Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 87154

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Re: Asperger's disorder JahL

Posted by Augusta on December 17, 2001, at 0:30:56

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder -- redux Augusta, posted by JahL on December 17, 2001, at 0:20:41

JahL,

Why "whoops"? Perhaps I expressed myself clumsily -- I meant to say that OASIS seems to be one of *the* big sources of information for this topic on the Net.

Actually I did not see your citation / link until after I had posted mine. I wonder what it means that both of us gave the exact same site?? -- that it's one of the biggies, I guess!

 

Re: confusion Augusta

Posted by JahL on December 17, 2001, at 0:45:49

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder JahL, posted by Augusta on December 17, 2001, at 0:30:56


> Why "whoops"?

It's the old transatlantic language confusion thang again (I'm UK). Plus it's 6:40 in the morning here, I'm yet to sleep & I've been 'smoking' for England all day %^)

By 'stop' I thought you meant 'obstacle' (in obtaining info). Thought maybe it was one of those crackpot sites like Benzo ******s (not going to give them any free advertising).

> Actually I did not see your citation / link until after I had posted mine. I wonder what it means that both of us gave the exact same site??

I only looked at it quickly but it seemed to be pretty informative and thorough and it tallied w/ everything I'd heard & read. Good to know I was right :-)

J.

 

Re: Asperger's disorder Elizabeth

Posted by IsoM on December 17, 2001, at 1:27:43

In reply to Asperger's disorder, posted by Elizabeth on December 16, 2001, at 23:15:18

hi Elizabeth. My 26 year old son has Asperger syndrome - I can speak from personal experience about it. He has definitely been different from my other two sons & very difficult to manage when he was young. Doctors & psychologists told me I was imagining his behaviour & exaggerating it too.

When he was 22, I read an article in the Scientific American on Asperger by Uta Frith (one of the best authorities on it) & I recognised what he had. We made an appointment with a psychologist who tests & deals with autism & Asperger. The testing was pretty expensive but I'm glad we did it. My son was very glad too. As he said "it helps to put a name on it & to know it's not my fault I act different."

Asperger people tend to have a slightly above to way over genius level. The psych who did the testing told us that my son had an IQ of 1:10,000 people - way over genius level. Because he's so bright, he's learned how to act around people - more by rote than just acting naturally.

If you have Asperger, even mild, you'll know by a few things.
When you're around others, even one or two, you can't "read" their moods or expressions well. You're not sure of all the body language cues unless you're really trying. What comes natural to most without even thinking about it, isn't even noticed by people with Asperger.

You'll feel emotionally remote from others, not being able to really share in their feelings or moods. My son has terrible trouble interpreting small facial gestures. If a person was to grimace or frown or raise an eyebrow in disbelief, he doesn't even see these things. People with Asperger can have a sense of humour & wit but not about people's nature - they just don't "get it". When they find something funny, they'll be amused & smile but rarely laugh - their facial "language" is stiff & expresses little, like a poker face almost.

You may have some Asperger traits but as my son, the psychologist, & I all said, having some of those traits are good. It tends to make a person more logical & open, as they don't play mental games with other people. they simply can't.

Because you converse so easily here in the forum, I highly doubt you have the syndrome, maybe just some of the traits. The psychologist said my son's Asperger is either fairly mild or he's trained himself so well not to show it. But it would be impossible for him to ever go on a forum & "converse" with others. Even dealing with people on the phone is extremely difficult for him.

The brain is hard-wired in a person with Asperger, there's no treatment for it, only treatment for some of the problems that come with it such as depression, anxiety, & panic disorders. These people are so bright that they're fully aware they're different & don't fit in easily. It can often lead to depression & panic in groups where they literally don't know a lot of what's going on, being unable to socially "read" what people mean.

Sorry for such a long post, but it's not easy to put the symptoms in a nutshell.


> Hi folks. Does anyone here know anything about Asperger's? I've read about it, and it's been suggested that I may have a "mild" form of it, but I'm sort of confused as to what it means! It's not a "popular" dx like ADD, especially in adults, so most pdocs don't bring it up, but I'm curious about it. What about treatments -- are there any?
>
> TIA,
> -elizabeth

 

Re: Asperger's disorder

Posted by christophreJMC on December 17, 2001, at 1:43:42

In reply to Asperger's disorder, posted by Elizabeth on December 16, 2001, at 23:15:18

It has been suggested that I, too, may have a mild form of Asperger's. There is no concrete definition, but some common symptoms. There really is no medical treatment, but I know of a few who benefit from psychotherapy. Depression can be quite common in adolescence, probably due to social isolation & alienation. Even if I don't have Asperger's, I've found that some of the techniques used by aspers have been very helpful for me (especially with school and social problems). If you find any good information, please share it -- I would be very interested.

