Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 5582

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Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft » Golda

Posted by LyndaK on February 3, 2002, at 21:02:09

In reply to Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by Golda on February 2, 2002, at 22:04:33

Golda,

First of all, the meds to treat asthma symptoms ABSOLUTELY give you the shakes! Your doc should've told you that if you've never been on them before and/or your pharmacy should've given you information on it.

As for going back on the Zoloft, I'm not sure why you have to do that. IF you are sleeping WELL at night (and during the day, if you need to), it seems like your immune system should be able to do its job. I know that there have been times that I have not been able to fight off a virus because my anxiety is messing up my ability to sleep well at night and is generally preventing my immune system from functioning well. In those cases, what I have done is to take a tranquilizer (Ativan) for a short period of time to knock down the anxiety and help me get the sleep I need. Once that is happening I am usually able to fight the infection completely within a week.

Hope you're feeling better soon.
Lynda


> Tonight I am confused as I thought I won my battle to get off Zoloft. I tried to wean myself off 100mg very slowly. It didn't work so I did it cold turkey. I had the zaps and tingles and thought it was a heart problem as my pulse jumped very high every time they hit and just accepted them.
>
> I thought I actually won after 2 1/2 months being off it. I got a cold that caused adult on-set asthma to kick-in, which went on to a full lung infection. My doctors tell me that to kick this infection, I have to go back on 100 mgs for the brain to fight it.
>
> I'm shaking and have tremors through out the body, as if my sugar level is dropping too fast. I'm not sure if this is from the lung inhalers, prednisone or actually withdrawal from the Zoloft as I've been told.
>
> I actually felt better before this infection hit and was able to wake up for work and had energy to actually get things done. Yes, I did notice that I clearly spoke my mind and my anger has bitten several people, but I don't want to be a pushover anymore. I'm not nasty, but I do say exactly how I feel, which is not like me. Usually I don't like conflicts and agree with everyone. Now I say it as I see it and my family doesn't like this side of me.
>
> Has anyone had this shakiness after two months? It's the tremors and the shakiness that is scaring me. If it's the lung medication causing these problems, I'd rather stay off the Zoloft. I don't understand why I need the Zoloft to help me kick the lung infection.
>
> I'm not really concerned about the angry, nasty side of me at this time. I figure that my family will have to put up with me and I will even out soon and counseling will help.
>
> I really thought I won and am saddened to think that I have to go back on 100 mgs immediately.
>
> Golda

 

Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft

Posted by Ol JI on February 25, 2002, at 23:53:56

In reply to withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by Shelly on May 4, 1999, at 17:37:51

After 2 years of various SSRI's but mainly Zoloft I too have the brain buzz. Turning my head or moving suddenly seems to accentuate it. I'm cold turkey and have no idea how long this will last but I am totally freaked about what I've been reading here ! What's going to be the long term effect of these Antidepressants? What happens in 20 years ? Is there permanent damage in the wake of all of this ? Half the medical community don't believe the brain buzz is happening. How about in our old age? Very disturbing news indeed. Who's accountable ? No one I suspect. Is there any news on what the long term effects might be ?

 

Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft

Posted by BarbaraCat on February 26, 2002, at 0:21:09

In reply to Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by Ol JI on February 25, 2002, at 23:53:56

Oh, wow, do I ever ask these same questions. I've tried stopping 6 times over the past 15 years and every time was brought to my knees. It brings up questions such as well, is this the natural progression of my disease and I need SSRI's or is it that my receptors are getting damaged and now I NEED SSRI's. It is scary. I'm glad that medical help is available, but I wonder what I'd be like if I'd never jumped on the original bandwagon. On a cheerier note, I have read that SSRI's reset the chronic stress loop in the amygdala and that they can be neuroprotective. Sure hope so. - Barbara

> After 2 years of various SSRI's but mainly Zoloft I too have the brain buzz. Turning my head or moving suddenly seems to accentuate it. I'm cold turkey and have no idea how long this will last but I am totally freaked about what I've been reading here ! What's going to be the long term effect of these Antidepressants? What happens in 20 years ? Is there permanent damage in the wake of all of this ? Half the medical community don't believe the brain buzz is happening. How about in our old age? Very disturbing news indeed. Who's accountable ? No one I suspect. Is there any news on what the long term effects might be ?

