Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 134775

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Auditory hallucination

Posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 0:53:51

Ok... make that, pseudo-hallucination. I know it isn't real.


Anyway, this is a bit scary... it's happened a few times in the last couple of weeks. I hear music coming from somewhere else in the house. A couple of nights ago it was an orchestra playing a film score, tonight it's Soundgarden playing "Fell On Black Days".

I read something about people OCD experiencing "musical OCD"... where songs play vividly in their heads. I have OCD... and I constantly have music in my head. However, this music seems somehow both in my head, but also coming from an external source. Anyone have any info as to the nature or origin of something like this? Could it be my meds (Effexor XR and Risperdal) or is it a manifestation of OCD or other psychiatric problems?

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Caleb462

Posted by Ritch on January 7, 2003, at 9:58:56

In reply to Auditory hallucination, posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 0:53:51

> Ok... make that, pseudo-hallucination. I know it isn't real.
>
>
> Anyway, this is a bit scary... it's happened a few times in the last couple of weeks. I hear music coming from somewhere else in the house. A couple of nights ago it was an orchestra playing a film score, tonight it's Soundgarden playing "Fell On Black Days".
>
> I read something about people OCD experiencing "musical OCD"... where songs play vividly in their heads. I have OCD... and I constantly have music in my head. However, this music seems somehow both in my head, but also coming from an external source. Anyone have any info as to the nature or origin of something like this? Could it be my meds (Effexor XR and Risperdal) or is it a manifestation of OCD or other psychiatric problems?

There have been strings of posts about this topic in the past. Try a search on "intrusive music" or "musical OCD". I have the same troubles as well. SSRI meds make it much WORSE for me however, which makes me think that it isn't a manifestation of OCD (in my case). Meds that make it dramatically lessened for me are anticonvulsants (esp. Depakote and Neurontin), which make me believe it is a temporal lobe phenomenon related to my bipolar disorder. Have you talked to your pdoc about them?

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Caleb462

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 7, 2003, at 12:51:22

In reply to Auditory hallucination, posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 0:53:51

Caleb462,
I saw your post and would like to extend to you any help tht you would request from me about the condition that you describe that you have here. There are many names for this condition and one is,[musical hallucinations]. I have this condition for many years and have been reserching it and have volumes of reports from reserchers around the world that have communicated with me personally and published reserch studys about this condition. I have also communicated with others around the world with this condition and could also share with you those commmunications if you would like. But before we communicate together, could you have the answers to the following ready in order to save time?
1)does the music play all the time?
2)does the song change?
3)can you change the song?
4)what causes the song to change, if it does change?
5)is the song(s) instrumental or are there voices singing?
6) Is the music evrything except [rock-n-roll] or do you hear [rock-n-roll music]?
7)Is the music off-key or "perfect"?
8)do you have any musical training ?
9)did any of your family practice a musical instrument while you were in the house growing up?
10)do you ever hear "bells" or "birds" in your music?
11) is there a flute in your music that you hear?
12) can you mask the music or does it rise above any attempts to [drown it out]?
13) does the music interfere with your sleep?
14) Did you take a mood and/or mind-altering drug shortly before the music started?
There are many catergories of this condition and if you would like for me to share what I know with you, you could email me or post here. But first, I have found out that:
A)the music has never caused any other bad thing to arrise out of it to the people that I know that have this condition or in the people in the cases in the liturature.
b)some people have had the condition disappear.
C)The condition is not always a [psychiatric manifistation].
Lou

 

Re: Auditory hallucination

Posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 16:29:21

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Caleb462, posted by Lou Pilder on January 7, 2003, at 12:51:22


> 1)does the music play all the time?

No. Much of the day, I have music playing in my head to some degree, but not ALWAYS. Also, it is only rare occassions in which the music becomes very vivid and loud, like last night.

> 2)does the song change?

Yes. Always different.

> 3)can you change the song?

No, not usually. Maybe to a small degree.

> 4)what causes the song to change, if it does change?

If the song changes on it's own, I don't know why... if it's something I've been listening to, and I listen to a different song.. then it might change to the new song.

> 5)is the song(s) instrumental or are there voices singing?

Varies.

> 6) Is the music evrything except [rock-n-roll] or do you hear [rock-n-roll music]?

Everything, including rock and roll.

> 7)Is the music off-key or "perfect"?

