Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 47055

Shown: posts 1 to 16 of 16. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?

Posted by Buffet on October 22, 2000, at 4:08:07

It wasn't named because it deals with GABA receptors or GABA itself was it? If so I am very interested in how it works.

Also, does neurontin have sedative qualities to it? Still looking for something to take place of xanax. My only option is to go back onto another ssri (the only thing that kinda works).

Does anybody know of any research on drugs that increase the production of GABA? Or, act as an 'sGri'. This would put an end to the dependence to benzos.

 

Re: Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?

Posted by SLS on October 22, 2000, at 11:59:56

In reply to Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?, posted by Buffet on October 22, 2000, at 4:08:07

> It wasn't named because it deals with GABA receptors or GABA itself was it? If so I am very interested in how it works.
>
> Also, does neurontin have sedative qualities to it? Still looking for something to take place of xanax. My only option is to go back onto another ssri (the only thing that kinda works).
>
> Does anybody know of any research on drugs that increase the production of GABA? Or, act as an 'sGri'. This would put an end to the dependence to benzos.

Hi Buffet.

Yes, gabapentin (Neurontin) was probably named for its structural similarity to the GABA (gamma-amino-butyric-acid) molecule. It was designed that way on purpose. However, it doesn't act at all like GABA. The body does not treat gabapentin as if it were GABA. However, it does seem to have properties that probably lead to an enhancement of GABA-type activity. One of the earlier ideas regarding gabapentin is that it increased the production of GABA, just as you suggested. But it also does a whole bunch of other things that may account for its therapeutic effects. Neurontin is actually a pretty poorly understood drug.

Neurontin does have significant anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) effects in many people. Perhaps it will be able to replace your Xanax, or reduce the amount of Xanax you need. Neurontin can reduce anxiety without producing sedation.

As is often pointed out here, there is nothing inherently wrong with "depending" on a drug, whether it be Prozac, lithium, Neurontin, or Xanax. Some people have to take these drugs for the rest of their lives. I'm not sure it makes sense to think of a benzodiazepine any differently than an SSRI. You need to take both regularly. If you stop either, there are significant withdrawal syndromes. I guess the real issue with a specific benzodiazepine is whether or not it has lost its effectiveness (tolerance) for you or if you don't like the way you feel while taking it. Without knowing anything about you, I would say that if your doctor feels Neurontin is worth a try, I would not be hesitant.

Good luck.


- Scott

 

Gabapentin/Xanax/Celexa? SLS

Posted by Buffet on October 22, 2000, at 16:09:02

In reply to Re: Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?, posted by SLS on October 22, 2000, at 11:59:56

.....
> As is often pointed out here, there is nothing inherently wrong with "depending" on a drug, whether it be Prozac, lithium, Neurontin, or Xanax. Some people have to take these drugs for the rest of their lives. I'm not sure it makes sense to think of a benzodiazepine any differently than an SSRI. You need to take both regularly. If you stop either, there are significant withdrawal syndromes. I guess the real issue with a specific benzodiazepine is whether or not it has lost its effectiveness (tolerance) for you or if you don't like the way you feel while taking it. Without knowing anything about you, I would say that if your doctor feels Neurontin is worth a try, I would not be hesitant.
> - Scott


Thanks for the imput. The gaba part of its name rang a bell and i started to wonder. Do you or anyone else know how it is metabolized? I have read in other posts that it is metabolized by the liver. I have a semi-high liver function which does bother me a bit, but at the time the test was taken I was drinking and abusing other abusables...but I'm clean now, except for my nasty benzo habit! - :) No, I know there is nothing wrong with being dependant upon a drug as long as it is helping you to function. I guess my problem is the tolerance issue, liver load, and immediate and very uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms associated with alprazolam. Also, I can't get refills! I have to call the doc once a month to get it called into the pharmacy, and if I forget to call, or if the doc forgets to call (this happens all the time) I go cold turkey for a day or so.