 

Re: Any suggestions of getting off of Zoloft

Posted by Chica on February 28, 2002, at 9:44:30

In reply to Another survivor and some zap theories, posted by BarbaraCat on January 27, 2002, at 12:39:18

I have been taking 100 mg. Zoloft for 4 months now...I feel that I am over my situational depression & want to get my spark back. The meds have helped me cope, but...they also have made me into an overweight slug. I really don't connect w/the Dr., he would just tell me to stay on, so he could get his $110 per hour. My thinking is that I will just slowly decrease & be off, but...now am scared because of what I've read here. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

Re: Any suggestions of getting off of Zoloft » Chica

Posted by Cam W. on February 28, 2002, at 20:18:58

In reply to Re: Any suggestions of getting off of Zoloft, posted by Chica on February 28, 2002, at 9:44:30

Cmatt - Several studies have shown that if an antidepressant is not taken for at least six months "after response" there is a great risk (>80%) of relapse. It usually takes 1 or 2 months to reach full response with SSRIs.

It takes time for the body's stress system (HPA axis), as well as other related systems that were altered and resulted in the depressive symptoms, to recover and "normalize" from a depression. You have to make sure that the realigned neurochemical pathways are strong enough to stay that way. The body has a good memory, and if you don't retrain the circuitry for a long enough period, the neuronal pathways will again return to the depressed configuration.

Have patience; you did not become depressed overnight. I always recommend that people keeping taking an antidepressant for at least a year. This greatly decreases the risk of a relapse of the depression from occuring.

I hope that this is of some help. - Cam

 

Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft

Posted by level on February 28, 2002, at 20:33:36

In reply to Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by JohnL on June 5, 2000, at 3:21:01

> > been on anti's a few times...Never withdrawed from Zoloft but am going to do it the same way I did with celexa and paxil. Reduce the dose by about 6mg-yes 6mg every 2 weeks. If your on it for a year or more you should give yourself about 4-6 months to start weaning from it. Or try something like 50mg then reduce to 40mg. stay on for 2 to 3 weeks then reduce to 30mg, then 25 mg then start cutting it by 5mg-6mg every couple weeks until your down to about 2.5mg every other day for a couple weeks. I am with you guys the majority of doctors and psychiatrists are ignorant on this. Guess they never took it before.
> > Susan - It might be a very good idea to go back on a lower dose of Zoloft for a while. Ask you doc to give you 50mg strength caps (tabs in U.S.?) and try 100mg daily for a couple of days. If this doesn't help, raise the dose to 150mg (you could raise the dose again, but I doubt you will need to). Then, about every 7 days drop the dose by 50mg and, if tolerated, do this until you are taking 50mg daily. Do this for a week, then take 50mg every other day for a week and the try to stop. This should ease your withdrawl symptoms.
> >
> > Talk this over with your doc. I have seen this method work, especially when withdrawing from higher doses of the shorter acting SRIs.
> >
> > Hope this helps - Cam
>
>
> Susan,
> I agree with Cam completely that it is probably a good idea to get back on the Zoloft and then begin a slower discontinuation strategy. There's no telling how long the withdrawal symptoms you're feeling will last. After 9 years, I would think they will take longer than usual. Normally we can expect 1 to 3 weeks. But I've heard complaints of the withdrawals lasting into months in some cases. So I think it would be a good idea to begin a slower weening process.
>
> Here's a method I've used to both get on a med and ween off of it. It has worked well for me, and maybe it could for you. Let's just assume, for the sake of an example, that you are back on Zoloft at say 100mg. The next day, take 75mg instead (break or cut the pills as needed). Then take 100mg again the next day, and then 75 again the next. And so on, alternating daily like this for about a week or so.
>
> After a week, stabilize at 75mg per day and remain at that level for about 3 or 4 days. Then, begin alternating again. This time, take 75mg, then 50mg, then 75, then 50, and so on...and finally stop and stabilize at 50. The next phase would be alternating between 50mg and 25mg. Then between 25mg and 0. And finally 0.
>
> If you still experience uncomfortable withdrawals after being at 0 for a few days, go ahead and take perhaps a 25mg dose, but then skip the next day or two. Alternate as needed between 0 and 25mg just to smooth the bumps until the storm is over. I think this seesaw alternating method works well. It's kind of like walking down the stairs slowly. And the transition from being at one dose and going to another isn't so dramatic. Much smoother, more subtle.
> JohnL