Christophre.
P.S.: http://www.autistics.org is a pretty good website written by a high-functioning autistic

 

Re: Asperger's disorder

Posted by NikkiT2 on December 17, 2001, at 6:41:23

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder Elizabeth, posted by IsoM on December 17, 2001, at 1:27:43

I have a friend with aspergers... He is fine on line (but often crosses "lines", as he doesn't seem to know limits on what he says) and all his friendships are on line. He just can't function around people in reality... He has no idea on how to interact with them!

He is on an AD for underlying depression, but hasn't been given any other options as he won't see a different doc and try to push for help.

My nephew is severely autistic, and has recently started at a "special school" where he gets alot of individual attention and help and the changes in him are amazing - he will now interact with peopel to let them now of his needs and wants (which had never happened before) and I got my first cuddle off him when we visited a few weeks ago (he's 8!).
So, Iw ould think that some behavioural type therapies would be of some help.

Nikki

 

Re: Asperger's disorder

Posted by borderliner21 on December 17, 2001, at 13:03:24

In reply to Asperger's disorder, posted by Elizabeth on December 16, 2001, at 23:15:18

Could I have been misdiagnosed???
HI I was diagnosed with tourret's syndrome when I was a young child. I read that people with asperger's get misdiagnosed with tourrett's or other disorders (add, odd) . I fit most of the description of asperger's(higher functioning autism) I am interested in very few things, I do repetitive activities over and over every day, look away upon meeting some people etc. and as a child I always learning things differently from other child and wanted to socialize but just didn't know how... I know you guys can't diagnose me but does it sound like I have asperger's instead of tourrett's all along? I just saw a psychologist recently and she diagnosed me with borderline and avoidant personality instead!
any input would be appreciated. thanks

 

Re: Asperger's disorder borderliner21

Posted by IsoM on December 17, 2001, at 13:39:54

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder, posted by borderliner21 on December 17, 2001, at 13:03:24

Asperger people do repetitive things too. It's not like the physical twitches & shrugs that I've seen in a friend with Tourette's but more doing the same thing over & over. My son will get a lock of hair & twist it repeatedly while he talks to me. When he was young, after every spoon of food he put in his mouth, he'd scrape the side of his mouth with the spoon as if he slopped a little even when there was nothing there. He'd do it so much he made it raw. There were many other repetitive things he'd do when young but has stopped most things. He'll still pull at his skin on his neck as he discusses things & I have to gently remind him not to. He can stop them when reminded but doesn't realise that he starts them. He's never blurted out comments or sounds like someone with Tourette's can.

One of the most interesting things I found when researching Asperger was many of those with it dislike close physical contact but crave something anyway. When I nursed him as a child, I could cuddle him but when he stopped nursing, I only could hold him when he was scared & ran to me for comfort. He can now hug me fine (he's 26) but dislike anyone else touching him, even a friendly hand on the shoulder. When he was young, to get the contact he'd wrap himself very tight in blankets & lay swaddled feeling a comfort from the confinement.

It's something I've read many do. One of the most famous people with Asperger is Temple Grandin, a professor who's actually lectured on it. When she was young, she made herself a device that enclosed her to get the relief without the cuddling.

People with Asperger will like other people or admire them, they may crave friendship but they wish to be alone alot. They rarely develop a "love" for anyone other than perhaps one major caretaker.

The interest in few things is also part of it. Their interest seems to be hyperfocused on these things & they'll read, talk, do these things to the exclusion of many other things. They can't be easily deterred from their interests.

Does any of this sound like you?

