Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 87225

Shown: posts 1 to 10 of 10. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

I want to die

Posted by Christian on December 17, 2001, at 16:59:29


Nothing can help me, my life will never be the same.
I am sick of medications that do not touch my anxiety.
I have suffered every day for the last 6 months. Doctors and medications have destroyed my life, I am sick of living with no peace.

 

Re: I want to die

Posted by stjames on December 17, 2001, at 18:03:54

In reply to I want to die, posted by Christian on December 17, 2001, at 16:59:29

I suffered for 5 years and it took many months to find the right meds, but now, 18 yrs later, I am still doing great on the right meds.

james

 

Re: I want to die Christian

Posted by kid47 on December 18, 2001, at 10:11:02

In reply to I want to die, posted by Christian on December 17, 2001, at 16:59:29

Hi. Sorry you feel so bad. Are you currently taking any psycmeds? In therapy? Like you, many of us here have felt there is no hope. Believe me, it WILL get better!!! Unfortunately it can some time to find the right mix. Keep posting. Take care

kid


> Nothing can help me, my life will never be the same.
> I am sick of medications that do not touch my anxiety.
> I have suffered every day for the last 6 months. Doctors and medications have destroyed my life, I am sick of living with no peace.

 

Re: I want to die

Posted by Nicole Bardon on December 18, 2001, at 13:37:10

In reply to I want to die, posted by Christian on December 17, 2001, at 16:59:29

Christian, it's hard thinking straight when your brain chemistry is all blown out of shape. Anxiety can be tough to conquer. It requires both meds and therapy. Do you have a good doctor? A Psychiatrist, one who knows psychopharmacology? So many primary care doctors don't know enough. Also, unfortunately, all of us are different chemically and neurochemically, what works for someone else might now work for you and vice versa. Keep trying. It will get better. Do you have a psychotherapist? Everyone should have one of these. Someone to talk to who knows what you're going through and how to help you. Keep going. It will be all right.

 

Re: I want to die Nicole Bardon

Posted by adamie on December 18, 2001, at 22:47:03

In reply to Re: I want to die, posted by Nicole Bardon on December 18, 2001, at 13:37:10

i disagree. talking doesn't help the illness itself. it just lets someone know how you are feeling. therapy is more suited for people who have situational anxiety and depression. less for those who have a true illness they cannot control.

> Christian, it's hard thinking straight when your brain chemistry is all blown out of shape. Anxiety can be tough to conquer. It requires both meds and therapy. Do you have a good doctor? A Psychiatrist, one who knows psychopharmacology? So many primary care doctors don't know enough. Also, unfortunately, all of us are different chemically and neurochemically, what works for someone else might now work for you and vice versa. Keep trying. It will get better. Do you have a psychotherapist? Everyone should have one of these. Someone to talk to who knows what you're going through and how to help you. Keep going. It will be all right.

 

Re: I want to die adamie

Posted by sid on December 19, 2001, at 10:00:45

In reply to Re: I want to die Nicole Bardon, posted by adamie on December 18, 2001, at 22:47:03

I disagree. Different approaches can help treat different types of depression. And talking does not just let someone know how you're feeling - it permits you to feel not so lonely with this disease, not so abnormal, and that can help a heck of a lot in the healing process. It might not work for some people, but I would not rule it out in general. Definitions of types depression are fuzzy, doctors can't even tell you what drug works better for what type of depression, we know so little about this darn disease that when we are faced with it, we need to try things that are suitable to us without limitations based on what pharmaceutical companies want us to believe.

Fine, you're not crazy about sharing your thoughts and feelings, it's your choice. However that's what got me out of my major depression (along with acupuncture) even though I've had chronic depression for my entire adult life. I've worked hard to make changes in my thought patterns, as much as I possible can to avoid relapses, and to change some of my self-defeating behavior. It has helped me, even though I am pretty sure I'll be dealing with chronic depression and positive probability of relapses all my life - it runs in the family. Don't ruin it for others who might find some comfort in talking please.

Also, if someone could control the disease, as you seem to imply, one would not have it to start with. Being closed-minded never helped anyone heal from anything.