Now, it is also starting to turn into winter and as usuall my mood is going to hell. I'm thinking of switching back onto an ssri (again). How does Celexa work in comparision with prozac and zoloft? Proxac has a long duration, zoloft kicks in within a few days, so is Celexa more on the prozac or zoloft side? Is it an energizing AD like Prozac and Zoloft? Should I even be comparing it to them? Notice I'm leaving paxil out of the equation here because of its side effects - > drowsiness, fatigue, etc. I've tried almost all other AD's and the ssri's work the best for me. My list - prozac, zoloft, wellbutrin, paxil, effexor, amitriptylin, trazodone, depakote, ativan, xanax, ritalin, and buspar.

Need as much info on celexa (personal experiences from people who have had positive to ok experience with prozac, zoloft and then switched to celexa). I need a side by side comparision.

Also, any more info on gabapentin (dosage) would be helpful.

I am going to see a pdoc in about two weeks and need to get fixed before attempting school again starting this winter.

Thanks all, and Scott for the GAb info

Buffet.

 

Re: Gabapentin/Xanax/Celexa?

Posted by SLS on October 22, 2000, at 17:36:33

In reply to Gabapentin/Xanax/Celexa? SLS, posted by Buffet on October 22, 2000, at 16:09:02

Hi Buffet.

I think you are on the right track pursuing an SSRI for seasonal mood problems. I'll defer comments regarding the differences between the SSRIs to others who have more experience in this area.

As far as Neurontin (gabapentin) is concerned, it is not metabolized by the body at all. The liver never sees it. It is excreted through the urine unchanged. It is simply flushed out.


- Scott


> .....
> > As is often pointed out here, there is nothing inherently wrong with "depending" on a drug, whether it be Prozac, lithium, Neurontin, or Xanax. Some people have to take these drugs for the rest of their lives. I'm not sure it makes sense to think of a benzodiazepine any differently than an SSRI. You need to take both regularly. If you stop either, there are significant withdrawal syndromes. I guess the real issue with a specific benzodiazepine is whether or not it has lost its effectiveness (tolerance) for you or if you don't like the way you feel while taking it. Without knowing anything about you, I would say that if your doctor feels Neurontin is worth a try, I would not be hesitant.
> > - Scott
>
>
> Thanks for the imput. The gaba part of its name rang a bell and i started to wonder. Do you or anyone else know how it is metabolized? I have read in other posts that it is metabolized by the liver. I have a semi-high liver function which does bother me a bit, but at the time the test was taken I was drinking and abusing other abusables...but I'm clean now, except for my nasty benzo habit! - :) No, I know there is nothing wrong with being dependant upon a drug as long as it is helping you to function. I guess my problem is the tolerance issue, liver load, and immediate and very uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms associated with alprazolam. Also, I can't get refills! I have to call the doc once a month to get it called into the pharmacy, and if I forget to call, or if the doc forgets to call (this happens all the time) I go cold turkey for a day or so.
>
> Now, it is also starting to turn into winter and as usuall my mood is going to hell. I'm thinking of switching back onto an ssri (again). How does Celexa work in comparision with prozac and zoloft? Proxac has a long duration, zoloft kicks in within a few days, so is Celexa more on the prozac or zoloft side? Is it an energizing AD like Prozac and Zoloft? Should I even be comparing it to them? Notice I'm leaving paxil out of the equation here because of its side effects - > drowsiness, fatigue, etc. I've tried almost all other AD's and the ssri's work the best for me. My list - prozac, zoloft, wellbutrin, paxil, effexor, amitriptylin, trazodone, depakote, ativan, xanax, ritalin, and buspar.
>
> Need as much info on celexa (personal experiences from people who have had positive to ok experience with prozac, zoloft and then switched to celexa). I need a side by side comparision.
>
> Also, any more info on gabapentin (dosage) would be helpful.
>
> I am going to see a pdoc in about two weeks and need to get fixed before attempting school again starting this winter.
>
> Thanks all, and Scott for the GAb info
>
> Buffet.

