Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 75697

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Re: Cam! Zo

Posted by Cam W. on August 21, 2001, at 23:21:38

In reply to Cam! , posted by Zo on August 21, 2001, at 22:41:59

Zo - I sorry, but both the FDA and Health Canada ARE trying to stop the import of medications, without a doctor's approval through legal channels, from coming into the respective countries. If one doesn't want to have every out of country importation, be it meds, illicit animal skins, CDs, legal books, clothes, etc., from being flagged by customs, I would suggest not to order prescription medication from foreign countries. Chances are, the medications will be sent back, and I doubt that you will get a refund.

Yes, we are all adults, but we also should not be taking medications without someone with an objective stance (ie. our doctors) watching over us. This is dangerous and could potentially be lifethreatening. We are not doctors; therefore we should not be prescribing medications, especially for ourselves. Doctors are not even supposed to presribe for themselves. They are not using objective reasoning when self-prescribing, and neither are we.

- Cam


 

*Legal* medication importation-the process? Cam W.

Posted by Mitch on August 22, 2001, at 0:01:19

In reply to Re: Cam! Zo, posted by Cam W. on August 21, 2001, at 23:21:38

Cam,

Can you illustrate (by example) what the process would be in *legally* obtaining the med (i.e.-meclobomide) for a patient-regardless of insurance being willing to pay for the cost, etc., if the patient/doctor are both US residents and they want to get the med from Canada? I am ready for a trial of a RIMA, and the US is way behind everybody else in newer MAOI's.

Mitch

 

Re: *Legal* medication importation-the process? Mitch

Posted by Cam W. on August 22, 2001, at 0:25:52

In reply to *Legal* medication importation-the process? Cam W., posted by Mitch on August 22, 2001, at 0:01:19

Mitch - I don't know what you have to do in the U.S., but in Canada, your doctor has to write Health Canada with the request. The doc has to be able to show that all of the available medications have been given a reasonable trial, or valid reasons why they have not all been tried. Also, the doctor must provide information on why he/she thinks that the drug to be imported may work, where available drugs haven't.

Perhaps contact the FDA to find out what their procedure is. - Cam

 

Re: *Legal* medication importation-the process?

Posted by LyndaK on August 22, 2001, at 1:30:24

In reply to Re: *Legal* medication importation-the process? Mitch, posted by Cam W. on August 22, 2001, at 0:25:52

this is an interesting discussion. The concern of self-medicating is a good one. That's not what I'm doing. I've discussed this with my doctor. He said he would see what he could find out about the drug. From my own research, it sounds like Adrafinil is similar to Modafinil, which my doctor has already prescribed but which I don't tolerate well.

I received the adrafinil in the mail today -- no problem. I've never ordered anything from another country before, so all the stickers on the outside of the package are...well...foreign :)...to me. There's a green sticker on the back that says "Customs" on the top. It looks like it was filled out by the supplier. The contents are decribed as "supplements". Inside the package was the Adrafinil along with two sheets of paper. One paper provided information about the drug. The other paper, entitled "American Personal Importation Statement of Fact", informed me of my "constitutional right" to import this product.

I have more research to do. I looked up the FDA's website but didn't really find the information that answered my questions.

And why am I even going to all this trouble in the first place? I am desparate to feel whole and healthy again. Merely being free of suicidal ideations is not enough. Zoloft has brought me only so far, and created a few problems in the process. Reading the various threads here has introduced me to options I haven't yet tried.

Lynda


> Mitch - I don't know what you have to do in the U.S., but in Canada, your doctor has to write Health Canada with the request. The doc has to be able to show that all of the available medications have been given a reasonable trial, or valid reasons why they have not all been tried. Also, the doctor must provide information on why he/she thinks that the drug to be imported may work, where available drugs haven't.
>
> Perhaps contact the FDA to find out what their procedure is. - Cam

 

Re: Cam! Cam W.