 

Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft

Posted by Gettinghealthy on March 6, 2002, at 13:23:33

In reply to withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by Shelly on May 4, 1999, at 17:37:51

I have been weaning myself off of Zoloft for several months now. I believe it is the only way to do it without the extreme side effects of dizziness, spacey head and fatigue. I am down from 150mg to 25mg and feeling great. For awhile, I didn't feel so great, but when I stopped drinking anything with caffeine I improved considerably. My advice: STOP consuming anything with caffeine. My dizziness, fatigue and yucky feelings stopped. I will be Zoloft-free within a couple of weeks and I know I will be just fine, with no nasty side effects. I hope this helps someone else. It's worth it to take the time to register if it helps anyone to feel better. Good luck. Remember to tell anyone who will listen, Zoloft IS habit forming even though the doctors and drug companies will deny it.

 

Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft

Posted by Jane Wallace on March 7, 2002, at 22:31:51

In reply to Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by Gettinghealthy on March 6, 2002, at 13:23:33

Good luck with your final step. I got off of zoloft 12/28/01 after a very slow taperdown period. I was off of it for two months. I kept having dizzy spells and problems with my blood pressure. After a visit to ENT to establish it wasn't my ears and continued problems with blood pressure medicine, I took 12.5 mg. of zoloft. I feel fine now. No high blood pressure, no dizziness, no feelings of disconnectedness. I'm going to see my doctor on Monday. This is insane. Like I said, good luck.

 

Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft

Posted by LindaK on March 7, 2002, at 22:50:53

In reply to Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by SW on October 5, 2000, at 20:07:54

Hi,
My husband Jeff had been on Zoloft since 1995,he has tried on and off for the past two years to get off Zoloft. Everytime he tried he would get severe headaches,nausea,cloudy thinking,dizziness,and on one occasion fainted.Jeff used to travel and one time left without Zoloft,I had to Fed EX it to his Hotel!
We were watching TV one night,and on 20/20 or primetime the program was about anti-depressant withdrawl. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing and hearing.About two months ago I was at a menopause discussion, several of the people were talking about how they got off their antidepressants. I started asking questions and found out about a vitamin and herb combination. I thought I would try it on Jeff (it couldn’t hurt). I started him on the combo with his Zoloft for 1 week, next week ˝ of the Zoloft with the combo. Third week ˝ Zoloft every other day with the combo, fourth week combo only. I didn’t tell Jeff what I was doing (Power of suggestion). About a week ago Jeff asked me if he was taking Zoloft anymore, I said no and told what I had done. He could not believe it, and said he felt even better than he did on Zoloft. If you are interested in trying this please let me know. I would love to see if I could help you. The price is $39 plus shipping, a lot cheaper and safer than anti-depressants. You can E-mail me at Kimble@mindspring.com. Please check our website at Atlantacollectables.com.

Sincerely,
Linda Kimble

 

Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft » LindaK

Posted by Ron Hill on March 7, 2002, at 23:15:57

In reply to Re: withdrawal symptoms coming off zoloft, posted by LindaK on March 7, 2002, at 22:50:53

>I started asking questions and found out about a vitamin and herb combination.
---------

Linda,

Specifically what vitamin(s) and what herb(s)?

-- Ron

 

Receptors and ADs » Cam W.