 

Re: Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA? Buffet

Posted by Snowie on October 22, 2000, at 19:06:55

In reply to Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?, posted by Buffet on October 22, 2000, at 4:08:07

Buffet,

Just to add to what the others have said, my understanding is that Neurontin (gabapentin) is an anticonvulsant, not an SSRI, even though it may also act as an antianxiety agent and mood stabilizer in some people. I've been taking Xanax for over 5 years, and I noticed a difference immediately when I started taking Neurontin, i.e., I didn't need as much Xanax. Strangely enough, often Neurontin has worked better than Xanax on anxiety. I don't know why Neurontin has had this effect on me. There may be some side effects at some point since my pdoc will ask me if I've noticed any increased irritation, depersonalization, or memory loss. So far, I haven't noticed those side effects, but I'm taking a small amount of Neurontin, even though my pdoc has recently increased the dose to 600 mg. (200 mg. x 3) per day. Hopefully, there will be no side effects.

Snowie

> It wasn't named because it deals with GABA receptors or GABA itself was it? If so I am very interested in how it works.
>
> Also, does neurontin have sedative qualities to it? Still looking for something to take place of xanax. My only option is to go back onto another ssri (the only thing that kinda works).
>
> Does anybody know of any research on drugs that increase the production of GABA? Or, act as an 'sGri'. This would put an end to the dependence to benzos.

 

Re: Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?

Posted by Margy on October 23, 2000, at 8:22:24

In reply to Re: Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?, posted by SLS on October 22, 2000, at 11:59:56

I took Nerontin for a one week period and found it to be very much a sedative. I felt/thought very fuzzy while taking it. I figured my body would eventually adapt to it and I wouldn't be so foggy.
I gave it try because it is suppose to help with Fibromyalgia. I did, however, have to stop taking it because my skin became extraordinarily dry, red and itchy just within the short period of time that I took it. Within a few days of being off it my skin went back to normal.

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice

Posted by dove on October 25, 2000, at 11:43:51

In reply to Re: Does gabapentin have anything to do with GABA?, posted by Margy on October 23, 2000, at 8:22:24

Just a few quick comments concerning gabapentin: When gabapentin (Neurontin) is ramped too quickly, it can and will cause initial sedation, which from my experience, passes very quickly (commonly by week two). When the dosage is ramped up too quickly, or is too high at the onset, there appears to be a dermatological reaction. *Every* single time I have a dose increase I end up with itchy dry irritated skin, which magically disappears within ten days, *every* single time.

What Scott said about Neurontin bypassing the liver is absolutely correct! This is a HUGE advantage over most mood-stabilizers and anti-anxiety meds. Although, this key feature does present a mild drawback (I think it's of no consequence, while others may find it a great annoyance.) as there are limits to how much your body can use at a given time. Neurontin readily passes through the "blood/brain-barrier?" (I hope I understand this correctly?) and is excreted in the urine completely unchanged. But... There seems to exist a limit to how much the brain (?) can *use* at any one given time (in one single dose). The upper limit is 300 mgs I believe, with any single dosage going above and beyond this limit losing an ever-increasing percentage of usable mgs.

Many doc's seem to be *uninformed* as to Neurontin's ideal dosing schedule and ramping requirements. I had to print off a truckload of stats/abstracts/Op-Eds for my p-doc, as well as informing him that I had been experimenting with Neurontin's dosage increases, timing, and single dosage amounts. I found the med to be absolutely worthless if taken all in one dose right before bed, whether or not I was taking 300 mgs or 900 mgs. I ramped up much slower than the "norm", preventing the bone-weary heavy-lidded sedation others sometimes complain of. I also space my total daily dosage (1,500 mgs.) throughout my waking hours. My flexible Neurontin schedule is 300 mgs taken every 3-4 hours, with absolutely none taken at bedtime.

Ramping:
I started by splitting 300 mgs capsules in approximately half, either pouring half into one of those empty capsules you can get at health food stores, or just mixing it food or juice. It is incontrovertibly stable in liquid, food, and oxygen, and will not deteriorate. Therefore, your first line of defense against the sedation would be the "low and slow" methodology. Should irritated skin or rash appear, remain at that dosage level until skin irritation and/or rash disappear. Prudently, move to the next level with the expectation of possible (and temporary) dermatological reactions, and sedation.

