Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 16036

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Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?

Posted by Zo on February 20, 2002, at 0:48:04

In reply to Dexedrine/Provigil Tolerance? Elizabeth, posted by IsoM on February 16, 2002, at 19:53:29

Sorry, you could build up a tolerance for Dex, or you have?

I've not heard of same, not in weeny Rx amounts. I can only stand 15mg on special days. . . And I am going to be on Dex rest of this life.

Best,
Zo

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? Zo

Posted by IsoM on February 20, 2002, at 2:22:33

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?, posted by Zo on February 20, 2002, at 0:48:04

Not sure if your question is meant for me, but I can (& have) developed a certain tolerance for Dexedrine before. I no longer take it but use adrafinil instead which is supposed to have a record of no tolerance build-up.

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?

Posted by Geezer on February 20, 2002, at 10:12:05

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?, posted by Zo on February 20, 2002, at 0:48:04

Can anyone tell me why one person would develope tolerance to Dex. while someone else would not? I can completely agree with Elizabeth's post - when a stim. is added to an ineffective AD, probably the effect felt is from the stim. and has nothing to do with the AD. Every time I used Dex. I experienced EUPHORIA (at any dose), Tolerance developed quickly and abuse went like a rocket.

I have tried 2 doses of Provigil 100mg. (now, after the fact, I understand this drug requires some time to work). Provigil felt like the bumbed-out rebound depression I used to get when the Dex. wore off.

I am not looking for a way to take pstims again - God knows I have paid the price for that. I would like to understand WHY a drug that could mean death for one can be helpful to another. I guess that is the purpose of this board.

All comments welcome......Thank you

Geezer

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Geezer

Posted by fachad on February 21, 2002, at 8:21:28

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?, posted by Geezer on February 20, 2002, at 10:12:05

Geezer,

As I posted in response to Elizabeth, I responded to a pstim (Ritalin) and was able to drop the AD (Serzone) without any loss of response.

In answer to your question about how some develop tolerance and some do not, I think it can be predicted by how a person perceives the initial drug effects.

If the initial "zap" that you experience from a pstim is experienced as euphoric, and you develop a liking for that feeling of euphoria, you will have to constantly increase the dose to get that same level of euphoria.

On the other hand, in my case, the initial "zap" was moderately disphoric - I felt edgy and uncomfortable - BUT my depression lifted.

I actually looked forward to developing "tolerance" to the zap so I could just enjoy not being depressed without being edgy.

After about a month of daily Ritalin, the "unsettled" feeling went away and it has worked for my depression for 7 years.

I think a valid analogy would be if someone really got off on the sedation an OTC antihistamine like Benadryl vs. someone whose allergies are relived by Benadryl.

The first person would find the drowsiness to wear off after a few days of constant use, and would have to increase the dose to get the same effect.

But the other person would find his allergies relived at the same dose for years, because histamine is still blocked, even though the subjective drowsiness is no longer perceived.

Just a guess, but it makes sense to me.

> Can anyone tell me why one person would develope tolerance to Dex. while someone else would not? I can completely agree with Elizabeth's post - when a stim. is added to an ineffective AD, probably the effect felt is from the stim. and has nothing to do with the AD. Every time I used Dex. I experienced EUPHORIA (at any dose), Tolerance developed quickly and abuse went like a rocket.
>
> I have tried 2 doses of Provigil 100mg. (now, after the fact, I understand this drug requires some time to work). Provigil felt like the bumbed-out rebound depression I used to get when the Dex. wore off.
>
> I am not looking for a way to take pstims again - God knows I have paid the price for that. I would like to understand WHY a drug that could mean death for one can be helpful to another. I guess that is the purpose of this board.
>
> All comments welcome......Thank you
>
> Geezer

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory

Posted by Geezer on February 21, 2002, at 11:08:54

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Geezer, posted by fachad on February 21, 2002, at 8:21:28

fachad,

Thank you so very much for your response RE: pstims. You have answered a question that goes far beyond casual interest in terms of importance.

The key factor you mentioned - "zap" = EURPHORIA, I believe and agree, is the predictor to good therapeutic treatment OR tolerance, abuse and serious consequences. My last experience with Dex. was 1985 (had abuse going back to 1962-intermittent). I started with 15mg. in AM, 4 months later I had increased the dose to 150mg. per day (honest). This episode required my full attention all day every day. I had 5 different docs writing scripts-had them filled at 5 different drug stores.