Posted by Zo on August 22, 2001, at 2:01:42

In reply to Re: Cam! Zo, posted by Cam W. on August 21, 2001, at 23:21:38

I'm not "self-medicating" either. .. but I've seen stories on this board where people are a damn sight better off, if the point is to reduce suffering and get well, following other people's suggestions rather than some dopey MDs idea. . .So have you.

My pdoc knows what I do, we work together.. .but I'm *lucky,* Cam. He's an open-minded guy, who puts people before bureaucracy -- within reason. He won't rx Desoxyn, for example, says it would be like calling up the FDA and saying Would you please go thru all my records?

It just doesn't make any *sense* to characterize what's going on here in negative ways like Self-medicating, shame shame.

Zo

 

Americans buying medicine in Canada

Posted by Craig on August 22, 2001, at 2:46:14

In reply to Re: *Legal* medication importation-the process? Mitch, posted by Cam W. on August 22, 2001, at 0:25:52

"Although any citizen with a prescription from a U.S. doctor can cross over to Canada to purchase medication for themselves, they must first get the prescription endorsed by a Canadian doctor." This article http://www.freep.com/news/health/canam21_20010821.htm was in the Detroit Free Press yesterday and explains the procedure.

=================================================
> Mitch - I don't know what you have to do in the U.S., but in Canada, your doctor has to write Health Canada with the request. The doc has to be able to show that all of the available medications have been given a reasonable trial, or valid reasons why they have not all been tried. Also, the doctor must provide information on why he/she thinks that the drug to be imported may work, where available drugs haven't.
>
> Perhaps contact the FDA to find out what their procedure is. - Cam

 

Re: Importation is OK

Posted by JohnL on August 22, 2001, at 3:13:48

In reply to Where to buy foreign antidepressants, posted by SalArmy4me on August 20, 2001, at 15:17:13

Interesting thread this is. I just thought I would put in my 2 cents. I happen to approve of someone importing their own meds. Maybe it is illegal in Canada, but it is not illegal in the USA. A 90 day supply can be legally imported. Actually the border lines between what is legal and illegal are kind of fuzzy, but at this point the DEA and the FDA do allow it. And it's a good thing. There are people who would otherwise still be suffering otherwise, but are now enjoying vastly improved lives.

Lots of people have imported foreign meds, mostly dopamine or norepinephrine medicines. I am not aware of a single case where any damage was done.

Someone else mentioned that many people here are grown up and they know what they are doing. I happen to agree with that. The ones who are totally ignorant are not usually found at this site, and are not the ones who will take the leap and order their own meds.

The body doesn't know and doesn't care who prescribed the drug. If the patient self administered the drug, or if a doctor did it, the body doesn't know or care. Someone would have to be real careless to do themselves any harm by self administering a med imported from another country.

And finally, the real potentially dangerous drugs, such as MAOIs, stimulants, and benzos, cannot be legally imported. Though it can be done with a huge amount of effort, it is nearly impossible.

I think people at psychobabble happen to know more about their own condition and their own meds than do the doctors. I have much more faith in a patient's own decisions than a doctor's decision. If the doctors were so darn good and all knowing, this site would have no purpose to exist.
John


 

Re: Americans buying medicine in Canada Craig

Posted by Mitch on August 22, 2001, at 9:26:48

In reply to Americans buying medicine in Canada, posted by Craig on August 22, 2001, at 2:46:14

> "Although any citizen with a prescription from a U.S. doctor can cross over to Canada to purchase medication for themselves, they must first get the prescription endorsed by a Canadian doctor." This article http://www.freep.com/news/health/canam21_20010821.htm was in the Detroit Free Press yesterday and explains the procedure.
>
> =================================================
> > Mitch - I don't know what you have to do in the U.S., but in Canada, your doctor has to write Health Canada with the request. The doc has to be able to show that all of the available medications have been given a reasonable trial, or valid reasons why they have not all been tried. Also, the doctor must provide information on why he/she thinks that the drug to be imported may work, where available drugs haven't.
> >
> > Perhaps contact the FDA to find out what their procedure is. - Cam

Thanks Craig and Cam,

I see there is one way to obtain a med not currently approved by the FDA here-I need a Canadian doctor to approve it along with my doctor, and I have to physically go to Canada and fill it in a Canadian pharmacy and then physically return to the US. There may be some other allowances but I haven't found anything about them-any that will hold water legally.