The constant, not very loud version of the music is usually "perfect". The more hallucinatory type music, like last night, seems to be somewhat off key.

> 8)do you have any musical training ?

No training, but I fool around with the guitar on my own.

> 9)did any of your family practice a musical instrument while you were in the house growing up?

No.

> 10)do you ever hear "bells" or "birds" in your music?

I don't believe I hear "bells" or "birds"... but odd sounds, "clicks", "beeps".. sometimes muffled voices... seem to occur occasionally and seem removed from the music.

> 11) is there a flute in your music that you hear?

No.

> 12) can you mask the music or does it rise above any attempts to [drown it out]?

I usually cannot mask the music.

> 13) does the music interfere with your sleep?

To a mild degree.

> 14) Did you take a mood and/or mind-altering drug shortly before the music started?

Nothing other than Effexor XR and Risperdal.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Caleb462

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 7, 2003, at 19:54:37

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination, posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 16:29:21

Caleb,
Your answers have indication of several possibilities from what I know about this condition. First, the condition that you describe often changes after the first month or so. For instance, I know of a case where the music was like yours at the beginning, and then chnged to all ballads and hymms 24/7.
There is the possibility that the music was precipitated by the psychotropic drugs that you referr to. However, I know of no cases that were precipitated by Effexor or Risperdal. In fact, there is one case that I know of that an elderly woman had her music stopped by taking Seroquel. However, these drugs are reletivley new and there is the possibility that the combination of the two drugs precipitated the music.
In your response, there is the possibility that you have a rare form of this condition, called [musical tinnitus]. I base this on your answer that you hear "clicks" and "beeps". This type of "music" leads into the area of audiology where the ear itself is involved in the manifestation of the music. I know of a case like this where if a stethascope is put on the ear of this person, one can hear the sounds.
I can think of two possibilities to explore at this time.
1)Ask your Dr. about the possibility of your music being induced by the drugs that you are taking and see if there can be a plan made to discontinue the drugs without potential harm, perhaps, by replacing them with another class of drug for a short time to see if the music stops.
2)Have an audiologist examine you for tinnitus, for there is an outside chance that your condition is connected to the ears.
3) If none of those are effective, then there are cases of this that are induced by epilepsy and tumors on the brain and associated parts. I know of a case where the temporal lobe of a person was involved and the "short" was being picked up by the auditory nerve of the brain and constitued into music. You would benifit from an MRI examination.
There is an outside chance that the music will stop on its own, but it is rare. It is believed by some that the [antichloinegic] properties of psychotropic drugs could be the precipitator of this condition. If that theory is correct, then Risperdol an/or Effexor could have precipitated the music. Another theory is that the drugs cause tinnitus by damaging a mechinism in the ear. Another theory is that women and the elderly are the most affected by this condition. Another theory is that the music is psychogenic, being a part of OCD and other psychiatric conditions. Another theory is that it is idiopathic, or no known cause. At any rate, ther are aveneus to explore to see if you could have the music stopped.
Best regards,
Lou

 

Re: Auditory hallucination

Posted by viridis on January 7, 2003, at 20:32:43

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Caleb462, posted by Lou Pilder on January 7, 2003, at 19:54:37

I've had very intense auditory hallucinations (almost always music) several times when I've gone for a long period without sleep. I'm not sure if "hallucination" is technically correct, since I'm fully aware it's not real -- yet I can hear the music (various kinds, from a popular song to a symphony orchestra) loud and clear, in great detail.

I don't know how relevant this is (it's always been associated with major sleep deprivation, and isn't "normal" for me) but thought I'd mention it. Perhaps lack of sleep interferes with key neurotransmitters in certain parts of the brain in the same ways that some meds can have this effect on certain people?

 

Re: Auditory hallucination

Posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 22:15:52

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination, posted by viridis on January 7, 2003, at 20:32:43

Thank you for the advice and info lou.

Also, re viridis' comment.... I should note that this particular time, I was also dealing with lack of sleep. But it has happened other times, when sleep has not been a factor.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination viridis

Posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 0:32:02

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination, posted by viridis on January 7, 2003, at 20:32:43

> I've had very intense auditory hallucinations (almost always music) several times when I've gone for a long period without sleep. I'm not sure if "hallucination" is technically correct, since I'm fully aware it's not real -- yet I can hear the music (various kinds, from a popular song to a symphony orchestra) loud and clear, in great detail.
>
> I don't know how relevant this is (it's always been associated with major sleep deprivation, and isn't "normal" for me) but thought I'd mention it. Perhaps lack of sleep interferes with key neurotransmitters in certain parts of the brain in the same ways that some meds can have this effect on certain people?