Posted by BarbaraCat on March 8, 2002, at 0:43:10

In reply to Re: Any suggestions of getting off of Zoloft » Chica, posted by Cam W. on February 28, 2002, at 20:18:58

Cam,
What is your take on long term effects of ADs? Is there damage or dying off of receptors during reuptake since more serotonin/NE is available? If so, is this a permanent situation? I think of how long term cocaine or meth use can damage the dopamine system irrevocably and contribute to Parkinson's. It seems like so many of us here have tried to wean off SSRI's and ended up crawling back. I was on Zoloft for 6 years consistently, 10 years total, so you'd think my HPA axis would have been well set. I tried going off 4 times during the last 4 years of that 10 year period, but each time after 6 months cried uncle. I'm now on Remeron and lithium and doing well, but am concerned that having begun medication, I'm now forever in their grip. I realize the possibility that I need these chemicals, but wonder if I need them all the more having once begun them. Looking forward to your erudite elucidations. - Barbara

Cmatt - Several studies have shown that if an antidepressant is not taken for at least six months "after response" there is a great risk (>80%) of relapse. It usually takes 1 or 2 months to reach full response with SSRIs.
>
> It takes time for the body's stress system (HPA axis), as well as other related systems that were altered and resulted in the depressive symptoms, to recover and "normalize" from a depression. You have to make sure that the realigned neurochemical pathways are strong enough to stay that way. The body has a good memory, and if you don't retrain the circuitry for a long enough period, the neuronal pathways will again return to the depressed configuration.
>
> Have patience; you did not become depressed overnight. I always recommend that people keeping taking an antidepressant for at least a year. This greatly decreases the risk of a relapse of the depression from occuring.
>
> I hope that this is of some help. - Cam

 

Re: Receptors and ADs » BarbaraCat

Posted by Cam W. on March 9, 2002, at 3:47:58

In reply to Receptors and ADs » Cam W., posted by BarbaraCat on March 8, 2002, at 0:43:10

Barbara - Tricyclic antidepressants have been around since the 1950s. There are epidemiological studies that include data on TCA use. There has been no evidence of long-lasting effects from taking antidepressants (except in some extreme cases). Leaving the depression untreated would have resulted in a much higher mortality rate.

Also, the "Prozac Babies" are now in their 20's. These were the first batch of babies who were conceived while the mother was taking Prozac or took Prozac while pregnant. Many of the offspring were followed and they have not turned out any weirder than any other American =^)

The problem may be in the kindling process that seems to be seen in major depression. The theory is that with each subsequent depressive episode, the next comes sooner, lasts longer, and is worse symptomatically. In other words, in at least some people, it seems that it is a depressive episode that does the damage to the neurocircuitry. Using antidepressants potentially interupts kindling, which would (hopefully) result in fewer lifetime episodes of depression.

I believe that the benefits obtained from taking antidepressants, when truly needed, far, far outweigh any short-term or long-term problem from the antidepressant itself.

Just my opinion - Cam

 

Re: Receptors and ADs (rather long) » BarbaraCat

Posted by IsoM on March 9, 2002, at 14:23:19

In reply to Receptors and ADs » Cam W., posted by BarbaraCat on March 8, 2002, at 0:43:10

Barbara, I'm just jumping in with an observation about me. Whether it would apply to anyone else, I have no idea & won't even hazard a guess.

I've been on ADs for +15 years now. I originally went on imipramine to see if it would help my migraines/tension headaches (I used to get both). There was no improvement with the headaches but there was a noticable improvement with my mood. I would never have said I was seriously depressed then but did feel unhappy & irritable fairly often.

Much of how I felt was due to the environment & circumstances I was in - 3 small children, an alcoholic, self-centred husband, & living in a small prairie village. I hated the climate (unbearably hot in the short summer & unbearably cold in the long winter). I was also very lonely. The people were bigoted, small-minded people who considered me an oddity because I loved science & wasn't into their "social bees".

Anyway, TCAs made life much more bearable & allowed me to be happy with my children & my own interests. When I moved back to my original home, I wanted to go off my ADs. Didn't seem able to. Over the last 7 years, I've tried going it alone 3 times & each time, conceded defeat. My thoughts/feelings were no longer simply moody & irritable without them but black, bleak, & a smoldering rage instead of just irritation. Maybe I had previously learned to control myself better without ADs but became dependent on them to keep me even-keeled? Who knows for sure? Without ADs, I hate the personality that emerges. Without them, I have no will or control to fight my feelings.