Timing:
The same "low and slow" methodology and capsule splitting applies to the med schedule/timing. Take the halved (or quartered--whichever works best for you) dosage spaced out during the day to prevent excessive sedation and to increase med availability for when you need it most. As your body responds to the med, it is fairly easy to figure out how fast--or slow--the med is being consumed. My Neurontin consumption has an upper limit of 4.5 hours, and a lower limit of 2 hours. That is Neurontin's "window" of effectiveness for my individual body.

I'm taking Neurontin primarily for mood-stabilization and its anti-anxiety effects.

Hope this helps,

~dove

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice dove

Posted by Snowie on October 29, 2000, at 17:14:57

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice, posted by dove on October 25, 2000, at 11:43:51

Dove,

Thanks for a very informative post! So far I've increased Neurontin very slowly and have had none of the side effects you mentioned. I'm afraid to break open a 300 mg. capsule for fear that I might either take too much or not enough, so I have a prescription for 600 mg. (200 mg. x 3) per day. I don't understand why they don't make 200 mg. capsules.

Do you ever find that sometimes Neurontin works very well, and other times it doesn't seem to work at all? It's a very unpredictable medication for me.

Snowie


> Just a few quick comments concerning gabapentin: When gabapentin (Neurontin) is ramped too quickly, it can and will cause initial sedation, which from my experience, passes very quickly (commonly by week two). When the dosage is ramped up too quickly, or is too high at the onset, there appears to be a dermatological reaction. *Every* single time I have a dose increase I end up with itchy dry irritated skin, which magically disappears within ten days, *every* single time.
>
> What Scott said about Neurontin bypassing the liver is absolutely correct! This is a HUGE advantage over most mood-stabilizers and anti-anxiety meds. Although, this key feature does present a mild drawback (I think it's of no consequence, while others may find it a great annoyance.) as there are limits to how much your body can use at a given time. Neurontin readily passes through the "blood/brain-barrier?" (I hope I understand this correctly?) and is excreted in the urine completely unchanged. But... There seems to exist a limit to how much the brain (?) can *use* at any one given time (in one single dose). The upper limit is 300 mgs I believe, with any single dosage going above and beyond this limit losing an ever-increasing percentage of usable mgs.
>
> Many doc's seem to be *uninformed* as to Neurontin's ideal dosing schedule and ramping requirements. I had to print off a truckload of stats/abstracts/Op-Eds for my p-doc, as well as informing him that I had been experimenting with Neurontin's dosage increases, timing, and single dosage amounts. I found the med to be absolutely worthless if taken all in one dose right before bed, whether or not I was taking 300 mgs or 900 mgs. I ramped up much slower than the "norm", preventing the bone-weary heavy-lidded sedation others sometimes complain of. I also space my total daily dosage (1,500 mgs.) throughout my waking hours. My flexible Neurontin schedule is 300 mgs taken every 3-4 hours, with absolutely none taken at bedtime.
>
> Ramping:
> I started by splitting 300 mgs capsules in approximately half, either pouring half into one of those empty capsules you can get at health food stores, or just mixing it food or juice. It is incontrovertibly stable in liquid, food, and oxygen, and will not deteriorate. Therefore, your first line of defense against the sedation would be the "low and slow" methodology. Should irritated skin or rash appear, remain at that dosage level until skin irritation and/or rash disappear. Prudently, move to the next level with the expectation of possible (and temporary) dermatological reactions, and sedation.
>
> Timing:
> The same "low and slow" methodology and capsule splitting applies to the med schedule/timing. Take the halved (or quartered--whichever works best for you) dosage spaced out during the day to prevent excessive sedation and to increase med availability for when you need it most. As your body responds to the med, it is fairly easy to figure out how fast--or slow--the med is being consumed. My Neurontin consumption has an upper limit of 4.5 hours, and a lower limit of 2 hours. That is Neurontin's "window" of effectiveness for my individual body.
>
> I'm taking Neurontin primarily for mood-stabilization and its anti-anxiety effects.
>
> Hope this helps,
>
> ~dove