Mitch

 

Re: Self Medicating NikkiT2

Posted by Jane D on August 22, 2001, at 11:04:40

In reply to Re: Where to buy foreign antidepressants Jane D, posted by NikkiT2 on August 21, 2001, at 17:26:11

> You are obviously very self aware, and able to make yourself knowledgable. Sal even stated that one site didnt ask for prescriptions.
>
> Some drugs *need* monitoring, such as lithium. What if they were buying potentially dangeous drugs, or self medicating themselves a dangerous combination. What about MAOI's with no doctor prescribing them and detailing their dangers.
>
> It just really worries me.
>
> Nikki
>

Nikki,
I can think of another downside you didn't mention. Even if you are rational enough to make these decisions initially, many of these drugs have the potential to muddle your thinking as a side effect. You need someone (not necessarily a doctor) to say "Uh, You're acting a little weird these days".

But one problem with arguing that whether or not a drug is prescription is all that matters is that this is not a constant. You told us that benzo's were available OTC in Thailand. Does this mean they are OK to be used unsupervised there but not in the US? I doubt that even similar countries like the US, UK and Canada agree completely on which drugs are which.

And does the nature of a drug really change over time. The new antihistamines are prescriptions only in the US. Doctors have said they should be OTC but the drugs companies are contesting it. They would have to charge less but they claim it is about the need for medical monitoring.

Jane

By the way what was Thailand like? Did the availability of Benzos change the way they were used?

 

Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing Cam W.

Posted by Jane D on August 22, 2001, at 11:21:47

In reply to Re: Cam! Zo, posted by Cam W. on August 21, 2001, at 23:21:38

> Zo - I sorry, but both the FDA and Health Canada ARE trying to stop the import of medications, without a doctor's approval through legal channels, from coming into the respective countries.

Cam,
OK. You've made a good point. People should know what the risks are even if they are not that great (US only) at the moment. In the US this is a grey area as JohnL said. Most of the time customs lets drugs through. Sometimes they seize them. But that ambiguity can't last and the first time we hear that it has changed will be when Customs starts seizing shipments AND prosecuting.

And if you decide to take the risk make sure you know what category your drugs fall into! The ban on importing scheduled drugs is not at all a grey area!

Jane

 

Re: Americans buying medicine in Canada Mitch

Posted by SalArmy4me on August 22, 2001, at 13:38:22

In reply to Re: Americans buying medicine in Canada Craig, posted by Mitch on August 22, 2001, at 9:26:48

You can save yourself a lot of trouble by buying it without a prescription
I ordered Tianeptine and Reboxetine and got good products.

 

Re: Americans buying medicine in Canada

Posted by JohnL on August 22, 2001, at 16:51:01

In reply to Re: Americans buying medicine in Canada Craig, posted by Mitch on August 22, 2001, at 9:26:48

I once tried Moclobemide, before I found it on the web. I went through the whole routine in Canada. I live 5 hours away. I drove there, saw a Canadian doctor who prescribed it for me, and then got the prescription filled at the pharmacy next door. Crossing the border back into the US I had to show a copy of the prescription and a copy of my receipt for the doctor visit.

It's so much easier just to order it online.
John

 

Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing

Posted by JohnL on August 22, 2001, at 17:11:01

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing Cam W., posted by Jane D on August 22, 2001, at 11:21:52


In the USA it is legal to import medications under the following constraints:
1. They are for personal use and not for resale.
2. They are not commercially promoted.
3. They are of less than 3 months supply.
4. They are not classified as controlled substances.

Here's something real interesting. Did you know...that any government official who tries to deny an American their right to import legally within the above contraints can be fined up to $10,000 and imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both. 18USCC Section 241 and 242.