What ended the run? A pharmacist recognized my abuse and confronted me. He made it clear - detox. or else!

Here is what I have learned:

1) One size does not fit all. Pstims can be a blessing for some folks with depression and add but a potential death sentence for others with unstable mood disorders (I have Bipolar II-DXed in 2001).
2) The "zap theory". Any thing that makes you feel like Super Man with the first dose is no good for you.
3) Self medication based on my own subjective and flawed knowledge of psyc. meds. may result in a poor outcome.
4) A CORRECT DX is essential for treatment (never trust a pdoc that won't share the DX with you).
5) Modern day Mood Specialists (Psychopharmacologists) and contemporary psyc. drugs offer me a much better chance at survival (IMHO and yes I do men survival) than I had 30 years ago.

Thanks fachad.....I take your post as much more than "just a guess". Important stuff to a "Geezer" looking for answers.

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory fachad

Posted by IsoM on February 21, 2002, at 13:01:23

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Geezer, posted by fachad on February 21, 2002, at 8:21:28

I think it sounds like a pretty good guess but...

I can develop a tolerance to Dexedrine & I do experience that inital euphoria. But my 26 yr old son can also develop a tolerance to it & feels no euphoria on it at all. I was surprised he didn't - I assumed everyone would & questioned him about it. It only serves to keep him awake & focused. No euphoria whatsoever.

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Geezer

Posted by IsoM on February 21, 2002, at 13:06:20

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory, posted by Geezer on February 21, 2002, at 11:08:54

Geezer, please read my response to fachad about tolerance. I hope you guys don't mind me throwing this monkey wrench in the works but when I'm trying to understand or develop my own theory, I want to hear ALL possible reasons & views so as to eliminate what may not be correct.

My own 'quest', so to speak, is to better understand the pharmokinetics (sp?) of adrafinil/modafinil & the reasons for such different reactions in different individuals. There's so little real, solid medical info or studies on them.

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory IsoM

Posted by christophrejmc on February 21, 2002, at 14:34:48

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory fachad, posted by IsoM on February 21, 2002, at 13:01:23

> But my 26 yr old son can also develop a tolerance to it & feels no euphoria on it at all. I was surprised he didn't - I assumed everyone would & questioned him about it. It only serves to keep him awake & focused. No euphoria whatsoever.

I don't experience euphoria from stimulants (Ritalin, Dexedrine, Adderall), but I do develop tolerance to the stimulating properties (I can take a moderate dose and I'll still fall asleep). It still helps with ADD, just not fatigue. I had the same problem with Provigil -- it still helps with motivation, but not with fatigue (I would probably continue to use it if it didn't aggravate my back pain). Can you describe the euphoria you experience? (I overdosed on Dexedrine as a teen, but it only made me hallucinate.)

-chris

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?

Posted by Zo on February 21, 2002, at 15:03:33

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?, posted by Geezer on February 20, 2002, at 10:12:05

I think I would disagree with Elizabeth on the grounds that most ADs are incomplete, and I, for one, can't live without supplemented dopamine--and am (damn) highly allergic to Wellbutrin.

In my view, augmenting is rounding out the package, in one aspect or another--or it is the mysterious "booster" effect one drug can have for another, or synergistic.

I don't like the word stimulant, because it suggests a certain affect. For me and others with ADD and like conditions, Dex and similar meds are "organizing." While some theorize that they do indeed stimulate the left brain executive function to keep up with rock and roll right brain, that, in the end, has a "normalizing" effect.

In my experience, the fact that Dex and Adderall can leave one jazzed, depending on dose, is thorougly beside the point of their real purpose, and those effects should be dealt with on that basis, not as a contraindication.

Zo

 

Re: Dex and Bipolar

Posted by Zo on February 21, 2002, at 15:05:48

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory, posted by Geezer on February 21, 2002, at 11:08:54

I don't know what this proves. . but I had undiagnosed Bipolar II for several years while on Dexedrine, and it certainly did not aggravate it. If anything, it was stabilitizing because organizing.