> i disagree. talking doesn't help the illness itself. it just lets someone know how you are feeling. therapy is more suited for people who have situational anxiety and depression. less for those who have a true illness they cannot control.
>
> > Christian, it's hard thinking straight when your brain chemistry is all blown out of shape. Anxiety can be tough to conquer. It requires both meds and therapy. Do you have a good doctor? A Psychiatrist, one who knows psychopharmacology? So many primary care doctors don't know enough. Also, unfortunately, all of us are different chemically and neurochemically, what works for someone else might now work for you and vice versa. Keep trying. It will get better. Do you have a psychotherapist? Everyone should have one of these. Someone to talk to who knows what you're going through and how to help you. Keep going. It will be all right.

 

Sid: about talking sid

Posted by IsoM on December 19, 2001, at 13:31:58

In reply to Re: I want to die adamie, posted by sid on December 19, 2001, at 10:00:45

Sid, I talk with adamie through e-mail, & I don't think he quite meant that. He doesn't hold back & seems quite open. Some people who've had depression for years develop "unhealthy" thinking patterns & talk therapy is very beneficial for them to retrain their thought processes & to overcome guilty feelings that they shouldn't have.

If someone was "normal" before & some episode precipitated the depression, just straightening the brain chemistry will make them feel good. But it doesn't happen like that very often.

I think it can be a fine line to tread for a doctor. Doctor asks patient "How are you feeling? Any problems you want to talk about?" & patient says "Nope! Everything's good." Does the doctor believe the patient or not? Is the patient really feeling good now or just refusing to discuss problems? I think it would be an awfully tough situation to judge correctly. That's why they're well-trained.

Some people just need to share their feelings with someone, but many really do need talk therapy along with their medications.

 

Re: Sid: about talking IsoM

Posted by sid on December 19, 2001, at 15:22:44

In reply to Sid: about talking sid, posted by IsoM on December 19, 2001, at 13:31:58

IsoM,
thanks for your message.

Well, I can't vow for what he/she meant to say, only for what was written, and I disagreed with it. Some people do make the choice of not trying psychotherapy and it is their right not to even consider it. Doesn't mean it wouldn't work however.

I work with someone who's been on antidepressants for a long time. She is blatantly in need of therapy, makes everybody around her miserable because of her bad and irrational temper, but hey! she's above questioning herself, according to her - nothing wrong with her except brain chemistry. I happen to think that a little work would change her life for the better. No amount of antidepressant will do anything for someone who needs therapy and no amount of therapy will help anyone who needs antidepressants only. I think that most people with depression need both, especially to avoid relapses. Professionals, especially those with PhDs (I am one of them), tend to protect their turfs and that's why there is such a separation between psychology and psychiatry. Some of them are oprn minded enough to recommend both approaches jointly, but they are still too rare I find.

Anyway, I had to say something because psychotherapy contributed to saving my life and I believe it could help many others. And my depression was real, I went as far as losing some psychomotricity - I could have not signed my name if my life had depended on it. That was more than just being depressed, that was real uncontrollable major depression. Mind you, drugs might have done the job too, perhaps faster, but in the long run I am persuaded that I can avoid relapses better.

> Sid, I talk with adamie through e-mail, & I don't think he quite meant that. He doesn't hold back & seems quite open. Some people who've had depression for years develop "unhealthy" thinking patterns & talk therapy is very beneficial for them to retrain their thought processes & to overcome guilty feelings that they shouldn't have.
>
> If someone was "normal" before & some episode precipitated the depression, just straightening the brain chemistry will make them feel good. But it doesn't happen like that very often.
>
> I think it can be a fine line to tread for a doctor. Doctor asks patient "How are you feeling? Any problems you want to talk about?" & patient says "Nope! Everything's good." Does the doctor believe the patient or not? Is the patient really feeling good now or just refusing to discuss problems? I think it would be an awfully tough situation to judge correctly. That's why they're well-trained.
>
> Some people just need to share their feelings with someone, but many really do need talk therapy along with their medications.