****************************************************************************************************

> Could I have been misdiagnosed???
> HI I was diagnosed with tourret's syndrome when I was a young child. I read that people with asperger's get misdiagnosed with tourrett's or other disorders (add, odd) . I fit most of the description of asperger's(higher functioning autism) I am interested in very few things, I do repetitive activities over and over every day, look away upon meeting some people etc. and as a child I always learning things differently from other child and wanted to socialize but just didn't know how... I know you guys can't diagnose me but does it sound like I have asperger's instead of tourrett's all along? I just saw a psychologist recently and she diagnosed me with borderline and avoidant personality instead!
> any input would be appreciated. thanks

 

Re: Asperger's disorder

Posted by PaulB on December 17, 2001, at 18:19:58

In reply to Asperger's disorder, posted by Elizabeth on December 16, 2001, at 23:15:18

> Hi folks. Does anyone here know anything about Asperger's? I've read about it, and it's been suggested that I may have a "mild" form of it, but I'm sort of confused as to what it means! It's not a "popular" dx like ADD, especially in adults, so most pdocs don't bring it up, but I'm curious about it. What about treatments -- are there any?
>
> TIA,
> -elizabeth

Hi Elizabeth

Its nice to hear from you again. I have received a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome which is a mild form of Autism. In fact I have just this minute come back from my weekly meeting. I have read quite a few of your posts over the last year and I think you have had social anxiety and take buprenorphine. Social Anxiety can be a symptom of Aspergers as can depression. At first I as skeptical but now I definetely see symptoms of it in myself. I posted a message about it a short while ago when I first received my diagnosis:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/social/20010915/msgs/11773.html

As I mentioned here a great introduction to Aspergers is a book by Tony Attwood and he has a website too that I have provided a link for.

As to meds, the only medications currently indicated for Asperger's Syndrome are the SSRI's. Fluvoxamine has been tested but unfortunately unlike depression and anxiety, Asperger's is more of a behavioural disorder than chemical, not to say that all people with depression or anxiety have chemical imbalances, but I hope you know what I mean. Therefore my psychologist spoke in the meeting a few weeks ago about how people have to learn to live with it to a certain extent.

In Britain if you receive a diagnosis of Asperger's you can receive both income support and disability allowance.

Clomipramine is another medicine that has also been tested and I suspect is probably one of the most effective medications for Asperger's due to its very potent seroternergic properties.

Im new to the fascinating world of Asperger's and I look forward to learning more about it. Its tough but Asperger's people can do things normal people cant, i.e. Remember that Tom Cruise film Rainman with Raymond who had full blown Aspergers. Theres people at my group who have similar abilities.

 

medication for Asperger's disorder PaulB

Posted by IsoM on December 17, 2001, at 18:39:38

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder, posted by PaulB on December 17, 2001, at 18:19:58

Paul I just want to add a comment. My son benefited greatly from the addition of clonazepam for his social anxiety. He no longer needs it as he's now in a working & study environment where his Asperger is no longer a handicap but his strong point. I have heard that SSRIs are good for the depression part, but he does better on clomipramine & continues on a low dosage of it.
***************************************************************************************************
> > Hi folks. Does anyone here know anything about Asperger's? I've read about it, and it's been suggested that I may have a "mild" form of it, but I'm sort of confused as to what it means! It's not a "popular" dx like ADD, especially in adults, so most pdocs don't bring it up, but I'm curious about it. What about treatments -- are there any?
> >
> > TIA,
> > -elizabeth
>
> Hi Elizabeth
>
> Its nice to hear from you again. I have received a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome which is a mild form of Autism. In fact I have just this minute come back from my weekly meeting. I have read quite a few of your posts over the last year and I think you have had social anxiety and take buprenorphine. Social Anxiety can be a symptom of Aspergers as can depression. At first I as skeptical but now I definetely see symptoms of it in myself. I posted a message about it a short while ago when I first received my diagnosis:
>
> http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/social/20010915/msgs/11773.html
>
> As I mentioned here a great introduction to Aspergers is a book by Tony Attwood and he has a website too that I have provided a link for.
>
> As to meds, the only medications currently indicated for Asperger's Syndrome are the SSRI's. Fluvoxamine has been tested but unfortunately unlike depression and anxiety, Asperger's is more of a behavioural disorder than chemical, not to say that all people with depression or anxiety have chemical imbalances, but I hope you know what I mean. Therefore my psychologist spoke in the meeting a few weeks ago about how people have to learn to live with it to a certain extent.
>
> In Britain if you receive a diagnosis of Asperger's you can receive both income support and disability allowance.
>
> Clomipramine is another medicine that has also been tested and I suspect is probably one of the most effective medications for Asperger's due to its very potent seroternergic properties.
>
> Im new to the fascinating world of Asperger's and I look forward to learning more about it. Its tough but Asperger's people can do things normal people cant, i.e. Remember that Tom Cruise film Rainman with Raymond who had full blown Aspergers. Theres people at my group who have similar abilities.