Zo

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory christophrejmc

Posted by Zo on February 21, 2002, at 15:12:18

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory IsoM, posted by christophrejmc on February 21, 2002, at 14:34:48

Another complicating factor: Some--a very few--people are put to sleep by Dex and similar meds. My pdoc has one patient who takes hers before bed. This doesn't mean it's not doing it's job! It means she's lucky, she doesn't need a sleeping pill! Maybe Dex won't "cure" your fatigue, but perhaps it will help with ADD/focus. . .etc. One must be careful not to throw the baby out with the bathwater. . and not to dismiss a whole class of meds. Nor to expect any one med to Solve All. Whatever med makes you alert--that's the one that makes you alert! I use well-timed Dex, organic coffee and green tea! To each her own!

And hey, you gotta get excellent sleep!

Zo

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory

Posted by Geezer on February 21, 2002, at 15:23:50

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Geezer, posted by IsoM on February 21, 2002, at 13:06:20

> Geezer, please read my response to fachad about tolerance. I hope you guys don't mind me throwing this monkey wrench in the works but when I'm trying to understand or develop my own theory, I want to hear ALL possible reasons & views so as to eliminate what may not be correct.
>
> My own 'quest', so to speak, is to better understand the pharmokinetics (sp?) of adrafinil/modafinil & the reasons for such different reactions in different individuals. There's so little real, solid medical info or studies on them.

Hi IsoM

Good to hear from you. No monkey wrench at all!! I did as you suggested and went back and read your post to fachad. Also read my response to fachad - I should have said in #2...anything that makes ME feel like....is no good for ME. I know you are not challanging and like you I try so hard to find REAL answers. I don't think I can provide a better answer than you have in your post. Very possible the answers we are looking for in these meds. are not there (at least not yet). That's why I find comments like "everyone is different" very annoying - maybe the better thing to say is "I don't know" (and the truth be known neither does anyone else). I do believe a correct dx is important, I have experienced some of the drugs that diden't work (some that did more harm than good). I read a comment on another site the other day "defining the etiology of a mood disorder is like nailing jello to a tree". Hate to consider the possibility of psych drugs in the same vain - so I just choose not to.

Very best

Geezer

 

Re: Addiction to Dexedrine

Posted by BLPBart on February 21, 2002, at 15:39:31

In reply to Re: Addiction to Dexedrine, posted by Scott L. Schofield on January 16, 2000, at 20:51:17

I am currently on dex and wellbutrin. I started on prozac which made me nearly catatonic. My pdoc added wellbutrin which helped some with energy but eventually I had to quit the prozac entirely. It has been a couple of months now without the prozac and the wellbutrin seems to be working fine on the depression. Interestingly, in doing my reading on this forum, I came across some information concerning ADD and found out that I have it. My doc added the dexedrine two weeks ago. He's starting me out on a very low dose (10 mg/day for the first week and then add 10 mg/day for the next week and so on). I'm only on my second week and so I'm only on 20 mg/day and so far I don't think I've reached a high enough dose yet. Interestingly, since wb is fairly stimulating on its own, it helped a little with the disorganization problems even before I started the dex. I'm hoping that next week at 30 mg/day will be the right dosage for me.

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?

Posted by BLPBart on February 21, 2002, at 15:55:20

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance?, posted by Geezer on February 20, 2002, at 10:12:05

My dr gave me an interesting analogy about how different people respond to pstims. This was actually in regard to ADD people vs. "normal" people. He said that normal (i.e. non-ADDers) will respond initially to a low dose of pstims with a little more energy and focus than they normally would. As you increase the dosage, their reaction continues to increase along with it until you get to a point where the person is agitated and can't take any more. In other words the response is linear. He said that if you give pstims to a person with ADD that at a dose below what is therapeutic for them they don't feel anything. As you raise the dosage to a therapeutic level then the reaction is like a light switch being turned on. There's not a gradual response but a sudden one when the right dosage is reached. In my case my pdoc started me on 10 mg/day of dexedrine spansules and has me increasing by 10 mg/day each week. I'm only on 20 now and can't even tell that I'm taking anything.

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Zo

Posted by christophrejmc on February 21, 2002, at 18:38:19

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory christophrejmc, posted by Zo on February 21, 2002, at 15:12:18

Well, it's not just fatigue... I take several "mini-naps" throughout the day -- I have an uncontrolable urge to sleep, and so I nod off for about 5-15 minutes, often leaning against a wall (no matter how much I sleep at night). Stimulants don't make me drowsy, they simply don't help keep me awake after a few days. I don't expect anything to cure all my symptoms (I have taken stimulants off and on for many years), but I'd like to find one that at least helped with this particular one.