In other words, it is not the patient who is at risk of going to jail for importing a legal unscheduled medication, but rather any government official who stands in the way who is at risk of going to jail, especially if they haven't studied basic laws that apply to them.

 

Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing JohnL

Posted by Cam W. on August 22, 2001, at 17:32:59

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing, posted by JohnL on August 22, 2001, at 17:11:01

John - In Canada, the importation of medications requires a doctor's prescription and indications for use. What is the big to-do in the U.S. with the FDA clamp down on importing medication from interent sites without a prescription? Does the FDA directive only cover medications in the US that are already available on prescription?

Still, it seems to me that self medication is risky (but that is only my personal observation). What if someone became (oh, let's say) manic from using unprescribed medications from overseas and caused harm to someone else? I doubt that the person would be exempt from prosecution, because the medication they were taking was not prescribed to them. I guess it would be treated much the same as an alcohol-related incident. I don't think that (for me) the liability would be worth the risk.

Thinking out loud. - Cam
>
> In the USA it is legal to import medications under the following constraints:
> 1. They are for personal use and not for resale.
> 2. They are not commercially promoted.
> 3. They are of less than 3 months supply.
> 4. They are not classified as controlled substances.
>
> Here's something real interesting. Did you know...that any government official who tries to deny an American their right to import legally within the above contraints can be fined up to $10,000 and imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both. 18USCC Section 241 and 242.
>
> In other words, it is not the patient who is at risk of going to jail for importing a legal unscheduled medication, but rather any government official who stands in the way who is at risk of going to jail, especially if they haven't studied basic laws that apply to them.

 

Re: Americans buying medicine in Canada SalArmy4me

Posted by Mitch on August 22, 2001, at 23:24:07

In reply to Re: Americans buying medicine in Canada Mitch, posted by SalArmy4me on August 22, 2001, at 13:38:22

> You can save yourself a lot of trouble by buying it without a prescription
> I ordered Tianeptine and Reboxetine and got good products.

I will discuss it with my pdoc as an option. If I get a thumbs up I will consider it. Price is also a consideration :) (no pun intended)

Thanks,

Mitch

 

Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing JohnL

Posted by Mitch on August 22, 2001, at 23:53:53

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing, posted by JohnL on August 22, 2001, at 17:07:44

>
> In the USA it is legal to import medications under the following constraints:
> 1. They are for personal use and not for resale.
> 2. They are not commercially promoted.
> 3. They are of less than 3 months supply.
> 4. They are not classified as controlled substances.
>
> Here's something real interesting. Did you know...that any government official who tries to deny an American their right to import legally within the above contraints can be fined up to $10,000 and imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both. 18USCC Section 241 and 242.

John,

Thanks for that info. If my pdoc feels comfortable with prescribing it (as if it would have been available in the US), then it is an option I will consider. However, I wouldn't be surprised if most pdocs would not even think of it because it would place the legal burden on them for condoning a patient to take unapproved meds. If I flip-out or have a stroke, i.e., my pdoc could be held liable and would have little protection. And if I go behind my pdoc's back and import the meds and self-medicate that wrecks the doctor patient relationship. I think it would be a lot easier if Canada and the U.S could become more of a "common market" with respect to newer meds being available to their respective populaces without getting medical mullahs and pharmaceutical companies doing battle at everybody's expense. Do I sniff something here called NAFTA??

Mitch

 

Cam's got a point.

Posted by Daveman on August 23, 2001, at 1:48:51

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing JohnL, posted by Cam W. on August 22, 2001, at 17:32:59

I understand the frustrations expressed by many on this Board. I freely acknowledge many of you have more intractible problems than I- or maybe I just have good docs who chose the right "cocktail" for me. Still, I think Cam has a good point in stating that choosing one's own meds without a doctor's input or monitoring is asking for trouble. Not only that, you don't have any guarantee that the foriegn meds you are ordering are even safe to take- and those prices! I've gone to some of those sites out of curiosity. One had Atarax for $275, 50 tabs. It's available generically, for Pete's sake!