 

Re: medication for Asperger's disorder

Posted by borderliner21 on December 17, 2001, at 20:54:00

In reply to medication for Asperger's disorder PaulB, posted by IsoM on December 17, 2001, at 18:39:38

Tricylic antidepressants help the repetive actions in autism. I also read that SSRi's can cause autistic people to become suicidal but this can probably happen to anyone; this happened to me.(another reason why I think I have something similar to asperger's and not tourret's) Also, Anti-psychotics have been shown to help with the loss of reality in asperger's folks. How do ssri's work for autistic folks. I tried ssri's but I find that when I am on them I lose my creativity , crave marijuana and I lose interest in my family.

 

SSRIs for Asperger's disorder borderliner21

Posted by IsoM on December 18, 2001, at 1:25:32

In reply to Re: medication for Asperger's disorder, posted by borderliner21 on December 17, 2001, at 20:54:00

That's quite an interesting point about TCs as compared to SSRIs. Perhaps that explains why my son never responded well to the many different ones that was tried on him, & yes, he became suicidal twice & needed to be hospitalised.

He does well on the clomipramine, better than any other kind. Haloperidol was tried on him when he was young to control his anger, but it wasn't anger we discovered as he grew up. It was his extreme frustration in trying to deal with life & people, & he had no suitable way to express it.

Thanks for your information about that.

****************************************************************************************************

> Tricylic antidepressants help the repetive actions in autism. I also read that SSRi's can cause autistic people to become suicidal but this can probably happen to anyone; this happened to me.(another reason why I think I have something similar to asperger's and not tourret's) Also, Anti-psychotics have been shown to help with the loss of reality in asperger's folks. How do ssri's work for autistic folks. I tried ssri's but I find that when I am on them I lose my creativity , crave marijuana and I lose interest in my family.

 

Re: Asperger's disorder

Posted by Seamus2 on December 18, 2001, at 21:05:33

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder, posted by PaulB on December 17, 2001, at 18:19:58

> >Theres people at my group who have similar abilities.< <

How do you find a group? I'm "on the spectrum" and would like to meet some others like me.

Ideally, I'd like to find a social, not "support" group. I don't bewail nor obsess on my condition, just take it as the hand that fate dealt out. But it's lonely sometimes. Something like Mensa for AS would be perfect! (IMX, anyone with AS qualifies for Mensa)

 

Re: medication for Asperger's disorder IsoM

Posted by Seamus2 on December 18, 2001, at 21:09:25

In reply to medication for Asperger's disorder PaulB, posted by IsoM on December 17, 2001, at 18:39:38

> >but he does better on clomipramine & continues on a low dosage of it.< <

What's he taking it for? Obsessional thoughts or depression? And how old is he? And what's the dose?

And does IsoM mean what I think it does? < g >

 

Re: medication for Asperger's disorder Seamus2

Posted by IsoM on December 19, 2001, at 2:52:10

In reply to Re: medication for Asperger's disorder IsoM, posted by Seamus2 on December 18, 2001, at 21:09:25

Seamus, my son takes the clompramine for depression. He had some bad, bad times & has been hospitalised twice for depression. Once he was really suicidal. He'd been doing fine on clomipramine when he was in his teens, but out of the blue, he developed pancreatitis & had to hospitalised. We had just moved, didn't know any doctors, & that doctor took him off all his meds. After years of SSRIs & depression full force again, I asked our present doctor if he couldn't be tried on clompramine again & he was agreeable to write out a prescription. He's done well ever since.

His environment at home has also changed (no more angry father that no one can meet his standards), & he's working at a software company where he's well suited & valued. It makes a real difference.

I could tell you his dosage tomorrow but right now, he's asleep & his meds on his bookcase in his room. He's had certain obsessional thoughts but the depression was always the worse. He still has panicky feelings in large crowds that he's not familiar with & really doesn't like crowds at all. He's 26 & because he needs to be around people, college courses at night & work by day, he's slowly getting used to people.

IsoM is just short for isomorphix a user name I picked. I'm a science geek, especially biology & it's just a twist on a biology term. I'm not sure what you meant it to be. Maybe I'm just naive.