 

Totally Agree With You!! (nm) sid

Posted by IsoM on December 20, 2001, at 2:26:02

In reply to Re: Sid: about talking IsoM, posted by sid on December 19, 2001, at 15:22:44

 

Re: Sid: about talking sid

Posted by jay on December 21, 2001, at 18:15:44

In reply to Re: Sid: about talking IsoM, posted by sid on December 19, 2001, at 15:22:44


Sid:

Great post...thanks! I very much agree with you, and I wish both insurance companies and the government would pay more money out for all types of talking therapy.

I think there is a *tremendous* potential to be gained from all types of talking therapy, in particular in those slow, tiny moments a person is starting to feel "a bit" better, possibly from symptom relief by meds. I think it opens a window of sorts.

Talking therapy isn't also just about psychotherapy...I think some of the newer therapies can benefit as well. In particular, there a few, such as person-centered counselling, as well as interpersonal and life-skill counselling that can help many of us with the day-to-day problems, mostly in communication with the people around us.

Often, stress is a result of communication problems, and learning to handle those problems well can be a *major* booster. Anything from talking to our partners...our bosses...anybody who plays a role in our life, really. When we learn to handle these stresses, they can bring a *massive* amount of relief. Sadly, it seems that it takes a *very* long time for us to realize this, and I (even being a counsellor myself!) couldn't really benefit from it until I was into treatment for my depression and anxiety for 8 or so years. Mind you, the meds I am on where not around when I first was treated, and these meds where the only ones that have proven to be somewhat effective.

So, in closing, I just wanted to second the potential power of using both medication and talk therapy. I would strongly suggest, as hard as it is, even for folks to go to *any* local support group, learning things about the importance of communication, etc. Also, try to find one operated by someone who is trained in various therapy, especially interpersonal therapy and life-skills therapy. Those are things we can use *everday* in our lives, and as we conquer one thing, we get more confidence, and another...and it really *snowballs*...and we feel darn good about ourselves.

Again...this is just my belief in that most of us, but as you say only when willing, can benefit from a combined medication and *many* types of talk therapy, esp. beyond traditional psychotherapy.

Jay

> IsoM,
> thanks for your message.
>
> Well, I can't vow for what he/she meant to say, only for what was written, and I disagreed with it. Some people do make the choice of not trying psychotherapy and it is their right not to even consider it. Doesn't mean it wouldn't work however.
>
> I work with someone who's been on antidepressants for a long time. She is blatantly in need of therapy, makes everybody around her miserable because of her bad and irrational temper, but hey! she's above questioning herself, according to her - nothing wrong with her except brain chemistry. I happen to think that a little work would change her life for the better. No amount of antidepressant will do anything for someone who needs therapy and no amount of therapy will help anyone who needs antidepressants only. I think that most people with depression need both, especially to avoid relapses. Professionals, especially those with PhDs (I am one of them), tend to protect their turfs and that's why there is such a separation between psychology and psychiatry. Some of them are oprn minded enough to recommend both approaches jointly, but they are still too rare I find.
>
> Anyway, I had to say something because psychotherapy contributed to saving my life and I believe it could help many others. And my depression was real, I went as far as losing some psychomotricity - I could have not signed my name if my life had depended on it. That was more than just being depressed, that was real uncontrollable major depression. Mind you, drugs might have done the job too, perhaps faster, but in the long run I am persuaded that I can avoid relapses better.
>
> > Sid, I talk with adamie through e-mail, & I don't think he quite meant that. He doesn't hold back & seems quite open. Some people who've had depression for years develop "unhealthy" thinking patterns & talk therapy is very beneficial for them to retrain their thought processes & to overcome guilty feelings that they shouldn't have.
> >
> > If someone was "normal" before & some episode precipitated the depression, just straightening the brain chemistry will make them feel good. But it doesn't happen like that very often.
> >
> > I think it can be a fine line to tread for a doctor. Doctor asks patient "How are you feeling? Any problems you want to talk about?" & patient says "Nope! Everything's good." Does the doctor believe the patient or not? Is the patient really feeling good now or just refusing to discuss problems? I think it would be an awfully tough situation to judge correctly. That's why they're well-trained.
> >
> > Some people just need to share their feelings with someone, but many really do need talk therapy along with their medications.


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