know what you call them) with 0.5ml graduations) and to dissolve the whole 500g tub of my Mag Chlor into one litre of water.....Right?????


>
> > This is the easiest way I can think of with the resources I currently have at home of getting a fairly accurate 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. (I'm not particularly worried about a few mg more or less each way).
>
> Your method depends on determining the right mass of Mg(Cl)2 in the first place.


Your method sounds easier...just dissolve the whole tub into a one litre bottle or jar and then just use 2.5ml at a time to get my 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. Would it be necessary or desirable to to keep this bottle in the fridge or is room temp storage OK?


>
> > 3. Please correct me if I'm wrong :) :). My maths has definitely slipped over the years...what you don't use you lose...Right?????
>
> That's why we invented calculators, non?
>


I did use a calculator but I initially had completely forgotton how to re-arrange equations but once I practiced a bit it all came back to me and I finally got there and this is the equation I came up with working with my limited measuring ability of only a 20ml measuring cup:-

Xml=(60g)(20ml)/0.15

However this gave me a completely ludicrous situation where I would need to dissolve my 500g tub in 8 litres of water to get my desired result. To make it less wieldy and to make smaller one litre lots I simply divided 500g by 8 to get my 62.5mg of Mag Chlor to get the desired results.

So all in all your original equation ends up being a lot more helpful to me:) :). In other words

Xml = (1000ml)(0.5)/60g

but I have simply replaced the 0.5 you used as an example with my target strength of 0.15 to get my intended dose of 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. You only need vary the 0.5 to 0.15 or 0.3 or 0.5 etc to get the ml you require for a particular dose strength of elemental Mg.

And applying this equation 2.5ml of the whole 500g tub dissolved in one litre does indeed give me a 150mg dose of elemental Mg (give or take a few mg either way due to my equipment not being lab quality accuracy) but it's good enough for my purposes. I can't argue with the experts:) :).

Thanks again Larry

regards
bluedog

 

Re: Is my Maths correct?

Posted by Larry Hoover on April 11, 2003, at 14:10:27

In reply to Re: Is my Maths correct? Larry Hoover, posted by bluedog on April 11, 2003, at 12:20:20

> > > Secondly I just so happen to have a 20ml measuring cup at home (came with a cough mixture I once purchased).
> >
> > Is it just marked at 20 mL, or does it have other graduations?
>
>
> It only has one other graduation at 1ml

That's not overly useful. :-/

> >
> > >So rearranging your formula around I calculate the following:_
> > >
> > > 2. If I dissolve 62.5g of my Mag Chlor in 1000ml of water I will get 150mg of elemental Mg in every 20ml dose....Right????
> >
> > Yes, but....how do you propose to measure out 62.5 mg?
> >
>
>
> Good point, I just checked out my kitchen scales and it would be rather difficult to measure out 62.5mg accurately. However doubling the amount to 125mg would be easier to measure out give or take a few grams but effectively doubling the strength of each 20ml dose to 300mg elemental Mg.

You could also divide the 500 mg in half by volume. Just measure the whole thing in cups or whatever, and mix half of it with one litre of water. That would make 5 mL (one teaspoon) equal to 150 mg Mg.

> > Alternatively, and using the ratio method, I've calculated that to get 150 mg Mg, from the whole lot dissolved in one litre, you'd need to take 2.5 mL, or 1/2 teaspoon. A baking measure will do fine.
>
>
> I can see your point, it would probably be a lot easier to buy a really cheap measuring cup with more graduations including 2.5ml, 5ml, 10ml etc to make things a little easier for me, or one of those sucky thingy's (I don't even know what you call them) with 0.5ml graduations) and to dissolve the whole 500g tub of my Mag Chlor into one litre of water.....Right?????

It's the simplest thing to do, all things considered.

> >
> > > This is the easiest way I can think of with the resources I currently have at home of getting a fairly accurate 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. (I'm not particularly worried about a few mg more or less each way).
> >
> > Your method depends on determining the right mass of Mg(Cl)2 in the first place.
>
>
> Your method sounds easier...just dissolve the whole tub into a one litre bottle or jar and then just use 2.5ml at a time to get my 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. Would it be necessary or desirable to to keep this bottle in the fridge or is room temp storage OK?

I can't think of any reason to keep it refrigerated, but it wouldn't hurt anything to do so.

> >
> > > 3. Please correct me if I'm wrong :) :). My maths has definitely slipped over the years...what you don't use you lose...Right?????
> >
> > That's why we invented calculators, non?
> >
>
>
> I did use a calculator but I initially had completely forgotton how to re-arrange equations but once I practiced a bit it all came back to me and I finally got there and this is the equation I came up with working with my limited measuring ability of only a 20ml measuring cup:-
>
> Xml=(60g)(20ml)/0.15

To be rigorous, there would need to be a g after the 0.15. Your units must divide out as well. This is how you check to make sure you've got the ratio rearranged properly.