****************************************************************************************************
> > >but he does better on clomipramine & continues on a low dosage of it.< <
>
> What's he taking it for? Obsessional thoughts or depression? And how old is he? And what's the dose?
>
> And does IsoM mean what I think it does? < g >

 

Amount of Clomipramine Seamus2

Posted by IsoM on December 19, 2001, at 13:22:50

In reply to Re: medication for Asperger's disorder IsoM, posted by Seamus2 on December 18, 2001, at 21:09:25

Seamus, my son takes 50 mg only of clominpramine at bed-time. He does take Dexedrine through the day as needed. On the weekends, he prefers to give the Dex a holiday. The amount of clomipramine is pretty small. He used to take more but in his situation now that it's good, it's been lowered & he does fairly good on it. Much more & his heart-rate increases.

 

Re: Asperger's disorder

Posted by Noa on December 19, 2001, at 18:56:49

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder, posted by Augusta on December 17, 2001, at 0:03:09

I think another common aspect of Aspergers is intense interest in one thing--like collecting, or fascination with one topic or hobby, etc.

 

Re: Asperger's disorder Noa

Posted by IsoM on December 19, 2001, at 19:41:55

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder, posted by Noa on December 19, 2001, at 18:56:49


Most times, yes, intense interest in a narrow range of subjects is quite true, but not always. It may depend on their intelligence & how many interest they were exposed to as a child. Even though my son has Aspergers, & computers take up his main interest, he's also very interested in Japanese culture, language, art & cuisine. He's interested in other aspects of art, a lot of different literature, wood-working, astronomy, & other things but I can see the intense focus on computers mostly.

************************************************************************************************

> I think another common aspect of Aspergers is intense interest in one thing--like collecting, or fascination with one topic or hobby, etc.

 

Re: Asperger's disorder

Posted by caroline on December 21, 2001, at 14:45:31

In reply to Asperger's disorder, posted by Elizabeth on December 16, 2001, at 23:15:18


Hi,

I have aspergers. I use 75mg remeron, 75mg of anafranil (to help me sleep) + Imovane (zopiclone) taken as a day drug to help me think laterally, deal with social situations etc. I usually take 3x7.5 a day. It all works like a dream; has done for about 18 months now.

Best, Caroline

 

For CAROLINE: Re: Asperger's disorder caroline

Posted by IsoM on December 21, 2001, at 15:16:40

In reply to Re: Asperger's disorder, posted by caroline on December 21, 2001, at 14:45:31

Caroline, I'm eager to talk to any one else who truly has Asperger - not just traits or possible Asperger. I've learned how to deal with my son (he's 26) through trial & error as he wasn't diagnosed till he was 22. There's questions I would love to ask to help me & him understand whether some of his thoughts & actions are specific to him alone, - personality traits as vs Asperger traits.

If you'd rather be private about all things, I can understand. It's something my son wouldn't talk around others unless he knew & trusted them a great deal. But if you would be willing, could you please e-mail me at isomorphix@hotmail.com
I promise I won't ask very personal questions or anything rude. I'm just still continuing my quest to understand him better & he'd love to know more about his nature too. (I have read innummerable books on this subject, some with case histories but it's not the same as comparing & asking.)

>
> Hi,
>
> I have aspergers. I use 75mg remeron, 75mg of anafranil (to help me sleep) + Imovane (zopiclone) taken as a day drug to help me think laterally, deal with social situations etc. I usually take 3x7.5 a day. It all works like a dream; has done for about 18 months now.
>
> Best, Caroline

 

Psychotherapy and CBT

Posted by caroline on December 22, 2001, at 4:13:12

In reply to Asperger's disorder, posted by Elizabeth on December 16, 2001, at 23:15:18

Hi,

Elizabeth, I realised that in my last post I wrote only about the drugs. They are great but I also have weekly psychotherapy and CBT to help me deal with particular issues.

I frequent the OASIS message boards b/c it's great to find that others can empathise with how one feels.

I was not diagnosed until I was 28. Until then I'd been diagnosed with clinical depression, OCD, anorexia, schitzo-typical personality disorder, Bipolar ... the works, basically, and the shrinks would all say, well you don't really fit the criteria for any one of these conditions but we got to diagnose something!

Being diagnosed AS has really helped me, it's allowed me to make sense of my life. I have rarely been depressed since, and the anafranil controls the OCD (which can rule my life if untreated), but apparently OCD is found to be comorbid in 70% of those of us with aspergers.