Hi, that is interesting that you mention sleep deprivation. I particularly notice the music stuff when I am hypomanic. I tend to sleep much less when I am hypo. Sleep deprivation also lowers the seizure threshold considerably. Also, when the music stuff is happening I also tend to experience deja vu episodes with heightened superstitiousness and a sense of magic being all around. The music tends to be stuff that I have been listening to recently. The more hypo I get the less contiguous the timing of the snippet of music is (a sampled portion is shorter in duration and repeats more often). More anticonvulsant = less music. More antidepressant = more music.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Ritch

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 8, 2003, at 6:27:39

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination viridis, posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 0:32:02

Rich,
You wrote,[....magic stuff all around....music that I heard recentley...]
This is extremley interesting. Any more to tell?
Lou

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Lou Pilder

Posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 9:40:08

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Ritch, posted by Lou Pilder on January 8, 2003, at 6:27:39

> Rich,
> You wrote,[....magic stuff all around....music that I heard recentley...]
> This is extremley interesting. Any more to tell?
> Lou
>

Lou, that pretty much sums it up. I have posted about this before in similar threads. I might have more detail when I am experiencing it, but I will have to wait for the good hypomanias and those won't kick in till April and May---Mitch

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Ritch

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 8, 2003, at 9:51:27

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Lou Pilder, posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 9:40:08

Ritch,
Has the song [Misty] ever played ?
Lou

 

Re: Auditory hallucination

Posted by agencypanic on January 8, 2003, at 19:32:28

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Lou Pilder, posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 9:40:08

I can confirm the sleep deprivation/audio hallucination link. Another
factor is diet, or more accurately, are you eating enough/frequently enough?
You're fortunate that you are able to 'know' that these hallucinations aren't real.
I've had them resulting from sleep deprivation and lack of food and have reached the point
at times when I was unable to make that determination. That's when it becomes truly frightening.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination--interesting link

Posted by viridis on January 8, 2003, at 21:26:55

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination, posted by agencypanic on January 8, 2003, at 19:32:28

Here's a web page I ran across on auditory hallucinations -- quite interesting. I guess there's a web page for everything!

http://www.macalester.edu/~psych/whathap/UBNRP/Audition/site/rin.html

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Lou Pilder

Posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 23:25:28

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Ritch, posted by Lou Pilder on January 8, 2003, at 9:51:27

> Ritch,
> Has the song [Misty] ever played ?
> Lou

Nope, not that I can recall.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination agencypanic

Posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 23:43:25

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination, posted by agencypanic on January 8, 2003, at 19:32:28

> I can confirm the sleep deprivation/audio hallucination link. Another
> factor is diet, or more accurately, are you eating enough/frequently enough?
> You're fortunate that you are able to 'know' that these hallucinations aren't real.
> I've had them resulting from sleep deprivation and lack of food and have reached the point
> at times when I was unable to make that determination. That's when it becomes truly frightening.


I think all of the "problems" I have with the music thing is simply a conundrum with music MEMORY circuits (involving the temporal lobe) and how that plays with short-term and long-term memory (of music). The music I "hear" (most often anyhow) is stuff that I have been listening to recently. I am defintely a music freak of sorts-I like to buy CD's every week and I listen to much more music played much louder than most people do (and I want NEW music every week). I also think it relates to PTSD-like brain chemistry in some way. When I am sleep-deprived, stressed, hypomanic, I have trouble terminating unneeded recent memories and they "echo" in my consciousness far longer than needed (music echoes if that is what I have been involved in). I quit taking Wellbutrin mainly because I would wake in the middle of the night at times and I would be dreaming about completing a technical paper I had not finished yet. I liken it to being in a very large canyon or cave that sound doesn't dampen well in. That's it-it is a matter of the qualitative ways that memories (generally musical ones-occasionally left-brained ruminative thoughts), FAIL to decay and disappear like most people experience.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Ritch

Posted by viridis on January 9, 2003, at 1:24:15

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination agencypanic, posted by Ritch on January 8, 2003, at 23:43:25

Interesting -- when I experience auditory musical hallucinations it's generally something unearthed from "deep" memory (i.e., some piece of music I haven't heard for years). I also hear people calling my name occasionally. Apparently the latter is especially common with auditory hallucinations induced by lack of sleep (the only situation in which I've experienced this phenomenon).

