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Re: Brain Signature for Melancholia Identified Robert_Burton_1621

Posted by SLS on February 21, 2015, at 7:51:55

In reply to Brain Signature for Melancholia Identified, posted by Robert_Burton_1621 on February 21, 2015, at 3:04:54

As per my personal experience, I think bipolar depression may be a hybrid between atypical and melancholic depressions.

I saw the most severe melancholic depression in a woman who was visiting her mother who lived down he block. It was excruciating to witness the magnitude of psychomotor retardation she displayed. It was like watching slow-motion. She committed suicide soon afterwards.


- Scott

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> http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/health/disruption-brain-signals-sheds-new-light-melancholic-depression
>
> For anyone interested in the nosology of depressions and, in particular, the bearing which progress in nosology may have on the classifications authorised by DSM-5, Professor Gordon Parker and his team have just published research which is claimed to isolate (for the first time) an empirically identifiable form of neurobiological dysfunction which is specific to melancholic depression.
>
> "Disrupted Effective Connectivity of Cortical Systems Supporting Attention and Interoception in Melancholia" (JAMA Psychiatry, 18 Feb 2015):
>
> http://archpsyc.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2119327
>
> Part of the resistance to reform of the DSM-5 typologies rests on scepticism as to whether melancholia is a distinct biological form of depression which ought be distinguished clinically from non-melancholic kinds.
>
> The results of this recent research may have the effect of rendering such scepticism less presumptively cogent than it has hitherto been.
>
> "Issues for DSM-5: Whither Melancholia? The Case for Its Classification as a Distinct Mood Disorder" Am J Psychiatry (2010) 167 (7):
>
> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20595426
>
> What do interested people here think about the plausibility and desirability of classifying melancholia as a distinct nosological type and the consequences such classification may have on diagnosis, treatment, and in particular medication "algorithms"?
>
> Professor Parker has been engaged in the broader project of melancholia research for decades. His important edited collection of papers on the topic can be partly read on google books.
>
> "Melancholia: A Disorder of Movement and Mood
> A Phenomenological and Neurobiological Review", Cambridge UP, 1996
>
> https://books.google.com.au/books?id=aQYJbOT4PCUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Melancholia:+A+Disorder+of+Movement+and+Mood&hl=en&sa=X&ei=bUboVOaEEYrg8gWnsIDwAg&ved=0CB4Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Melancholia%3A%20A%20Disorder%20of%20Movement%20and%20Mood&f=false
>
>
>
>


Some see things as they are and ask why.
I dream of things that never were and ask why not.

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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