So I think it's better to try and find a doctor you can work with and trust rather than to try doctoring yourself. My two cents anyway.

Dave

 

Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing

Posted by JohnL on August 23, 2001, at 3:38:31

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing JohnL, posted by Cam W. on August 22, 2001, at 17:32:59

Every decision we ever make in life has benefits and risks. I think any risks of self importation or self medication are rather small. The potential benefits far outweight the potential risks, by a long shot. Heck, just getting in your car to go to work is far more dangerous than ordering a med from overseas. But you still get in your car anyway.

It's all about risk vs benefit. For those of us who support self directed care, we see more benefit than risk. For those of you who do not support self directed care, you perceive more risk than benefit apparently. The only thing is that in dozens of cases here at this board of self directed care, not one single bad thing has happened. I'm sure someday something will. But even if/when it does, the track record is very impressive. It just so happens that people who self medicate are very experienced and they understand and respect the risks, resulting in responsible behavior.

I have seen more bad things happen due to drugs doctors prescribed, but no bad things happen from self directed drugs. Just my opinion, but the benefits far outweigh the risks, by a long shot.

It isn't the right direction to go for everyone though.
John

 

Canadian meds and a link

Posted by Collete on August 23, 2001, at 6:18:31

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing, posted by JohnL on August 23, 2001, at 3:38:31

> Every decision we ever make in life has benefits and risks. I think any risks of self importation or self medication are rather small. The potential benefits far outweight the potential risks, by a long shot. Heck, just getting in your car to go to work is far more dangerous than ordering a med from overseas. But you still get in your car anyway.
>
> It's all about risk vs benefit. For those of us who support self directed care, we see more benefit than risk. For those of you who do not support self directed care, you perceive more risk than benefit apparently. The only thing is that in dozens of cases here at this board of self directed care, not one single bad thing has happened. I'm sure someday something will. But even if/when it does, the track record is very impressive. It just so happens that people who self medicate are very experienced and they understand and respect the risks, resulting in responsible behavior.
>
> I have seen more bad things happen due to drugs doctors prescribed, but no bad things happen from self directed drugs. Just my opinion, but the benefits far outweigh the risks, by a long shot.
>
> It isn't the right direction to go for everyone though.
> John

Check out www.canadadrugs.com. My mother has started getting her meds there. Seniors, as you know, have no script coverage and some of her medications cost hundreds of dollars. I have no insurance for "mental" and my script for Zyprexa was $194 for 34 pills! Canadadrugs quotes:60 (2.5) for $122. Generic Prozac is $105 for 100 pills( all strengths) I am going to get scripts from my pdoc and mail them in.

 

Re: Self Medicating Jane D

Posted by NikkiT2 on August 23, 2001, at 15:35:32

In reply to Re: Self Medicating NikkiT2, posted by Jane D on August 22, 2001, at 11:04:40

Thailand was heavenly!! i can't wait to return!!!

As far as the benzos.. yup, they are a huge recreational drug out there. I limited mine and only used them for travelling (8 hours on crmaped mini bus and I needed them!) but I came across alot of people taking them "for fun". One particular guy was taking 80mg a day!!!! he took benzos all day, and then uppers (diet pills also available over counter) all evening... then next day cycle resumed... Most people I spoke to were taking benzos daily, and 3 people I became friendly with all admitted they had a benzo problem - ie, were addicted!!!

So, yeah, the fact that they were available made everyone take them... They worked out 10p (UK) per 10mg, so they were very affordable too!

I'm not going to argue whether because a med is available in x country, it should be availablke to those in y country... I just think ALL meds should be taken under doctor supervision!