-chris

 

Re: amphetamine for depression

Posted by Frankie on February 22, 2002, at 1:21:15

In reply to Re: amphetamine for depression, posted by BLPBart on February 15, 2002, at 9:28:23

Hello guys,

I would first off, not recommend taking a stimulant with an MAO-I. Most drug books warn against this. I have heard the good about particularly Nardil and Parnate. I used St. John's Wort for years, which has some MAO-I action, and it worked really well, for a cheap over the counter herbal remedy. So, I am sure both of these medications are very effective. I would watch the blood pressure though with the combination. Amphetamines will be wonderful for depression, but only if you have the lethargic type. If you are unmotivated, unwanting to get out of bed, always tired, etc... Ritalin, Dex., Adderal, will all be great additions. But, if you are the anxious depressive type, like I am, I would not advise the stimulant. The MAO-I will be great for this, but the stimulant will increase any type of anxiety disorder. I tried a small dose of Ritalin recently, and my head felt like it was going to explode. My mind was out of control! But, Ritalin is pretty harsh. Dex. is much milder. I believe that the key is elevating all the neurotransmitters somewhat with resistant depression. If it is more lethargic, shoot for a Wellbutrin, or Adderal, in combination with a low dose of an SSRI. If it is anxiety based, an MAO-I, or SSRI in combination with a small dose of a benzodiazepine. That is the combo I find most effective. The MAO-I's are the most versatile, from what I have read. I have yet to try one though. I don't want to have to watch everything I eat for fear of a fatal reaction.

Frankie.

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory christophrejmc

Posted by Zo on February 22, 2002, at 2:05:28

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Zo, posted by christophrejmc on February 21, 2002, at 18:38:19

Haven't followed yr. posts--just got back--but that sure sounds like no REM sleep, which I've had, and I sympathize. . .Have you looked at the sleep angle? Apnea? Narcolepsy? Sleep study?

Zo

 

Re: Dexedrine, Sleep, and Euphoria christophrejmc

Posted by IsoM on February 22, 2002, at 2:51:41

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory IsoM, posted by christophrejmc on February 21, 2002, at 14:34:48

Poor Chris, it's sure no fun being sleepy all the time. I was always battling a strong desire to crawl back to bed & sleep. Of course, when I'm working there's no bed nearby so I spent my working time (even when actively working) yawning & wiping tears from my eyes from yawning so much. Like you, I could still sleep on Dexedrine - not always but if I was sleepy enough, I could sleep right throught the dose. It never prevented me from falling asleep but it did keep me more alert & if I was busy, I wouldn't want to fall asleep then.

Adrafinil sure keeps me going now. Today, I worked about the place, lots of up & down the stairs active work. I had music going & regularly stopped to dance with certain songs. Went off to work this afternoon/evening shift & was VERY busy (I think I can outwalk anyone at work). I'm getting tired now but it's 12:40 AM - I should be now! My energy has never been a problem, but I didn't have this much stamina before. It's a great feeling.

Blithering on again... back to the question you asked. The euphoria I felt on Dexedrine wasn't a mania at all but a good, pleased elated feeling, sort of benevolent to everyone. Stupid or thoughtless people didn't get on my nerves & I felt very cheerful. Just much more magnanimous in general. Maybe my definition of euphoria isn't everyone's.

I agree with Zo. Have you looked into the possiblity you might have narcolepsy? It ranges in a spectrum from very severe to mildly.

 

Re: REM sleep

Posted by christophrejmc on February 23, 2002, at 13:30:51

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory christophrejmc, posted by Zo on February 22, 2002, at 2:05:28

REM sleep? Do you mean stage 4 sleep (the one that narcoleptics don't get enough of)? I guess it is possible... I'm taking Nardil, which supresses REM more than any other medication, I believe (which is why it's used in narcolepsy). It hasn't made much difference in my sleeping. Perhaps I'll try something that increases REM and see how that works out. I'd like to get a sleep study done, but I'd have to be off all meds, which is not possible right now.