I found that stopping Luvox was horrible but stopping Paxil was even worse. The discontinuation/withdrawal symptoms never went away, even after a year & now taking Celexa which was working very well. Brain zaps, vertigo, & spacey feeelings continued so I ended up going back on Paxil (10 mg only) along with my Celexa. The symptoms didn't clear completely but did become managable. But I still wanted off the Paxil. I hated being dependent on a drug that would make you feel that horrible from even being late with the dose.

I now take adrafinil (Olmifon) along with my Celexa. Provigil is similar to Olmifon. It's supposed to increase over-all brain metabolism & I thought I'd see if I could do without Paxil & give it one more try. When I stopped the Paxil, I didn't even notice. No return of symptoms - nothing! I attribute it to the adrafinil. Nothing else is different. Nothing else explains it.

Anyway, that's my experience. I would love to see if Provigil prescribed for those wishing to discontinue their SSRIs would relieve their symptoms like it did for me. Perhaps as Provigil is prescribed more in the future, we'll read some study about it. I've noticed from various postings here in PB that people who are bipolar don't seem to react good to Provigil, so it's obviously not the answer for everyone.

 

Re: SSRI's and psychostimulants... » IsoM

Posted by Ritch on March 9, 2002, at 17:24:58

In reply to Re: Receptors and ADs (rather long) » BarbaraCat, posted by IsoM on March 9, 2002, at 14:23:19

> I now take adrafinil (Olmifon) along with my Celexa. Provigil is similar to Olmifon. It's supposed to increase over-all brain metabolism & I thought I'd see if I could do without Paxil & give it one more try. When I stopped the Paxil, I didn't even notice. No return of symptoms - nothing! I attribute it to the adrafinil. Nothing else is different. Nothing else explains it.
>
> Anyway, that's my experience. I would love to see if Provigil prescribed for those wishing to discontinue their SSRIs would relieve their symptoms like it did for me. Perhaps as Provigil is prescribed more in the future, we'll read some study about it. I've noticed from various postings here in PB that people who are bipolar don't seem to react good to Provigil, so it's obviously not the answer for everyone.


Hi IsoM,

Haven't talked to you in a while. You are onto something for sure. Well... I am off Wellbutrin after a dysphoric/insomnia/hostility episode. So, my meds are a combo of (all very low dose) Neurontin+Dexedrine Celexa+Klonopin and it is working quite well. This pstim has a noticeable *calming* effect that I find very striking. Adderall had a "wavy", "buzzy" quality about it that was very noticeable during the day with unwanted panic-like anxiety. I am sleeping better and the mild ultradian (during the day) cycling has stopped. I find that it controls my impulsiveness better than Adderall did (although I don't feel as focused). But, to get to your point about using a pstim to help "cover" an SSRI withdrawal-I think it might be possible-maybe if the person taking the SSRI is taking it primarily for depression (not anxiety disorders). As far as bipolar folks having trouble with it - I am not so sure. I have got mixed bipolar and ADHD and so far isn't causing any trouble.

Mitch

 

Re: Receptors and ADs » IsoM

Posted by BarbaraCat on March 9, 2002, at 18:15:55

In reply to Re: Receptors and ADs (rather long) » BarbaraCat, posted by IsoM on March 9, 2002, at 14:23:19

Iso,
Your prairie days sound ghastly. Glad you're out of there. I can relate to what you said about the bleak, dark and violent place you go into without the meds. Before I started ADs lo these many years ago I was depressed certainly, but it didn't have the haunted spooky crazy quality it now has when I try to stop. BTW, is Adrafinal considered a pstim? I thought it was more in the norepineprine vs. dopamine camp. At any rate, if it worked that well in reducing the paxil withdrawal blues, then it's a real exciting find. The zaps and whooshes have been said to be serotonin-related. It makes me wonder if the NE is acting as a neuro protectant somehow, or perhaps NE is what you best respond to?

I recently gave Adrafinal a try, hoping to add a little zip to a recent vegetative depression. Unfortunately, it caused a great deal of the 'inner tension' side effect and started switching me into an agitated depression with alot of crying and wringing of hands. I guess Bipolar II's really shouldn't go there, but I do so wish for something that would give me that nice focussed calm motivated feeling (gee, kinda like my meth days, in fact). I'm currently on remeron, lithium, klonopin and ambien. I'm not depressed, but I'm getting slow and porky. Any ideas out there would be appreciated. - Barbara

 

Re: Feeling Slow (and porky) » BarbaraCat

Posted by IsoM on March 9, 2002, at 19:35:55

In reply to Re: Receptors and ADs » IsoM, posted by BarbaraCat on March 9, 2002, at 18:15:55

Barbara, you'll have to excuse me but has anyone ever asked about getting your TSH level checked?