> However this gave me a completely ludicrous situation where I would need to dissolve my 500g tub in 8 litres of water to get my desired result. To make it less wieldy and to make smaller one litre lots I simply divided 500g by 8 to get my 62.5mg of Mag Chlor to get the desired results.

Now I understand better how you got to where you did.

> So all in all your original equation ends up being a lot more helpful to me:) :). In other words
>
> Xml = (1000ml)(0.5)/60g

Again, just for the people following along at home, there needs to be a "g" alongside the 0.5.

> but I have simply replaced the 0.5 you used as an example with my target strength of 0.15 to get my intended dose of 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. You only need vary the 0.5 to 0.15 or 0.3 or 0.5 etc to get the ml you require for a particular dose strength of elemental Mg.

That's exactly right. You answer the question: "How much volume of this solution do I need to supply a given mass of Mg?"

> And applying this equation 2.5ml of the whole 500g tub dissolved in one litre does indeed give me a 150mg dose of elemental Mg (give or take a few mg either way due to my equipment not being lab quality accuracy) but it's good enough for my purposes. I can't argue with the experts:) :).
>
> Thanks again Larry
>
> regards
> bluedog

You're welcome. You might want to consider the alternative I mentioned at the top.....divide the volume in half, and mix one of those halves into one litre. That gives you a more manageable volume/mass relationship of 5 mL to 150 mg Mg.

Lar

 

Re: Is my Maths correct? Larry Hoover

Posted by bluedog on April 11, 2003, at 21:38:13

In reply to Re: Is my Maths correct?, posted by Larry Hoover on April 11, 2003, at 14:10:27

> > > Yes, but....how do you propose to measure out 62.5 mg?
> > >
> > Good point, I just checked out my kitchen scales and it would be rather difficult to measure out 62.5mg accurately. However doubling the amount to 125mg would be easier to measure out give or take a few grams but effectively doubling the strength of each 20ml dose to 300mg elemental Mg.
>
> You could also divide the 500 mg in half by volume. Just measure the whole thing in cups or whatever, and mix half of it with one litre of water. That would make 5 mL (one teaspoon) equal to 150 mg Mg.
>


Very good suggestion Larry!!!!!


> >
> > I can see your point, it would probably be a lot easier to buy a really cheap measuring cup with more graduations including 2.5ml, 5ml, 10ml etc to make things a little easier for me, or one of those sucky thingy's (I don't even know what you call them) with 0.5ml graduations) and to dissolve the whole 500g tub of my Mag Chlor into one litre of water.....Right?????
>
> It's the simplest thing to do, all things considered.
>
> > I did use a calculator but I initially had completely forgotton how to re-arrange equations but once I practiced a bit it all came back to me and I finally got there and this is the equation I came up with working with my limited measuring ability of only a 20ml measuring cup:-
> >
> > Xml=(60g)(20ml)/0.15
>
> To be rigorous, there would need to be a g after the 0.15.


Touche....now were even:):)


> > So all in all your original equation ends up being a lot more helpful to me:) :). In other words
> >
> > Xml = (1000ml)(0.5)/60g
>
> Again, just for the people following along at home, there needs to be a "g" alongside the 0.5.
>


Just rub it in why don't you :):):). Be aware I'm now on the lookout for any of your mistakes Larry ;).


> > but I have simply replaced the 0.5 you used as an example with my target strength of 0.15 to get my intended dose of 150mg of elemental Mg per dose. You only need vary the 0.5 to 0.15 or 0.3 or 0.5 etc to get the ml you require for a particular dose strength of elemental Mg.
>
> That's exactly right. You answer the question: "How much volume of this solution do I need to supply a given mass of Mg?"
>
> > And applying this equation 2.5ml of the whole 500g tub dissolved in one litre does indeed give me a 150mg dose of elemental Mg (give or take a few mg either way due to my equipment not being lab quality accuracy) but it's good enough for my purposes. I can't argue with the experts:) :).
> >
> You're welcome. You might want to consider the alternative I mentioned at the top.....divide the volume in half, and mix one of those halves into one litre. That gives you a more manageable volume/mass relationship of 5 mL to 150 mg Mg.
>


Like I said above....great idea Larry.....Also it's dead easy to measure out 250g on my kitchen scale.

Thanks once more Larry. Your an absolute gold-mine on this board!!!!

regards
bluedog


 

3 tsp-to-tablespoon

Posted by McPac on April 11, 2003, at 22:54:59

In reply to Re: Now I am confused! - Bluedog jodeye, posted by Larry Hoover on April 10, 2003, at 12:26:07

"three teaspoons in a tablespoon"

Every time I put two teaspoons of liquid onto a tablespoon it completely fills the rounded tablespoon up....putting a third teaspoon always causes a lot of the liquid to spill off the tablespoon...so how is it that 3 tsp = 1 tbspn?


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