Thanks for the input!
-chris

 

Re: REM sleep christophrejmc

Posted by Elizabeth on February 23, 2002, at 16:33:01

In reply to Re: REM sleep, posted by christophrejmc on February 23, 2002, at 13:30:51

> REM sleep? Do you mean stage 4 sleep (the one that narcoleptics don't get enough of)?

No, Stage IV is "deep sleep" -- REM most resembles Stage I, a shallower stage of sleep. The difference between REM sleep and the other stages (apart from the eye movements and the presence of dreams in REM sleep) is that nonREM sleep is "synchronized" -- the neurons tend to fire at the same time, resulting in high-amplitude, low-frequency waves. REM sleep -- also known as "desynchronized" sleep -- produces low-amplitude, high-frequency waves because the neurons are all firing at different times.

Nardil's suppression of REM sleep makes it a very effective antinarcolepsy drug. Even before REM sleep is completely suppressed, Nardil prevents the skeletal muscle atonia that is ordinarily seen in REM sleep. This atonia is what causes cataplexy to occur in narcolepsy.

-elizabeth

 

Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory

Posted by Elizabeth on February 23, 2002, at 16:33:50

In reply to Re: Dexedrine Tolerance? A Theory Geezer, posted by fachad on February 21, 2002, at 8:21:28

I think that fachad is right on it: euphoria isn't a sustainable state. I wouldn't expect people to experience euphoria on typical doses of amphetamine that are given for depression or ADD, though.

I suggest that if you feel euphoric on Dexedrine, it probably is doing more for you than you need (i.e. relief from depression) and you should be able to feel fine/well (but not euphoric) on a lower dose. I'm guessing that it's not quite as simple as that, though: the line between "euphoric" and simply "well" is a blurred one, especially if "unwell" is the only thing you've known (as in a lifelong disorder).

Stimulant monotherapy is supposed to be effective in about 50% of depressives, compared with the two-thirds-or-so with other ADs. It seems reasonable to me that people who haven't had luck with regular ADs might benefit from trying stimulants. If your doctor is reluctant, offer to get tested for ADD or to take them in combination with something you've tried before (something that doesn't work but doesn't cause bad side effects, either).

I think I mentioned that before MAOIs and TCAs were discovered, amphetamine was a common treatment for serious depression. A relative of mine took amphetamine for years without any trouble. Pdocs should be aware that it does work for some people. (Then again, these are the same pdocs who refuse to acknowledge the antidepressant efficacy of opioids -- the *oldest* class of drugs used as antdepressants, they were used long before amphetamine, which I think was discovered in the 1940's.)

> I think a valid analogy would be if someone really got off on the sedation an OTC antihistamine like Benadryl vs. someone whose allergies are relived by Benadryl.

<major giggling>

-elizabeth

 

Re: amphetamine for depression Frankie

Posted by Elizabeth on February 23, 2002, at 17:22:45

In reply to Re: amphetamine for depression, posted by Frankie on February 22, 2002, at 1:21:15

> I would first off, not recommend taking a stimulant with an MAO-I.

It's risky, but some people can get away with it, and it's often worth the risk. Remember that hypertensive episodes such as those you'd get on MAOIs are very easy to treat; you just need to be able to monitor your BP. In the past, the MAOI-stimulant combination was commonly used in TRD.

> Amphetamines will be wonderful for depression, but only if you have the lethargic type. If you are unmotivated, unwanting to get out of bed, always tired, etc... Ritalin, Dex., Adderal, will all be great additions. But, if you are the anxious depressive type, like I am, I would not advise the stimulant.

A lot of times, anxiety and lethargy go together. Atypical depression, for example, generally includes lethargy, and it's frequently comorbid with an anxiety disorder such as panic disorder or social phobia. So while your advice looks good on paper (or on my computer screen), it turns out that reality is not so straightforward.

> The MAO-I will be great for this, but the stimulant will increase any type of anxiety disorder.

I've actually met people with social phobia who felt *better* on stimulants. Improved self-confidence, I'm guessing.

> I tried a small dose of Ritalin recently, and my head felt like it was going to explode. My mind was out of control!

A professor of mine said that when he tried it (apparently all med students take speed to stay awake), he became "quasi-psychotic." (He didn't elaborate on what he meant by that.) Some people just don't feel good when they take stimulants, and you can't really predict who will have this kind of reaction by their baseline level of anxiety.