I'm a little weird about exercise. I hate doing something if it's for "exercising & toning" up. *Boring* as hell for me! But if I HAVE to work & move physically, I love it. Yet, there has to be a need or I'll vegetate & just use my mind - which is why I chose a physically challenging job. I'm not lazy. Once started, I go like the wind but I seem to need a push first. Most things are like that for me though.

Anyway, with growing older, I think we start slowing down, especially with our sedentary life-style in the west. Man will always take the easier course if given a chance. The slower we get, the harder it is to get going again. Is there any way you can start off slowly & increase your activity level? There's all sorts of strategies that can be developed to get us active again & keep us that way.

On the days I don't work, I need to jump-start my engine with some rousing, bouncing cheerful music. Just the thought of having to put it on makes me think 'ewwyyuu!' but once it starts, my mood & energy go right up. I would've been great as one of Pavlov's dogs - first time I heard the bell, I'd not only start salivating but would probably eat the other dogs too. My moods are so very easily influenced (not my logical side but my emotional side).

If meth made you feel calm & focused (like it did me too), can't you get a prescription for another kind of stim like Dexedrine? You're one of the reasons that I think adrafinil doesn't work that well for most bipolars. I'm so curious of how it affects the brains of bipolars. I'd love to see some PET scans of bipolar brains with adrafinil.

 

Re: SSRI's and psychostimulants... » Ritch

Posted by IsoM on March 9, 2002, at 19:45:54

In reply to Re: SSRI's and psychostimulants... » IsoM, posted by Ritch on March 9, 2002, at 17:24:58

Mitch, I think it's more than pstims that cover the SSRI withdrawal. I had been using Dexedrine previously but it made no difference to my brain zaps & other symptoms. Sometimes, I even think it made it a little worse or at least, more noticable.

I can't explain how but the effects of adrafinil for me was as if my brain was 'fogged up' or my head was full of cotton stuffing & the adrafinil cleared it up. It not only helps me stay awake during the day (from the narcolepsy) but gives me an over-all clearer feeling. My mind feels swept clean of all the cobwebs cluttering it before. Sadly, it doesn't really help me fall asleep better at night - I was hoping it would. So I still rely on Gravol a hour or so before I want to go to bed. Once asleep, I do sleep pretty good.

My 79 year old Mom loves adrafinil but when she's tried any AD in the past, she felt horrible & wouldn't take them. I'm actually glad she didn't. She tells me she feels happier, more alert & bright too.

I wasn't thinking that all stims caused problems with bipolars, just adrafinil/modafinil. You didn't try them or did you?

 

Re: SSRI's and psychostimulants... » IsoM

Posted by Ritch on March 9, 2002, at 22:53:25

In reply to Re: SSRI's and psychostimulants... » Ritch, posted by IsoM on March 9, 2002, at 19:45:54

> Mitch, I think it's more than pstims that cover the SSRI withdrawal. I had been using Dexedrine previously but it made no difference to my brain zaps & other symptoms. Sometimes, I even think it made it a little worse or at least, more noticable.
>
> I can't explain how but the effects of adrafinil for me was as if my brain was 'fogged up' or my head was full of cotton stuffing & the adrafinil cleared it up. It not only helps me stay awake during the day (from the narcolepsy) but gives me an over-all clearer feeling. My mind feels swept clean of all the cobwebs cluttering it before. Sadly, it doesn't really help me fall asleep better at night - I was hoping it would. So I still rely on Gravol a hour or so before I want to go to bed. Once asleep, I do sleep pretty good.
>
> My 79 year old Mom loves adrafinil but when she's tried any AD in the past, she felt horrible & wouldn't take them. I'm actually glad she didn't. She tells me she feels happier, more alert & bright too.
>
> I wasn't thinking that all stims caused problems with bipolars, just adrafinil/modafinil. You didn't try them or did you?