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice

Posted by SLS on October 29, 2000, at 21:36:30

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice dove, posted by Snowie on October 29, 2000, at 17:14:57

> Dove,
>
> Thanks for a very informative post! So far I've increased Neurontin very slowly and have had none of the side effects you mentioned. I'm afraid to break open a 300 mg. capsule for fear that I might either take too much or not enough, so I have a prescription for 600 mg. (200 mg. x 3) per day. I don't understand why they don't make 200 mg. capsules.
>
> Do you ever find that sometimes Neurontin works very well, and other times it doesn't seem to work at all? It's a very unpredictable medication for me.
>
> Snowie


Hi Snowie,

I experienced a sort of on-off response to Neurontin. For me, I would feel significantly better upon first starting it (600mg/day) and upon subsequent dosage increase. However, after a few days, the improvement I received at any one dosage would wane. After the waning of improvement, I would begin to experience cognitive and memory disturbances. I felt weird. After being on and off Neurontin a few times, I discovered that these things were not dosage-dependant, but rather, time-dependant.

The 100mg capsules are a pain in the butt.

Good luck.


- Scott

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice SLS

Posted by Snowie on October 30, 2000, at 19:49:48

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice, posted by SLS on October 29, 2000, at 21:36:30

>After the waning of improvement, I would begin to experience cognitive and memory disturbances. I felt weird. After being on and off Neurontin a few times, I discovered that these things were not dosage-dependant, but rather, time-dependant.

Scott,

I'm sorry, but I don't understand the above. Can you also explain what you mean by the last sentence. Are you still taking Neurontin? Thanks!

Snowie

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice

Posted by SLS on October 30, 2000, at 20:21:35

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice SLS, posted by Snowie on October 30, 2000, at 19:49:48

> >After the waning of improvement, I would begin to experience cognitive and memory disturbances. I felt weird. After being on and off Neurontin a few times, I discovered that these things were not dosage-dependant, but rather, time-dependant.
>
> Scott,
>
> I'm sorry, but I don't understand the above. Can you also explain what you mean by the last sentence. Are you still taking Neurontin? Thanks!
>
> Snowie

No, I am not taking Neurontin at the moment. What I meant by time-dependant is that the onset of the "weird" feeling, occurred at a dosage as low as 600mg once I had been taking it for five or six days. The previous times I had taken Neurontin, I worked up quickly to 1800mg, so I figured that the cognitive disturbances were a function of the high dosage. So, for me, it seems as if it doesn't matter what dosage I am taking. The weird feeling appears after a certain amount of time passes. I don't think I have ever heard of this happening with anyone else.

I just want to stress again that I would experience a mild improvement every time the dosage of Neurontin was increased. However, it would fade within a few days. Do you think your variable mood is linked to dosage changes?

I hope this has helped. I don't think you want to use my case as a typical example, though. The anti-anxiety properties of Neurontin can occur immediately. If you are bipolar, it may take a few weeks before it consistently stabilizes things.


- SLS

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice

Posted by allisonm on October 30, 2000, at 21:43:58

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice, posted by SLS on October 30, 2000, at 20:21:35

I've been taking Neurontin for almost two weeks now and am not sure it's doing anything.

I'm at 600mg (200mg in the am and 400mg at bedtime). It allegedly is to help me sleep now that my Remeron has been discontinued, but I find I wake up at 2:30 or 3:30 every morning (depending upon daylight savings time) and have a 50/50 chance now of falling asleep again. Very irritating. Also starting to be exhausting.

And I am not sure whether it's helping my mood at all. Last week was dreadful. Saturday was good. Yesterday was good. Today was not great. I finally started smirking at myself because when the days were bad, I blamed the Neurontin for not working and on the days that were good I credited it. Now I don't know and figure it probably isn't doing much for mood or for anxiety. I would think it would have had at least some effect by now. I have felt a dragging, bone-tired fatigue, but wonder whether this is from the Neurontin or from being awake since 2:30 in the morning.