Nikki x

> > You are obviously very self aware, and able to make yourself knowledgable. Sal even stated that one site didnt ask for prescriptions.
> >
> > Some drugs *need* monitoring, such as lithium. What if they were buying potentially dangeous drugs, or self medicating themselves a dangerous combination. What about MAOI's with no doctor prescribing them and detailing their dangers.
> >
> > It just really worries me.
> >
> > Nikki
> >
>
> Nikki,
> I can think of another downside you didn't mention. Even if you are rational enough to make these decisions initially, many of these drugs have the potential to muddle your thinking as a side effect. You need someone (not necessarily a doctor) to say "Uh, You're acting a little weird these days".
>
> But one problem with arguing that whether or not a drug is prescription is all that matters is that this is not a constant. You told us that benzo's were available OTC in Thailand. Does this mean they are OK to be used unsupervised there but not in the US? I doubt that even similar countries like the US, UK and Canada agree completely on which drugs are which.
>
> And does the nature of a drug really change over time. The new antihistamines are prescriptions only in the US. Doctors have said they should be OTC but the drugs companies are contesting it. They would have to charge less but they claim it is about the need for medical monitoring.
>
> Jane
>
> By the way what was Thailand like? Did the availability of Benzos change the way they were used?

 

Re: Thailand NikkiT2

Posted by Jane D on August 23, 2001, at 20:45:19

In reply to Re: Self Medicating Jane D, posted by NikkiT2 on August 23, 2001, at 15:35:32

> Thailand was heavenly!! i can't wait to return!!!
>
> As far as the benzos.. yup, they are a huge recreational drug out there. I limited mine and only used them for travelling (8 hours on crmaped mini bus and I needed them!) but I came across alot of people taking them "for fun". One particular guy was taking 80mg a day!!!! he took benzos all day, and then uppers (diet pills also available over counter) all evening... then next day cycle resumed... Most people I spoke to were taking benzos daily, and 3 people I became friendly with all admitted they had a benzo problem - ie, were addicted!!!
>
> So, yeah, the fact that they were available made everyone take them... They worked out 10p (UK) per 10mg, so they were very affordable too!
>

Nikki,
Thanks for the information. Do you think that these drugs are used there the way we use alcohol or is it something additional?
...

> I'm not going to argue whether because a med is available in x country, it should be availablke to those in y country... I just think ALL meds should be taken under doctor supervision!
>
> Nikki x
>

Ok. We won't argue about it. But I like to know how these things work in other countries and appreciate your description. I guess the general assumption that Americans are totally ignorant of the rest of the world stings a bit (even though it's true of me).

Jane

 

Re: self-directed drugs JohnL

Posted by LyndaK on August 23, 2001, at 21:37:12

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing, posted by JohnL on August 23, 2001, at 3:38:31

I'm new to this board, but the few things I've read authored by you, John, lead me to believe that biochemistry is an interest of yours. You seem to have confidence in your understanding of the way different drugs work. That gives you some confidence in your ability to select which drugs to try. I, on the other hand, have little knowledge in that area. I rely on my doctor's knowledge in that area...particularly if I'm on more than one drug. Although rare, some adverse reactions are fatal. I feel that I reduce the risk of serious adverse reactions by trusting my doctor's knowledge of biochemistry/pharmacology. If we start talking about a new drug, I give him a review of what I'm already on. (I don't trust him to look it up in my chart). I also draw upon his experience with other clients, although being introduced to this site has greatly expanded that particular advantage.

Just another perspective. :)
Lynda

> Every decision we ever make in life has benefits and risks. I think any risks of self importation or self medication are rather small. The potential benefits far outweight the potential risks, by a long shot. Heck, just getting in your car to go to work is far more dangerous than ordering a med from overseas. But you still get in your car anyway.
>
> It's all about risk vs benefit. For those of us who support self directed care, we see more benefit than risk. For those of you who do not support self directed care, you perceive more risk than benefit apparently. The only thing is that in dozens of cases here at this board of self directed care, not one single bad thing has happened. I'm sure someday something will. But even if/when it does, the track record is very impressive. It just so happens that people who self medicate are very experienced and they understand and respect the risks, resulting in responsible behavior.
>
> I have seen more bad things happen due to drugs doctors prescribed, but no bad things happen from self directed drugs. Just my opinion, but the benefits far outweigh the risks, by a long shot.
>
> It isn't the right direction to go for everyone though.
> John

 

Re: Thailand Jane D

Posted by NikkiT2 on August 24, 2001, at 13:04:34

In reply to Re: Thailand NikkiT2, posted by Jane D on August 23, 2001, at 20:45:19

Alcohol is used faily heavily out there.. the Thai "whisky" contains anphetamine of some form and is drunk any time of day or night... None of the Thai people I got to know used benzo's, but they did use the diet pills faily heavily, and most drunk a fair amount too!!! It seemed to be westeners who knew how to abuse something so well though!!!