IsoM,

I actually was intending to try Provigil when I saw my pdoc last time. But the half-life issue and insomnia thing got brought up. I had to stop Wellbutrin due to dysphoric hypomania and insomnia. If *anything* causes sleep disturbance for me it WILL aggravate mood disturbances. Over 25 years I can see that it is *THE* link. Sleep good/mood good.

Anyhow, I brought up Provigil and it immediately flipped to "can you afford it?", and I said "it doesn't matter to me-whatever works". Well, I got written a script for dexedrine right off the bat and after my insurance paid the copay I had to fork over .... $2 bucks. SmithKline still makes the stuff-amazing-no incognito 3rd world pharmaceuticals.

Mitch

 

Re: Oversea Dexedrine » Ritch

Posted by IsoM on March 10, 2002, at 1:48:26

In reply to Re: SSRI's and psychostimulants... » IsoM, posted by Ritch on March 9, 2002, at 22:53:25

Yeah, Mitch, I find it strange that Dexedrine can't be bought from overseas too. Maybe there's too much controversy on how pure it may be or maybe that it's cheap enough here, why bother making it elsewhere?

I'm going to increase my adrafinil to 3 pills a day from the 2 I take. I suspect the initial euphoria at feeling 'normal' has had time to wear off & now I'm feeling the true effects of it alone without the benefits of the added hormone/neurotransmitter boost from being so enthralled with something so wonderful.

Kind of like that intial 'falling in love' high that's due to a true chemical reaction in our brain.

"The most well-known love-related chemical is phenylethylamine, or PEA, a naturally occurring trace amine, an organic molecule containing nitrogen, that is found in the brain. PEA is an amphetamine that is constantly produced by the body and, in elevated concentrations, can cause similar stimulation to that caused by artificially-produced amphetamine drugs. This natural "upper" contributes to the on-top-of-the-world feeling that attraction can bring. It also gives you the energy to stay awake and focused longer, making it possible to talk to your new love all night long. Attraction is not the only way to get a high from PEA. The brain also releases the stimulant during high-stress activities like bungee jumping and skydiving or, as some scientists believe, when eating chocolate.
The release of PEA sets off a chemical chain-reaction in the brain. The primary effect of PEA is the stimulated release of the neuro-transmitter dopamine, a "feel-good" chemical."

 

Re: Feeling Slow (and porky) » IsoM

Posted by BarbaraCat on March 10, 2002, at 2:15:25

In reply to Re: Feeling Slow (and porky) » BarbaraCat, posted by IsoM on March 9, 2002, at 19:35:55

Actually, I am hypothyroid and have been on thyroid for years (both T4 and T3). I also raised it when I recently went on lithium. My TSH levels look good, so I don't think that's it. Also, when I'm not depressed, exercise is my drug of choice. I've been a semi-professional dancer, yoga, etc., and although I don't get enough of it, I do exercise. It's been since taking Remeron and lithium that I'm porking out. I find myself craving stupid fatty substances and lots of them. Also, like you said, I'm getting older and am no longer the mere slip of a girl I used to be. I'm eating too darn much and therefore the dexedrine idea appeals.

Unfortunately, I 'fessed to my pdoc that I had a bit of a meth jones in my younger years and he is very loath to prescribe amphetamines. I also wonder if a stimulant is the best thing for me given my history with panic disorder and anxiety. Well, I need more exercise and that's that. I may need to cattle prod myself into it and whip myself into a frenzy given all I'm wanting to eat, but it would be just about the best thing I could do for myself. - Barbara

 

Re: Feeling Slow (and porky) » BarbaraCat

Posted by Zo on March 10, 2002, at 21:37:50

In reply to Re: Feeling Slow (and porky) » IsoM, posted by BarbaraCat on March 10, 2002, at 2:15:25

I don't know if this will make you feel better or worse, but Dexedrine by itself isn't much of an appetite suppressant.
I've been on it since '98. No diff.

Still waddling around with some of the infamous Zyprexa-50 from a year ago---but not as much.

Infuriated I can't tolerate Topamax, my v. experienced pdoc said it is THE weight loss drug.