I suppose some people would say my AS is 'mild' but I don't entirely agree. I function at a high level in many many areas - I'm great socially, have a professional job which I love and I do so well my company are sponsering me through my masters. But in other areas my functioning is very low - I'm finally getting somewhere with learning to drive, but it's taken 13 years, I'm still not overly keen on kissing due to sensory issues and I don't really have friends other than work colleagues because I resent people taking up my spare time which I use to write! It's a strange swiss cheese type of disability, AS!

All the best, and season's greetings from,
Caroline

 

Re: Psychotherapy and CBT caroline

Posted by Dinah on December 22, 2001, at 9:10:31

In reply to Psychotherapy and CBT, posted by caroline on December 22, 2001, at 4:13:12

Wow Caroline,
That last post hit home. I thought I was the only one with difficulties kissing because of sensory problems. I have OCD, and it has been strongly suggested I have schizotypal personality. I've often wondered about Asperger's myself, but isn't the inability to "read" the emotional reactions of others an integral part of the disorder? I am often bombarded by the emotional reactions of others, although I can't seem to do anything with the information. It's like the input is fine (or even oversensitive), but there's something wrong with the processing of it to social output.
I think I also read somewhere that people with Asperger's have trouble seeing the whole of people's faces. That they instead saw eyes and ears and chins, but couldn't put them together. That's what first made me wonder about it in relationship to myself, since that's what happens to me. And I also think I remember something about lack of both social and physical rhythm. But I might be confusing that with something else.
I was just wondering, are there certain qualities that have to be present with Asperger's and that would rule it out if you don't have those qualities?
I'm sorry if this post is muddled. It's still early.

 

Re: Psychotherapy and CBT Dinah

Posted by caroline on December 22, 2001, at 12:02:12

In reply to Re: Psychotherapy and CBT caroline, posted by Dinah on December 22, 2001, at 9:10:31

Hi,

According to DSM IV, I guess there are certain criteria you have to meet to get a diagnosis - if you do a search for aspergers on the net there is a page listing DSM's criteria; I have a print-out of it somewhere, but I'm darned if I can lay my hands on the wretched thing this evening, sorry.

In my opinion, however, from research I have done, and I do work as a psychologist, I don't think it's fair to rule people out if they don't fit DSM, particularly if they are adults, as most of us learn ways of coping. I know many adults who have been told they don't have AS based on DSM criteria. Most of these adults have been made suicidally depressed by their inability to fit in, in the world. I haven't met many adults who fit all of the criteria by the time they get to 25, but if they'd been asked back when they were ten they probably would have.

Have a look on the net for the criteria and go through them, thinking about how you'd have answered ten years ago, even twenty, see how you get on.

I have to say, for what it's worth, finding out I had AS with associated OCD has made my life about a billion times better. I've not suffered depression since I learned more about the disability, and through CBT, psychotherapy and the right combo of drugs (for which I have to thank soley the contributers to this site), I've beaten the insomnia and the OCD. These last 2 years have been the best of my life.

Wishing you all the best, and season's greetings!

Caroline

 

Re: Assessment of Asperger Dinah

Posted by IsoM on December 22, 2001, at 13:28:10

In reply to Re: Psychotherapy and CBT caroline, posted by Dinah on December 22, 2001, at 9:10:31

Dinah, - first a disclaimer from me.
All this comes from long heart-felt conversations with my son, Erin (I know - but it's also a guy's name) & with living with him for 26 years & observing his reactions to situations & always asking him questions about it.

It used to irritate him that I'd ask questions. His reactions to siturations seemed so different to me & I knew something was different about him & I was desperate to understand him better as I love him so much. But when he was diagnosed with Aspeger 4 years ago, he no longer minds me asking as he realises the reasoning behind the questions. He said the questions used to make him feel like he was some sort of freak but he wants to understand himself better too now.

So all in all, I'd say my comments about Asperger are fairly astute but some of them may be specific to him alone & not necessarily all people with Asperger.

He can hug me warmly & often - that sort of contact doesn't bother him. He can shake hands with new people he meets. But any other physical contact disturbs him. Even when younger, if he had sore aching shoulders, he'd refuse to let me massage them but my other 2 sons loved it. I never pushed him about touch. Even as a little child, he wasn't very cuddly after he stopped nursing. My other two sons would've nursed forever if I hadn't weaned them myself, but Erin weaned himself & when I'd ask he wanted "nummies", he say "no!" & run off.