Was very strange to be able to buy what ever you fanbcied over the counter (Viagara was also pretty cheap and according the lady that ran the pharamcy I was using, is in quite heavy demand)

Hope that helps your quest for knowledge :o)

Nikki x


> > Thailand was heavenly!! i can't wait to return!!!
> >
> > As far as the benzos.. yup, they are a huge recreational drug out there. I limited mine and only used them for travelling (8 hours on crmaped mini bus and I needed them!) but I came across alot of people taking them "for fun". One particular guy was taking 80mg a day!!!! he took benzos all day, and then uppers (diet pills also available over counter) all evening... then next day cycle resumed... Most people I spoke to were taking benzos daily, and 3 people I became friendly with all admitted they had a benzo problem - ie, were addicted!!!
> >
> > So, yeah, the fact that they were available made everyone take them... They worked out 10p (UK) per 10mg, so they were very affordable too!
> >
>
> Nikki,
> Thanks for the information. Do you think that these drugs are used there the way we use alcohol or is it something additional?
> ...
>
> > I'm not going to argue whether because a med is available in x country, it should be availablke to those in y country... I just think ALL meds should be taken under doctor supervision!
> >
> > Nikki x
> >
>
> Ok. We won't argue about it. But I like to know how these things work in other countries and appreciate your description. I guess the general assumption that Americans are totally ignorant of the rest of the world stings a bit (even though it's true of me).
>
> Jane

 

Dangers of Self-Medication

Posted by Rosa on August 25, 2001, at 7:34:15

In reply to Re: Cam! - Advisability and Legality of Importing, posted by JohnL on August 23, 2001, at 3:38:31

What are the dangers of self-medication?

At one time I had taken Lithium by prescription successfully, I thought. When I asked for it again, I found that I couldn't take it. Then I was prescribed Lithobid and found that I could not take it either. I stopped taking it due to adverse reactions. That does not mean that I was addicted to it, it merely means that I could not take it.

I am currently taking Trazadone. I usually take it at night but not on a regular basis. [My doctor informed me that I could only take it for sleep that way and that I could not take it for depression unless I took it as prescribed.] Recently, I told my doctor that I could not take it in the morning because I felt so bad. He told me to take it earlier in the evening or to cut it in half. I hadn't thought of that.

I have decided to utilize alternative medicines (herbs) and find that some of these cannot be taken concurrently with medication. Also, some herbs cannot be taken together.

I suggest getting a Nursing Drug Handbook if you don't have one. The PDR Family Guide to Prescription Drugs also very informative.

I also recommend Prescription for Nutritional Healing by James and Phyllis Balch. I also like the books put out by Prevention Magazine.

You may want to check your medications for Drug Interactions at www.drkoop.com. See the Drug Checker.

Rosa


> It's all about risk vs benefit. For those of us who support self directed care, we see more benefit than risk. For those of you who do not support self directed care, you perceive more risk than benefit apparently.

John

 

Re: Dangers of Self-Medication

Posted by JLenoir on August 26, 2003, at 13:11:15

In reply to Dangers of Self-Medication, posted by Rosa on August 25, 2001, at 7:34:15

With regard to medicine from Canada, there is a way to get prescription medication at significant savings. Because it is an above-board company, you submit a brief medical history and they will fill American prescriptions. A Canadian doctor will review your file and approve the prescription under his Canadian license. It is legal to order up to a 90 day supply via mail. The savings are significant. I would be happy to help you make the connection if anyone is interested.


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