Zo

 

Re: Diet Change » BarbaraCat

Posted by IsoM on March 10, 2002, at 22:14:46

In reply to Re: Feeling Slow (and porky) » IsoM, posted by BarbaraCat on March 10, 2002, at 2:15:25

Barbara, how good is your self-control? This really works but you really haveve to have good self-control for it to work. I really understand this thing about "craving stupid fatty substances and lots of them". It can almost be like an addiction in itself. But if you can empty your house of fatty foods for a month, your taste buds will change & the cravings will go. If you fall back into eating fatty foods, the cravings jump right back.

I don't know how hard this is for you to do. If you have to feed a household & they like fatty foods, it's tough. But if you're alone or in charge of the food, empty your fridge & cupboards of butter, margarine, crackers, cookies, sausages, bacon, etc. You get the idea. If you can go a month without eating fatty foods, the cravings go right down. You have to be creative in coming up with ideas of making foods good tasting & moist still. After the first week, you'll want fatty foods so bad you'll be ready to eat a pound of butter straight, but resist the urge to indulge yourself.

Because we're older, not young slips any more, you won't see the extra weight melt off like ads tell you, but you will start to lose weight. Most of the extra calories we consume comes from fats. As long as you don't go overboard on sugary foods, you should notice a difference after a month & more further down the road.

For me, as long as I avoid fatty foods & keep active, I can stay slim. If I get careless in either area, I'll gain. I never did when young,m but I can now & don't want to look like my dear Mom. As she says, an apple on two toothpicks. :-)

I hope you don't consider this presumptous, but keeping fats to a minimum does work. I'd add fatty acid supplements though.

 

One word: mayonnaise! » IsoM

Posted by Seamus2 on March 10, 2002, at 23:09:01

In reply to Re: Diet Change » BarbaraCat, posted by IsoM on March 10, 2002, at 22:14:46

Count me among those w/ "fatty cravings".

I could do better, but I'm pretty good already! My house doesn't have a WHOLE lot of fat, but if I pared it to a minimum I'd still be left with butter and mayonnaise.

Right alongside nicotine and caffeine.

Remember the FDA's "Food Pyramid"? Probably not, since you are in Canada... Anyway, that's my "Sustenance Tetrad" devoid of AD's since I got my testosterone issue staightened out.

Pick two, any two? Mayonnaise and cigarettes.

We all have our sins....

 

Re: One word: mayonnaise! » Seamus2

Posted by IsoM on March 10, 2002, at 23:19:06

In reply to One word: mayonnaise! » IsoM, posted by Seamus2 on March 10, 2002, at 23:09:01

Ah, Seamus, it's good to know how to cook well AND be inventive. I make my own fake mayo & believe me, it's taste great! I use lemon juice, some cayenne, & garlic to spice it up. I've gotten to the point where I really prefer the taste of my own creations. Without the fat & sugar of ready-made foods, the other flavours come through. I make lots of quick international style foods, Oriental & Indian particularly.

I never miss the butter in sandwiches & when I toast my bread (again home-made, high in protein) & eat it for breakfast, I dip it unbuttered into applesauce or stewed fruit.

Oh yes, I remember the food pyramid. It was used in Canada for many years. My absolute must is tea, hot, sweet & milky. Good thing the tea is at least considered healthy now, hey? :-)

 

Re: Diet Change » IsoM

Posted by BarbaraCat on March 11, 2002, at 13:44:35

In reply to Re: Diet Change » BarbaraCat, posted by IsoM on March 10, 2002, at 22:14:46

Hmmm, I smell a cookbook in the works here... That non-fat idea would be an interesting trial. I eat very healthy - really, I do! No junk food, fast food, snacks or anything obvious in the poundage department. No red meat, love Thai, Indian. Oh, but butter! cream! oil! CARBS!! In fact, I'd have to say that the carbs are what do me in. I have all the Zone and spinoff cookbooks. I believe it's time to dust them off and start putting them into action.

Your comment about your Mom and the apple was pretty funny. It's amazing how we turn into our parents and how those things we were exposed to early on in life are there for life. Well, I'm off for my daily walk in a lovely cold and rainy Northwest morning. - Barbara


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