Erin can judge emotions expressed in the face not badly, but it's been through a lot of 'training'. I'm very good at reading people, body language, etc & have taught him. But he does get overwhelmed very easily by the display of too much emotion in others, even good. He has to retire alone to recoup, so to speak. He does have trouble with faces otherwise though.

He, for the life of it, can't ever judge how old a person is unless there's tell-tale signs like wrinkles & gray hair. Once a person is an adult, they look the same sort of. He has a lot of trouble telling the same face with make-up of hair changes done to it. If you were to show him a picture of the same person done with red hair, black hair, & blonde & alter the face with glasses, make-up, etc, he wouldn't know it was the same person, but most everyone else could see the same person. That sort of thing is what he can't judge about faces.

When the psychologist accessed Erin about Asperger, he spent a couple of hours on two separate appointments to run tests & then another appointment to discuss with us the results. Any one who gets 'diagnosed' by reviewing whether they fit some critieria in a manual, hasn't had a thorough job done of it.
\**************************************************************************************************

> Wow Caroline,
> That last post hit home. I thought I was the only one with difficulties kissing because of sensory problems. I have OCD, and it has been strongly suggested I have schizotypal personality. I've often wondered about Asperger's myself, but isn't the inability to "read" the emotional reactions of others an integral part of the disorder? I am often bombarded by the emotional reactions of others, although I can't seem to do anything with the information. It's like the input is fine (or even oversensitive), but there's something wrong with the processing of it to social output.
> I think I also read somewhere that people with Asperger's have trouble seeing the whole of people's faces. That they instead saw eyes and ears and chins, but couldn't put them together. That's what first made me wonder about it in relationship to myself, since that's what happens to me. And I also think I remember something about lack of both social and physical rhythm. But I might be confusing that with something else.
> I was just wondering, are there certain qualities that have to be present with Asperger's and that would rule it out if you don't have those qualities?
> I'm sorry if this post is muddled. It's still early.

 

Re: Assessment of Asperger -Thanks Caroline IsoM

Posted by Dinah on December 22, 2001, at 17:24:13

In reply to Re: Assessment of Asperger Dinah, posted by IsoM on December 22, 2001, at 13:28:10

Thanks for all the information.

I did an internet search and the many of the criteria did look familiar, especially in the more informal descriptions. My husband recognized me in the descriptions as well. The overformal language and concern with precision in language, the social problems (I've been practicing smiling and greeting people), the rocking, the overstimulation, even what I call my "enthusiasms" were all described. It doesn't look like a bad thing though, just different.

I will definitely do more research on this and bring it up with my doctor next time I see him, if I have the courage. When you read the description of something, it's all too easy to think you have it. And there does seem to be some overlap with OCD and especially schizotypal personality disorder in the criteria.

Thanks again.
Dinah

 

Re: Assessment of Asperger -Thanks Caroline IsoM Dinah

Posted by IsoM on December 23, 2001, at 1:23:34

In reply to Re: Assessment of Asperger -Thanks Caroline IsoM, posted by Dinah on December 22, 2001, at 17:24:13

Dianh, you say "It doesn't look like a bad thing though, just different."
I'm so glad you said that - I consider it the right way to look at it. My son doesn't mind having Asperger now that he knows what it is. I also have certain Asperger-type qualities but have no problems being around people. I really like it but can get overstimulated very easy.

So many Asperger qualities are wonderful to have & my son said he feels sorry for those who have difficulties with things that's a breeze for him. The only thing that bothers him is his desire to find a soul-mate & his difficulty to connect that way.

If you do find that you are diagnosed with Asperger (or even if you're just different), celebrate the differences with pride & not shame! Society needs to learn that sameness is not necessarily desirable.

> Thanks for all the information.
>
> I did an internet search and the many of the criteria did look familiar, especially in the more informal descriptions. My husband recognized me in the descriptions as well. The overformal language and concern with precision in language, the social problems (I've been practicing smiling and greeting people), the rocking, the overstimulation, even what I call my "enthusiasms" were all described. It doesn't look like a bad thing though, just different.
>
> I will definitely do more research on this and bring it up with my doctor next time I see him, if I have the courage. When you read the description of something, it's all too easy to think you have it. And there does seem to be some overlap with OCD and especially schizotypal personality disorder in the criteria.
>
> Thanks again.
> Dinah


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