 

Re: Auditory hallucination viridis

Posted by Ritch on January 9, 2003, at 9:45:36

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Ritch, posted by viridis on January 9, 2003, at 1:24:15

> Interesting -- when I experience auditory musical hallucinations it's generally something unearthed from "deep" memory (i.e., some piece of music I haven't heard for years). I also hear people calling my name occasionally. Apparently the latter is especially common with auditory hallucinations induced by lack of sleep (the only situation in which I've experienced this phenomenon).

Hi, I get "old" musical memories that will come to the surface and "intrude" as well. They just make up the minority of the incidences. The older stuff tends to come up more when I haven't been listening to any music for awhile. For sure, however, the level of elevation of my mood is absoutely directly correlated to the quality and quantity of the musical "memory phenomena". If I get very depressed there is very little of it to remark about. There is more to it than a memory extinction problem it also is more of a *sensory* extinction problem. If I forget to take my Depakote (i.e.), or I reduce the dose, or I am unusually hypomanic or sleep-deprived, my alarm can go off (with the annoying beep beep), I can turn it off and still "hear" it continuing to beep for varying amounts of time afer I switch it off. The "volume" is diminished and then it finally quits after a few minutes (at most). My theory is the signal transduction is "over-facilitated" and doesn't die off like it should. The neurons keep firing repeatedly in the absence of the stimulus. SSRI's aggravate this worse than anything, esp. Prozac. Wellbutrin "switches" it from musical to verbal rumination (changes from right to left temporal lobe?).

 

Re: Auditory hallucination Caleb462

Posted by judy1 on January 9, 2003, at 12:28:54

In reply to Auditory hallucination, posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 0:53:51

I'm sorry I haven't read your responses, but I wanted to add that your very clear perception of your hallucinations probably are more indicative of a drug response or brain dysfunction than a true psychotic symptom. Especially music, when I have had psychotic symptoms in the past it was always a voice or voices. Did your pdoc suggest a neurologist?- you may want to go that route to rule out medical causes, then taper off your med(s) to rule that out too. Best of luck- judy

 

Re: Auditory hallucination

Posted by sowhysosad on April 2, 2009, at 18:12:30

In reply to Auditory hallucination, posted by Caleb462 on January 7, 2003, at 0:53:51

> Ok... make that, pseudo-hallucination. I know it isn't real.
>
>
> Anyway, this is a bit scary... it's happened a few times in the last couple of weeks. I hear music coming from somewhere else in the house. A couple of nights ago it was an orchestra playing a film score, tonight it's Soundgarden playing "Fell On Black Days".
>
> I read something about people OCD experiencing "musical OCD"... where songs play vividly in their heads. I have OCD... and I constantly have music in my head. However, this music seems somehow both in my head, but also coming from an external source. Anyone have any info as to the nature or origin of something like this? Could it be my meds (Effexor XR and Risperdal) or is it a manifestation of OCD or other psychiatric problems?

I have that too! Music vividly playing in my head, particularly when I try to sleep. I read somewhere that depleted serotonin may be to blame.

I hasten to add that mine is clearly in my head rather than appearing to come from an external source.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination

Posted by sowhysosad on April 2, 2009, at 18:17:41

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination Caleb462, posted by Lou Pilder on January 7, 2003, at 19:54:37

>It is believed by some that the [antichloinegic] properties of psychotropic drugs could be the precipitator of this condition.

That makes a lot of sense in my case. I'm currently on an anticholinergic AD, imipramine.

Although I believe I may have been on mirtazapine (which supposedly has no anticholinergic effects) when it started, so go figure.

 

Re: Auditory hallucination

Posted by B2chica on April 6, 2009, at 7:39:59

In reply to Re: Auditory hallucination, posted by sowhysosad on April 2, 2009, at 18:17:41

not sure what sets mine off as there's nothing patternistic about it. but every once and a while i hear a radio, but get this it's old music...like 40's. you know the sound of those old microphones and of course the style instruments and singers singing...
i actually find it a little humorous and somewhat comforting. not frightening or bothersome.

again, not sure of the cause. heard it on meds and off. when hypo manic and when depressed and when fine...
and since it normally doesn't last too long and just enjoy it and laugh a little.


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