> But, Ritalin is pretty harsh. Dex. is much milder.

Dexedrine is a stronger stimulant than Ritalin is, but it's possible that Ritalin has side effects (in particular, peripheral side effects) that are milder or nonexistent with Dexedrine.

> If it is more lethargic, shoot for a Wellbutrin, or Adderal, in combination with a low dose of an SSRI.

Hmm. I'm definitely lethargic and anergic, but SSRIs did nothing for me, and Wellbutrin made me feel awful. (I've only tried a stimulant once -- Cylert -- and it seemed to help keep my circadian cycle regulated and to improve my concentration and ability to focus. Not so much effect on mood, but I was only taking a small dose. Definitely didn't make anxiety worse.) I think SSRIs could potentially be counterproductive for an anergic patient, because of the "apathy syndrome" that sometimes occurs with long-term SSRI use.

> If it is anxiety based, an MAO-I, or SSRI in combination with a small dose of a benzodiazepine.

I think if you're going to use an SSRI to treat anxiety, you should have a benzo to take as-needed. SSRIs can greatly worsen anxiety in people who have anxiety disorders, initially. If you're going to treat panic disorder with an SSRI, it's best to start low (e.g., 5 mg Prozac or equivalent) and go slow.

> The MAO-I's are the most versatile, from what I have read. I have yet to try one though. I don't want to have to watch everything I eat for fear of a fatal reaction.

A lot of people have the same fear, but this fear really isn't justified. (Also, a lot of people who require MAOIs have hypochondriacal tendencies which cause them to blow the risk way out of proportion.) The necessary dietary restrictions are quite few, and they foods you need to avoid are not ingredients that might be in some dish without your knowledge. I think that the food restrictions shouldn't scare anyone away from taking MAOIs. People who take them don't have to live in constant fear, or anything of the sort.

-elizabeth

 

Re: REM sleep Elizabeth

Posted by christophrejmc on February 23, 2002, at 20:34:18

In reply to Re: REM sleep christophrejmc, posted by Elizabeth on February 23, 2002, at 16:33:01


> No, Stage IV is "deep sleep" -- REM most resembles Stage I, a shallower stage of sleep.

Yeah, I know -- Zo had thought that my EDS was caused by lack of REM.

> This atonia is what causes cataplexy to occur in narcolepsy.

That might be why my cataplectic-like sensations have gone away. I miss them. :(

Thanks for all the information!

-chris

 

Re: REM sleep christophrejmc

Posted by Elizabeth on February 26, 2002, at 20:49:21

In reply to Re: REM sleep Elizabeth, posted by christophrejmc on February 23, 2002, at 20:34:18

> Yeah, I know -- Zo had thought that my EDS was caused by lack of REM.

EDS would more likely be caused by lack of deep (Stages III-IV) sleep. REM sleep deprivation can lead to all sorts of nasty things, though (mood lability, hallucinations, etc.).

> That might be why my cataplectic-like sensations have gone away. I miss them. :(

Weird! :-}

-elizabeth

 

Re: Addiction to Dexedrine greg

Posted by rhappy on September 6, 2005, at 10:38:33

In reply to Re: Addiction to Dexedrine, posted by greg on January 16, 2000, at 0:26:52

I have just started 120mg of dex per day. I was initially on 40 then 80 now 120mg. This is 24 tablets a day x5mg. 40mg x 3 doses a day. I am told that the reason for this is due to Tolerance and It seems to be true "his happens because the enzymes in the liver and in the gut inactivate a greater and greater percentage of what you swallow over the weeks and months. It's the body's defence against foreign chemicals taken by mouth.

Q. Well, that's not too difficult! You need an increasing dose over time to stay where you are! And this is not addiction.' Does this go on for ever and ever so you end up shovelling tablets into you mouth?

A. No! This tolerance, this inactivation of the tablets swallowed has a ceiling. There comes a point where the gut and the liver stop trying to compete with the doctor, and the tolerance stops. The tolerance is capped!

Q. It's what?

A. It's capped! The tolerance is capped i.e. it has a ceiling so you never get anywhere near having to shovel tablets in."(http://www.adders.org/info28.htm)

I am just wondering if anyone else uses this much? Or more? or have links to documented cases? I have only been taking it for 6 months!


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