Also, I have found nothing seems to touch bad moods caused by monthly hormonal changes. Or maybe they just overpowered everything last week. Still, this week -- this afternoon even -- I was starting to think those heavy "why bother, what's the point" thoughts. Then after having a good evening at painting class, everything's okey-dokey again. I hate these mood swings. I don't like being this unpredictable.

Dam. I was hoping for better/faster/more response than this. I fear I will have to change to an MAOI and especially fear the washout period.

Allison

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice allisonm

Posted by SLS on October 31, 2000, at 18:24:00

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice, posted by allisonm on October 30, 2000, at 21:43:58

Allison, what antidepressants are you taking? In general, mood-stabilizers by themselves are usually not terribly effective to relieve depression, even in bipolar disorder. Lamictal seems to be more effective than Neurontin as an antidepressant. I can't think of a single drug that would not be compatable with Neurontin. I don't think you would need to stop it, and it might act synergistically with your next drug(s).

Are you bipolar?

My guess is that your current fatigue and weariness are due to sleep deprivation and not from sedation produced by Neurontin.

Wish I could help more.


- Scott


> I've been taking Neurontin for almost two weeks now and am not sure it's doing anything.
>
> I'm at 600mg (200mg in the am and 400mg at bedtime). It allegedly is to help me sleep now that my Remeron has been discontinued, but I find I wake up at 2:30 or 3:30 every morning (depending upon daylight savings time) and have a 50/50 chance now of falling asleep again. Very irritating. Also starting to be exhausting.
>
> And I am not sure whether it's helping my mood at all. Last week was dreadful. Saturday was good. Yesterday was good. Today was not great. I finally started smirking at myself because when the days were bad, I blamed the Neurontin for not working and on the days that were good I credited it. Now I don't know and figure it probably isn't doing much for mood or for anxiety. I would think it would have had at least some effect by now. I have felt a dragging, bone-tired fatigue, but wonder whether this is from the Neurontin or from being awake since 2:30 in the morning.
>
> Also, I have found nothing seems to touch bad moods caused by monthly hormonal changes. Or maybe they just overpowered everything last week. Still, this week -- this afternoon even -- I was starting to think those heavy "why bother, what's the point" thoughts. Then after having a good evening at painting class, everything's okey-dokey again. I hate these mood swings. I don't like being this unpredictable.
>
> Dam. I was hoping for better/faster/more response than this. I fear I will have to change to an MAOI and especially fear the washout period.
>
> Allison

 

Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice

Posted by allisonm on October 31, 2000, at 19:30:57

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice allisonm, posted by SLS on October 31, 2000, at 18:24:00

Hi, Scott.
I'm also taking 400mg Wellbutrin SR (200mg in the am and 200mg at 3 pm). I'm not bipolar. It's chronic major depression (moderate). I had been on Wellbutrin SR and 15mg Remeron at night.

What was it like when you switched to Parnate? What happened when you got off whatever you were off in preparation for Parnate, or did you keep taking it?

Thanks. I appreciate your help. Happy Halloween.

Allison

 

Re: Neurontin comments

Posted by dove on November 1, 2000, at 11:34:10

In reply to Re: gabapentin [Neurontin] comments-advice, posted by allisonm on October 31, 2000, at 19:30:57

To Scott:
Same experience here with dose increase and initial improvement, only to find the effects waning within 2-3 weeks (if I'm lucky...). It really angers me. I like how I feel initially, I think I'm in for some wonderful changes, I start working and dealing with "stuff", only to find myself right back where I started.

As I was writing this something occurred to me, I think my cycling may actually be getting longer. I had an entire 48 hours on an upswing within the last 7 days, so... Could it be helping?!

To Snowie:
I don't know if I believe it's the Neurontin that's not working or unpredictable, or if it's me :-) I feel that there are days that feel much more stable than others, especially when I've just had a dose increase, and there are the other days spent drowning in the deep well....

And in regard to hormonal cycles dethroning everything else, be it depression or Neurontin, yes, a very definite yes. I'm finding the whole female "cycle" a little to determined for its own good! I actually asked my doc's for Lupron, hoping for some sort of solution, but they all said "No!". Let me know if you discover anything on that front.

I've just started some intense panic and anxiety therapy which I will detail further with a new post down near the bottom of the board. Thanks for your time one and all!

dove

 

Re: Neurontin comments -- Scott and Dove

Posted by Snowie on November 1, 2000, at 18:56:35

In reply to Re: Neurontin comments , posted by dove on November 1, 2000, at 11:34:10

Thanks, Dove and Scott, for your responses. I have copied and responded to Scott's post, as well as to Dove's to simplify my responses. I hope you don't mind that I've lumped them both together.

Snowie

> No, I am not taking Neurontin at the moment. What I meant by time-dependant is that the onset of the "weird" feeling, occurred at a dosage as low as 600mg once I had been taking it for five or six days. The previous times I had taken Neurontin, I worked up quickly to 1800mg, so I figured that the cognitive disturbances were a function of the high dosage. So, for me, it seems as if it doesn't matter what dosage I am taking. The weird feeling appears after a certain amount of time passes. I don't think I have ever heard of this happening with anyone else.
>
> I just want to stress again that I would experience a mild improvement every time the dosage of Neurontin was increased. However, it would fade within a few days. Do you think your variable mood is linked to dosage changes?
>
> I hope this has helped. I don't think you want to use my case as a typical example, though. The anti-anxiety properties of Neurontin can occur immediately. If you are bipolar, it may take a few weeks before it consistently stabilizes things.
>
> - SLS

Scott,

No, I'm not bipolar. I have general anxiety disorder and social anxiety and have been taking Xanax for about 6 years, although I quit taking it for almost a year during that six-year period and was miserable most of the time. I took a 100 mg. capsule of Neurontin one evening a few months ago, and was amazed that my need for Xanax went away that evening, and over time I have been able to reduce my original Xanax intake by half. Unfortunately, Neurontin doesn't always work as well as Xanax, and sometimes Neurontin works better. Like I said before, it's not really predictable for me. Sometimes it helps my anxiety and sometimes I can't tell that it's doing much of anything. But that was at the 100 mg. dose (100 mg. x 3).

My pdoc increased my dose to 600 mg. per day (200 mg. x 3) and even now (I took the 2nd 200 mg. around 4:30 p.m. and it's almost 8:00 p.m. now) I have a terrible headache, double vision, brain fuzz, and difficulty concentrating. However, I don't feel terribly anxious ... I don't feel much of anything (sort of zombie-like). I don't know if this feeling will go away or not, but I can't continue taking it if the side effects don't dissipate soon.

Snowie

> To Scott:
Same experience here with dose increase and initial improvement, only to find the effects waning within 2-3 weeks (if I'm lucky...). It really angers me. I like how I feel initially, I think I'm in for some wonderful changes, I start working and dealing with "stuff", only to find myself right back where I started.
>
> As I was writing this something occurred to me, I think my cycling may actually be getting longer. I had an entire 48 hours on an upswing within the last 7 days, so... Could it be helping?!
>
> To Snowie:
> I don't know if I believe it's the Neurontin that's not working or unpredictable, or if it's me :-) I feel that there are days that feel much more stable than others, especially when I've just had a dose increase, and there are the other days spent drowning in the deep well....
>
> And in regard to hormonal cycles dethroning everything else, be it depression or Neurontin, yes, a very definite yes. I'm finding the whole female "cycle" a little to determined for its own good! I actually asked my doc's for Lupron, hoping for some sort of solution, but they all said "No!". Let me know if you discover anything on that front.
>
> I've just started some intense panic and anxiety therapy which I will detail further with a new post down near the bottom of the board. Thanks for your time one and all!
>
> dove

Dove,

I certainly understand about the intense panic and anxiety. Good luck with your therapy.

I seem to be having the opposite result ... I'm having problems after increasing my dose (see my response to Scott above). I recently went on birth control pills to regulate my hormones and have noticed that I don't have the severe PMS that I used to have, although I still have some mood swings during that time.

Snowie


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